33 results for Conference poster, 2015

  • Where's the Sablefish?: Exploring causes of variable sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) representation in Northwest Coast sites

    Nims, Reno; Butler, V (2015-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Mid-term results after phaco-canaloplasty and canaloplasty

    Hurtikova, KH; Traine, PT; Loertscher, Martin; Mueller, MM (2015-06-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cardiac response to weak electrical shocks challenges the functional syncytium paradigm

    Caldwell, Bryan; Trew, Mark; Pertsov, AM (2015-04-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • In Vitro Immunogenicity Screening of Two Novel Bone Graft Scaffolds

    Lock, Alistair; Gao, Yang; Callon, Karen; Pool, Bregtina; Choi, A; Munro, Jacob; Cornish, Jillian; Musson, David (2015-11-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Impact of conjugate pneumococcal vaccine on nasopharyngeal S.pneumoniae serotypes and antibiotic susceptibility over 7 years

    Best, Emma; Taylor, S; Tse, F; McBride, C; Stewart, Joanna; Lennon, Diana; Trenholme, A (2015-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Apple Waste Preservation for Extraction of Antioxidants

    Zhan, D; Oliveira, Maria; Saleh, Z (2015-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A huge amount of apple waste is generated from juice, cider and other apple product industries. This waste represents a cost and causes environmental problems. Apple waste is a rich source of polyphenolic compounds, mostly found in the apple peels and cores. Polyphenols are antioxidants with high value that can be extracted from the waste and exploited commercially. Proper methods of waste pasteurisation would allow its preservation and reduce waste degradation. In this study, diluted apple waste was pasteurised using three different technologies: thermal processing (TP), high pressure processing (HPP) and low pressure assisted thermal processing. The effect of processing on the waste native yeasts and moulds, inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and antioxidants were investigated. TP at 60, 80 and 100 °C for 30 min, HPP at 300, 400 and 500 MPa for 10 min and 600 MPa for 20 min, and low pressure assisted thermal processing at 60, 80 and 100 °C with 2 MPa for 30 min were carried out. The total yeasts and moulds initially in the diluted apple waste was about 6.6×101 cfu/g, which was fully inactivated by the three technologies. S. cerevisiae inoculated in the waste was reduced by 5-log or more with all processing methods/conditions. HPP and low pressure assisted thermal processing treatments did not affect the antioxidant activity (DPPH-radical scavenging). However, both TPC and DPPH radical scavenging decreased with TP (p < 0.05). The results of this study can be helpful for designing appropriate conditions to pasteurise fruit industry byproducts for further extraction of high value antioxidants.

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  • Moving From Hard Copy to Online Marking Made Easy

    Li, C; Sheridan, Donald (2015-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Significant efficiencies can be made in marking classes with large enrolment using a workflow that involves existing or inexpensive technologies. This poster describes how innovative processes saved time, money, improved educational outcomes and quality assurance.

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  • Forbidden crystals: Penrose tiling with molecules

    Nam, SJ; Waterhouse, GIN; Ware, David; Brothers, Penelope (2015-02-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Since the first discovery of quasicrystals by mathematicians in the 1960s, quasicrystalline patterns which possess unusual symmetric orders have become an issue among mathematicians. Observation of 5-fold crystal symmetry in metal alloys in 1984 has attracted other scientists. Penrose tiling is the simplest quasicrystal comprised of only pentagon motifs. Although quasicrystals have been observed in alloys and soft matter states (polymers, colloids), no one has yet successfully generated full molecular quasicrystals. Only small pieces of molecular Penrose tiling have been reported. We are working on this challenge by using molecules with 5-fold symmetry as molecular ‘tiles’ to create 2-dimensional molecular Penrose tilings. Alignment of the tiles is the key to creating the quasicrystalline pattern. Possible candidates as tiles which must be synthetically accessible are croconate and its derivatives, macrocycles such as campestarene and supramolecules such as cucurbituril. The techniques of coordination and supramolecular chemistry will direct the ordering of the tiles. After deposition of the synthesised tiles on substrates, surface imaging (STM and AFM) and analytical techniques (XPS, LEED, GI-SAXS) will be used to investigate the resulting films.

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  • Applying threshold concepts to unlock the ‘hidden’ core of a multifaceted health sciences curriculum

    Petersen, Mary; Egan, John; Barrow, Mark (2015-07-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Title: Applying threshold concepts to unlock the ‘hidden’ core of a multifaceted health sciences curriculum Background/context: In 2014, a curriculum implementation plan was developed to comprehensively map the existing Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) curriculum so as to inform a cohesive workforce-related vision for the future. However, prior to mapping the curriculum, staff first needed to agree upon what the future-focused set of graduate capabilities across their diverse programme should be. To do so, we applied Meyer and Land’s (2003) notion of threshold concepts to enable us to unpack and clarify what felt like a complex, and at times hidden, core curriculum. Research/evaluation method: The existing BHSc programme was analysed using the frame of threshold concepts through a series of staff and student focus group sessions. This led to a refining of six central threshold concepts for the degree. This in turn informed the revision of a set of programme-wide graduate capabilities. Pre-review course outlines (n=24) and assessments (n=104) were analysed using thematic coding in NVivo and then mapped against the proposed graduate capabilities and thresholds for the revised BHSc. Lecturers validated these data using co-constructed matrices to explore coverage of these thesholds across the programme. At the end of 2014, teaching staff involved in the curriculum project (n=14) completed an evaluation analysing their perception of the effects of applying threshold concepts to their own development, and to their BHSc programme knowledge development. Outcomes: Evaluation results indicate that staff now report a greater common sense of purpose, increased collegiality and a more clarified overarching vision for the BHSc programme (which encompasses at least six distinct pathways of learning within the health sciences). By applying the frame of threshold concepts to the programme curriculum, many staff reported surprise that ‘taken for granted’ competencies such as academic, information and professional literacies were not actually being systematically built upon across the three years of the BHSc. This has been the springboard to a programme-wide redevelopment of the BHSc core courses assisted by external health sector representatives. Additionally, two new complementary ‘capstone’ courses have been planned for stage three of the programme which will more purposefully address real-world, essential graduate capabilities. How the conference sub-themes are addressed (200 words): This poster focuses centrally on conference theme one by exploring how threshold concepts can assist the process of establishing what capabilities are required of (BHSc) graduates and how we can ensure these are responsive to (health) sector needs. It highlights examples from practice in the Bachelor of Health Sciences programme. We first show how an overarching programme purpose was reframed in conjunction with external sector input by utilising Meyer & Land’s notion of threshold concepts. Next we illustrate examples of effective tools and processes (co-constructed matrices) that were applied by academic staff to shed light on gaps and overlaps in existing core course content and assessment tasks. Related to this we address questions from conference theme three concerned with how we can assess, embed and evaluate these graduate capabilities once we have mapped them across our courses. Examples also illustrate the processes utilised in designing stage three ‘capstone’ courses to embed and assess these graduate capabilities.

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  • Annotation of Clinical Datasets Using openEHR Archetypes

    Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Atalag, Koray; de Bono, B; Hunter, Peter (2015-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • fMRI Measures of the Dorsal Visual Cortex Correlates with Behavioral Performance and Cortical Thickness

    Poppe, Tanya; Leung, Myra; Tottman, Anna; Harding, Jane; Bloomfield, Francis; Alsweiler, Jane; Thompson, Benjamin (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Reverse Mentoring: Benefits and Barriers

    Ross, M; Dunham, Annette (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Current research suggests that the modern workforce is comprised of a substantial proportion of ageing employees, in addition to an influx of young, first-time workers. This diverse and multigenerational workforce provides organisations an interesting challenge, in retaining engaged and productive employees, and ensuring relevant training and development. One specific management practice is reverse mentoring. Reverse mentoring is a unique form of mentoring, whereby the traditional roles of mentor and mentee are reversed. It involves a junior employee (in age/status) mentoring a senior employee. The junior employee is able to share their recent generational learnings and perspective with a senior organisational member, who gains insight into recent trends and technologies. Whilst there appear to be many benefits from this relationship, including increased communication and understanding; leadership development; and upskilling in relevant trends, there may also be some barriers to the success of the relationship. Barriers may include a resistance to the shift in power hierarchy and challenges with changing the traditional learning pedagogy of older teacher and younger learner. Aim: Reverse mentoring is a reasonably modern concept, and as such, empirical research on this practice is relatively new. This research aims to explore any benefits and barriers experienced in a reverse mentoring relationship. Method: Participants in this study will be recruited from a Melbourne hospital, who currently run a formal reverse mentoring relationship program. Approximately 16 individuals (8 mentors and 8 mentees), will be invited to participate. The proposed study uses a qualitative method of data collection, through semi-structured interviews. Interviews will be recorded, and responses will be transcribed, with thematic analysis used to identify common themes. Thematic analysis allows the common themes and experiences of mentors and mentees, to tell an overall story of the data. Conclusion: The proposed study’s findings contribute to a currently small base of research on reverse mentoring. It is hoped that the research will help (i) inform future quantitative research on reverse mentoring and (ii) inform organisational strategies that will help employees engage in reverse mentoring relationships in ways that effectively support their training and development.

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  • Variability in soil CO2 efflux across distinct urban land cover types

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2015-04-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    As a main source of greenhouse gases urban areas play an important role in the global carbon cycle. To assess the potential role of urban vegetation in mitigating carbon emissions we need information on the magnitude of biogenic CO2 emissions and its driving factors. We examined how urban land use types (urban forest, parklands, sportsfields) vary in their soil CO2 efflux.We measured soil CO2 efflux and its isotopic signature, soil temperature and soil moisture over a complete growing season in Auckland, New Zealand. Soil physical and chemical properties and vegetation characteristics were also measured. Mean soil CO2 efflux ranged from 4.15 to 12 molm 2 s 1.We did not find significant differences in soil CO2 efflux among land cover types due to high spatial variability in soil CO2 efflux among plots. Soil (soil carbon and nitrogen density, texture, soil carbon:nitrogen ratio) and vegetation characteristics (basal area, litter carbon density, grass biomass) were not significantly correlated with soil CO2 efflux. We found a distinct seasonal pattern with significantly higher soil CO2 efflux in autumn (Apr/May) and spring (Oct). In urban forests and sportsfields over 80% of the temporal variation was explained by soil temperature and soil water content. The 13C signature of CO2 respired from parklands and sportsfields (-20 permil - -25 permil) were more positive compared to forest plots (-29 permil) indicating that parkland and sportsfields had a considerable proportion of C4 grasses. Despite the large intra-urban variability, our results compare to values reported from other, often climatically different cities, supporting the hypothesis of homogenization across urban areas as a result of human management practices.

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  • PUKUmahi!: Kia whai te huarahi tika. NETwork! Roadmap for safe travel: Ensuring health benefits flow on to Māori

    Henare, Kimiora; Parker, K; Print, Cristin; Findlay, Michael; Lawrence, Benjamin (2015-11-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NET) are complex and variable, making it very difficult for clinicians to determine the best course of treatment. The NETwork project seeks to better understand the epidemiological impact of NETs in New Zealand, and to better characterise the disease to help inform oncologists how to treat it. The estimated incidence rate of patients with NETs in New Zealand is approximately 200 patients per year, however the impact among Māori is not yet known. Māori are disproportionately burdened by cancers of the lungs, stomach, and pancreas, so it is tempting to speculate that NET incidence among Māori could also be high. It is essential that Māori are involved in the study in order to get an accurate indication of the impact of this cancer in New Zealand, what genes are driving the cancers, and how each can be treated. The multi-faceted NETwork project combines epidemiological analysis and deep genome sequencing of retrospective and prospective NET tissues. Under the guidelines set out in Te Ara Tika, the design of this research project is mainstream, but is likely to involve Māori participants and have direct relevance to Māori. Despite being neither Māori-centred nor Kaupapa Māori in our approach, the NETwork team are dedicated to honouring the Treaty of Waitangi principles of partnership, participation, and protection. Mindful of the past transgressions involving the use of tissues and genetic information obtained from indigenous populations here in New Zealand and overseas, the NETwork group are keen not to repeat these errors themselves, nor facilitate the opportunity for others to do so. Following ongoing consultation with Te Mata Ira, Maui Hudson, Dr Helen Wihongi, and Associate Professor Papaarangi Reid, we have established a ‘roadmap for safe travel’ to guide all aspects of the multi-faceted project. The framework has three key principles (kawa) underpinning its Governance structure, and three core cultural protocols (tikanga) to be incorporated into the implementation strategies. Adhering to these kawa and tikanga should facilitate the establishment and maintenance of relationships with key stakeholders; a vital aspect to the project. The roadmap for safe travel is still in its early stages of development, and consultation is ongoing. Nevertheless, the NETwork team have a strong platform from which to further develop their project. Although the presented framework is specific to the NETwork project, it could easily be adjusted and utilised for other clinical and biomedical projects.

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  • Who are Today's Dads?

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Morton, Susan (2015-12-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Do you see what I see? - Surveillance and response

    Patel, Reena; Dixon, Robyn; Webster, Craig (2015-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: Early warning scoring systems and rapid response teams are important strategies to improve the detection of patient deterioration in hospitals. Initiation of an appropriate response relies on nurses recognising changes in patient condition and alerting the required emergency assistance team. Study Objective: To determine the level of concordance between the nurse’s assessment and that of the emergency team, based on early warning scores (EWS). Methods: An audit of data collected between June 2011 and May 2013 was undertaken and 2780 instances were reviewed in order to determine the degree of concordance on EWS scores between nurses initiating calls and those assigned by the emergency response team. Results: 881 instances lack of concordance was identified. In the majority of instances, the nurse overestimated the severity of the patient’s condition when compared to the emergency response team’s score. Conclusion: Such lack of concordance is problematic given that failure to activate an emergency response when required has obvious implications for patient safety while inappropriate referral to emergency response teams can result in inefficient use of resources.

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  • A case of overwhelming sepsis in splenectomised child

    Alkhudairi, Z; Wilson, E; Best, Emma (2015-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bridging the Computational Modelling and EHR standards using openEHR and Semantic Web Technology

    Atalag, Koray; Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Cooling, Michael; Nickerson, David (2015-10-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Linking clinical data to computational physiology will enable real-world model validation as well as the possibility of personalised and population level predictive decision support tools. Electronic health records (EHR) embody quantifiable manifestations of genomic and environmental aspects that impact on biological systems when clinical data are structured. However data quality and semantic interoperability remains a major challenge in the world of EHRs. In the computational physiology domain recent attempts to enable semantic interoperability heavily rely on Semantic Web technologies and utilise ontology-based annotations (e.g. RICORDO) but a wealth of useful information and knowledge sits in EHRs where Semantic Web technologies have very limited use. openEHR provides a set of an open engineering specifications that provides a canonical health record architecture and open source tooling to support data collection and integration. Core openEHR specifications have also been adopted by ISO and CEN making it a full international standard which underpins many national programs and has multi-vendor implementations worldwide. Our work describes how to use openEHR to normalise, annotate and link clinical data with biophysical models by using openEHR Archetypes as semantic pointers to underlying clinical concepts in EHR.

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  • Quality of Life in Fit Elderly Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) Receiving Oral Fludarabine-Based Regimens As First Line Therapy: Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) CLL5 Trial

    Suneet, S; Gill, D; Turner, PD; Renwick, WEP; Latimer, M; Mackinlay, N; Berkahn, Leanne; Simpson, DR; Campbell, P; Forsyth, C; Cull, G; Harrup, R; Best, G; Bressel, M; Di Iulio, J; Kuss, BJ; Mulligan, S (2015-12-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Modelling of Gas Hydrate Dissociation During The Glacial-Inter-glacial Cycles, Case Study The Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    Oluwunmi, Paul; Pecher, Ingo; Archer, Rosalind; Moridis, GJ; Reagan, MT (2015-12-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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