32 results for Conference poster, 2016

  • Pride and Prejudice: Social Workers’ Experiences of the Profession

    Staniforth, Barbara; Beddoe, Elizabeth (2016-06-28)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • LiDAR and EM conductivity investigation of a Holocene coastal landslide complex: Pourewa Landslide Zone, Auckland, New Zealand

    Liu, S; Brook, Martin; Richards, NP; Bevan, D; Prebble, W (2016-12-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Rapid mapping of a Holocene coastal landslide using Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry: Ohuka Landslide, Port Waikato, New Zealand

    Bevan, D; Brook, MS; Tunnicliffe, Jon; Prebble, W (2016-12-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Quaternary geology of the Auckland urban region, New Zealand: geotechnical properties and engineering implications

    Brook, Martin; Roberts, R; France, S; Williams, AL; Prebble, W (2016-12-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Loop closure and kinase selectivity in lung cancer

    Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher (2016-07-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Somatic mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors that causes aberrant signalling have been implicated in the development of lung cancer. Two such receptors, EGFR and FGFR kinases are directly involved in many cases of aggressive metastasis and drug resistance. The FGFR kinase family consists of four highly conserved receptor proteins (FGFR1 ??? FGFR4). FGFR pathways are the main cause of resistance to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer patients, and 22% of them show over-expression of FGFR1. There are a number of small molecules in phase III clinical trials that target not only FGFR but also other kinases. A wide range of EGFR mutations are linked to lung cancer development in never-smokers or former smokers. The two most common mutations are exon 19 deletions and the point mutation L858R in exon 21. Many patients harbouring L858R acquire a secondary T790M mutation after treatment with gefitinib/erlotinib resulting in drug resistance. In the past few years AstraZeneca have developed drugs that target specific proteins, eg; AZD4547 (FGFR1 selective) and AZD9291 (selectivity for T790M/L858R EGFR). In an effort to design our own novel and selective inhibitors, we solved the structures of AZD4547 and AZD9291 in complex with FGFR and EGFR respectively. In both cases, the phosphate binding loop (P-loop) of the proteins forms an unusual ???bent??? structure wrapped closely around these inhibitors. We speculate that the ability of these compounds to induce P-loop closure is an important part of their respective selectivity mechanisms.

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  • Urea cycle enzymes and peptidylarginine deiminase in Alzheimer's superior frontal gyrus

    Cicolini, J; Jing, Y; Waldvogel, Henry; Faull, Richard; Liu, P (2016-07-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The spirit that is one's own: A conversation in two tongues, Ko te wairua n?? te tangata ake: He whakawhitiwhiti k??rerorero ki roto i ng?? reo e rua

    Dattaray, D; Keegan, Peter (2016-11-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Indigenous epistemes and philosophies help one understand ethical responsibilities in a changing world, between knowing and learning. Aesthetic, socio-political, cultural and normative aspects of human existence are reflected in Indigenous narrative traditions and language practices. This paper attempts to forge connections between the historical and discursive Indigenous practices of M??ori of New Zealand and Karbis from the North East of India. M??ori are the only indigenous group in New Zealand. M??ori are now highly urbanized, in a largely English speaking and Western dominated context, yet have made important gains in language and cultural revitalization. The North East of India today is a profound paradox that simultaneously represents the frontiers of globalization as well as a heritage of Indigenous traditions and cultures. In present-day India, the ???North East??? often denotes a sense of geographical isolation and is perceived as a region of ethnic strife and violence. North East is also a treasure trove of culture and tradition belonging to hundreds of Indigenous communities from the region. Through an interdisciplinary dialogue, the paper attempts a rethink on issues of public accessibility, intellectual and cultural property rights. Further, it underlines the significance of reciprocal education and training in the context of Indigeneity.

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  • Lower Limb Estimation from Sparse Landmarks using an Articulated Shape Model

    Zhang, Ju; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Besier, Thor (2016-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rapid generation of lower limb musculoskeletal models is essential for patient-specific gait modeling. Motion-capture is a routine part of gait assessment but contains relatively sparse geometric information. We present an articulated statistical shape model of the lower limb that estimates realistic bone geometry, pose, and muscle attachment regions from seven commonly used motion-capture markers. Our method obtained a lower (p=0.02) surface error of 4.5 mm RMS compared to 8.5 mm RMS using standard isotropic scaling, and was more robust, converging in all 26 test cases compared to 20 for isotropic scaling.

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  • Measuring mindfulness at interval level: Transformation of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire using Rasch approach

    Medvedev, Oleg; Siegert, RJ; Kerston, P; Kr??geloh, CU (2016-05-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: Significant contribution of mindfulness to individuals??? health and well-being requires precise mindfulness measures for accurate assessment of psychological and cognitive changes in individuals undergoing mindfulness-based interventions. The widely used measure of trait mindfulness the 39-item Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ; Baer, Smith, Hopkins, Krietemeyer, & Toney, 2006) including: Observing, Describing, Act With Awareness, Non-Judging and Non-reacting to inner experience has shown acceptable psychometric properties but no efforts were made to increase precision of its subscales in discriminating between trait levels. Method: Rasch analysis was conducted to enhance the psychometric properties of the FFMQ using sample of 296 participants. Results: The best fit to the Rasch model was achieved for all five FFMQ subscales after minor modifications that involved combining locally dependent items into subtests and removing two items that critically affected the estimates. Discussion: Findings support structural validity of the FFMQ subscales and allow researchers and clinicians transform ordinal FFMQ responses to interval level data suitable for parametric statistics, which increases measurement precision. Conversion tables are included here for convenience and can be used without any modifications of the original FFMQ response format. Further implications of these findings are discussed.

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  • Phagocytosis by human brain pericytes: implications for Alzheimer???s disease

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Scotter, Emma; Smyth, L; Park, In; Curtis, Maurice; Faull, Richard; Graham, S; Dragunow, Michael (2016-06-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Explaining parallel computing to your grandmother: Drive-by learning for developing soft skills by communicating with a general audience

    Varoy, E; Aziz, M; Burrows, J; Sinnen, Oliver; Giacaman, Nasser (2016-05-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Diagnostic Utility of a Next Generation Sequencing Retinal Panel in a M??ori and Polynesian population with Inherited Retinal Disease

    Vincent, Andrea; Coysh, A; van Bysterveldt, K; Oliver, Verity; Black, G (2016-05-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma - aiming for zero recurrence

    Doyle, Anthony; Graydon, A; French, JG; Hanlon, M (2016-04-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over a 13 year period, a single radiologist (AJD) performed radiofrequency ablation (RFA)of osteoid osteoma in 32 patients. The lesions were located mostly in the lower extremities (femur N=15, tibia N=9) and spine (N=5). Lesion size varied from 4 to 18 mm, average 10 mm. Patient age ranged from 5 to 23 years, average 14 years. All but two had RFA as their primary treatment, with two treated after surgical excision had resulted in recurrence. CT guidance was used for all procedures, performed under general anaesthetic. A variety of different radiofrequency generators and probes were used. No complications occurred. None of the patients showed any signs of recurrence and none required further intervention. Although the followup period varied (and a few patients were lost to followup after a few weeks), most of the patients were followed for at least 12 months post procedure, with maximum followup seven years. We conclude that, with careful technique, the recurrence rate for RFA of osteoid osteoma can approach zero. Details of technique are discussed in the poster itself.

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  • What is the host range of Phytophthora agathidicida in New Zealand

    Ryder, Jessica; Burns, Bruce (2016-08-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    hytophthora agathidicida is a virulent oomycete plant pathogen, which is currently known to only infect Agathis australis in New Zealand. Phytophthora species rarely have a single plant host, so other hosts for P. agathidicida are likely but unknown. Phytophthora species are also often cryptic and sometimes asymptomatic on their host plants, making it a challenge to identify their true host range. Once an exotic Phytophthora species is introduced to an area, it becomes virtually impossible to eliminate. A sound understanding of a Phytophthora???s epidemiology is needed to prevent its spread onto uninfected hosts. This study determined whether P. agathidicida has a wider host range than currently recognised. Plant community composition was compared between healthy and infected kauri forest to detect possible susceptible species, and detached leaf assays were utilised as a further screen of possible hosts. Results showed a significant difference in species abundances between sites infected with P. agathidicida and sites without P. agathidicida that was unrelated to other potential variables. Leaf assays also indicated several other native plant species other than A.australis as possible carriers or hosts, including Knightia excelsa and Leucopogon fasciculatus. Identifying the host range of P. agathidicida is important for optimising the design of future control strategies for this pathogen.

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  • Using torque rheology to characterise cure of bio-based powder coatings

    Draneboisa, CNE; Smith, D; De Silva, Kaluachchi; Taylor, Mark (2016-07-26)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Empirical liquefaction-induced lateral displacements relationship using Lidar data of the Canterbury earthquake sequence

    Wu, C; Orense, Rolando (2016-04-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Evaluation of liquefaction susceptibility using the critical state soil mechanics concept

    Orense, Rolando; Tan, Wei Yoong (2016-04-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • What should be stored in Biobanks? Using computational modelling to unravel genotype to phenotype linkage

    Cooling, Michael; Atalag, Koray (2016-10-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bridging Computational Modelling and Clinical Information using openEHR and Semantic Web

    Atalag, Koray; Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Kalbasi, R; Cooling, Michael; Nickerson, David; Hunter, Peter (2016-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Linking clinical data to computational physiology is a crucial step for personalised and predictive Medicine. Electronic health records (EHR) embody quantifiable manifestations of genetic and environmental effects that impact on biological systems. Recent attempts to enable this linkage heavily rely on semantic technologies however in the world of EHRs Semantic Web has very limited use. openEHR provides open engineering specifications and tooling to tackle health data which supports Semantic Web. We are setting up an openEHR-based research data repository at ABI to normalise and annotate clinical and experimental data with an aim to integrate with the Physiome Model Repository (PMR).

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  • Similar estimates of contrast sensitivity and acuity from psychophysics and automated analysis of optokinetic nystagmus

    Dakin, Steven; Turnbull, Philip (2016-05-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is a particularly useful way of characterising functional vision, its psychophysical measurement relies on observers being able to make reliable perceptual reports. This can be challenging e.g. when testing children. Here we describe a system for measuring the CSF without observer-report using an automated analysis of optokinetic nystagmus (OKN), an oscillatory eye movement made in response to moving stimuli (here, spatial-frequency - SF - band-pass noise). We show that predicting perceived direction using the proportion of eye movements that are consistent with OKN in the stimulus direction allows us to make an unbiased estimate of contrast sensitivity across SF. We next compare CSFs of 25 observers derived using either OKN or perceptual report. Both approaches yield near-identical CSFs that capture subtle inter-observer variations in acuity (R=0.80, p< 0.0001) and contrast sensitivity (R=0.80, p< 0.0001) amongst observers with ostensibly normal vision. A trial-by-trial analysis reveals that, even when observers' perceptual report is at chance, there is a very high correlation between our OKN-derived measure and observers' perceptual report. This indicates that OKN and self-report are likely tapping into a common neural mechanism providing further support for the proposal that OKN is a valid alternative to the current gold standard measures of CSF based on perceptual report. We discuss how our approach can be paired with an efficient psychophysical method to derive rapid automated measures of the CSF and other measures of functional vision.

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