277 results for Conference poster

  • ResearchSpace@Auckland : Disaster Recovery (DR)

    Latt, Yin Yin; Hayes, Sharron (2008-04-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The University of Auckland Library and Information Technology Services have partnered to provide a DSpace installation utilising a mature IT infrastructure. The application is hosted on the University of Auckland???s virtual server cluster in the recently completed ???City Data Centre??? along with other enterprise systems. ResearchSpace is operational 24x7 and has a Disaster Recovery mirror located at a second location. Handle identifiers are maintained between the two systems to ensure users can submit items at all times.

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  • Stream Restoration: Getting the microbial ecology right.

    Lewis, Gillian; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Boothroyd, Ian; Stott, Rebecca; Roberts, Kelly; Ancion, Pierre; Dopheide, Andrew; Washington, Vidya; Knight, Duane; Smith, Joanna (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A comprehensive program to re-establish the structure and function of an ecosystem, including its natural diversity and aquatic habitats.

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  • Ciliate Diversity in Stream Biofilms revealed by group-specific PCR primers.

    Dopheide, Andrew; Lear, Gavin; Stott, R; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The ciliates are a diverse protozoan phylum, thought to be of considerable ecological importance in stream ecosystems, including organisms which are abundant and important consumers of bacteria, algae and other protozoa. Understanding of ciliate diversity and ecology is limited, however, particularly in benthic habitats such as stream biofilms. In this study, phylum-specific PCR primers were used in combination with cloning, sequencing and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis to investigate ciliate communities in stream biofilms.

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  • A novel implantable blood pressure telemetry device: Comparison between Data Sciences and Telemetry Research systems

    Malpas, Simon; Lim, M; McCormick, John; Kirton, RS; Van Vliet, B; Easteal, Allan; Barrett, Carolyn; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Budgett, David (2008-04-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The pending expiry (May 2008) of a Data Sciences (DSI) patent in the area of blood pressure telemetry permits the development of alternative technologies. A key aspect in providing new telemetry systems is a comparison to existing technology. Important aspects include stability of the calibration over time and the ability to capture the pulsitile blood pressure waveform. In a group of 6 rats and 5 rabbits DSI blood pressure transmitters (C40 or D70 models) were implanted in conjunction with Telemetry Research (TR) transmitters. Both systems incorporate a fluid filled catheter of similar dimensions with a biocompatible gel in the tip. The blood pressure waveform was collected via telemetry for up to 2 months after implantation. The signal was sampled at 500 Hz and digitally transmitted to a receiver up to 5 m away The battery of TR transmitter was recharged within the rat using inductive power transfer technology. The pulsitile waveform associated with each heart beat was reflected similarly in all cases although the frequency response of DSI telemeters was limited to ~40 Hz (???3 dB rolloff point). The calibrated offset level between the two transmitters was not more than 5 mmHg at all times over a 2 month period. We conclude that the Telemetry Research blood pressure transmitters offer comparable performance to existing technology but with extra design advantages (rechargeable, co-housing of animals, greater range).

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  • Molecular investigation of protozoan diversity in stream biofilms

    Dopheide, AJ; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2006-11-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research aims to test the following hypothesis: that molecular biological methods will allow description of protozoan diversity and ecology in streams.

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  • A new implantable transmitter for simultaneous recording of sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure

    Lim, M; McCormick, John; Kirton, RS; Budgett, David; Kondo, Masahiro; Pallas, Wayne; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Barrett, Carolyn; Malpas, Simon (2008-04-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    ???Over activity of the sympathetic nervous system has been implicated in a number of cardiovascular diseases. ???The direct recordings of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in conscious animals in combination with blood pressure provides ideal platform for exploring the role of SNA in the disease process. ???While a telemetry system has been developed to enable recording of SNA it has required the implantation of a separate transmitter to record blood pressure. ???We have now developed wireless implantable transmitters capable of simultaneously recording arterial blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity.

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  • Substrate capture mechanism provides a mode for inhibition

    Evans, Genevieve; Short, F; Castell, A; Cookson, T; Gamage, Swarnalatha; Denny, B; Baker, E; Lott, S (2011-05-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Mycobacteria tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis, is responsible for more death in the world today than any other bacteria. As part of the Tuberculosis Structural Genomics Consortium (TBSGC), our research group previously determined the structure of anthranilate phosphoribosyl transferase (AnPRT) from Mtb. AnPRT is the second enzyme in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and was identified as a potential drug target through gene knockout experiments, which resulted in a strain of Mtb that was essentially avirulent even in immunodeficient mice. AnPRT catalyses a reaction between anthranilate and phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP), and the crystal structure of Mtb-AnPRT was originally determined with and without PRPP (PDB ID: 1ZVW and 2BPQ, respectively). In silico docking was used to predict the binding motif of anthranilate, the second substrate, surprisingly predicted two sites despite a 1:1 reaction ratio with PRPP. Previously, 165 compounds were screened for inhibitory action against Mtb-AnPRT. The most potent of these compounds was co-crystallized with Mtb-AnPRT and PRPP. One compound had a bianthranilate character and the 2.0 ?? resolution structure of this inhibitor bound to Mtb-AnPRT (PDB ID: 3QQS) was determined by molecular replacement using the Mtb-AnPRT structure without PRPP bound (PDB ID: 1ZVW) as a search model. Interestingly, the structure revealed multiple binding motifs for the inhibitor, two of which were consistent with the previously predicted binding motifs for anthranilate. Forty analogues of this potent Mtb-AnPRT inhibitor were subsequently assayed for activity against the enzyme, several of which showed were found to be more potent inhibitors. This new series of inhibitors were docked into the 3QQS structure, providing insights for the development of more potent inhibitors. Such techniques will continue to drive design of increasingly potent inhibitors against Mtb-AnPRT for future development of a new anti-tuberculosis agent.

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  • Pretraining effects on cognitive load in authentic settings when learning complex science ideas?

    Haslam, Carolyn; Hamilton, Richard (2015-08-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    High cognitive load is often a consequence of learning complex ideas in science. One approach to reducing cognitive load when learning complex material is ??pretraining?? which involves the presentation of the information essential for understanding the concepts in two stages: Stage 1 - present names and characteristics of the main parts or ideas to provide the learners with some prior knowledge but no understanding of the concepts; Stage 2 - present material required for full understanding of the concepts. This study assessed the impact of pretraining on the efficiency of learning of basic graphing skills and complex physics concepts within actual classrooms. 495 students participated in this study and were given either pretraining and a power-point presentation, just the power-point presentation, or the power-point presentation twice. The pretraining group reported lower subjective cognitive load scores, greater improvement from pre to posttest and greater efficiency in learning (i.e., effective use of mental effort while learning) than the other two treatments. This supports the usefulness of pretraining as a strategy to reduce cognitive load and enhance learning within authentic settings.

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  • Postmortem violence? Identifying and interpreting postmortem disturbance in Mongolia

    Littleton, Judith; Frohlich, B (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Deliberate violence to remains can be inflicted post-mortem but archaeologically distinguishing the source of disturbance is hard enough while interpreting motive may be impossible. We present the results of excavation of 37 Bronze Age mounds, northernMongolia. Based on detailed analysis of burial structure, patterns of articulation, damage to elements and movement of bones within and outside the burial space, we argue there is evidence of human activity distinguishable from that of animals. Alternative hypotheses of disturbance incidental to robbery versus intentional post-mortem violence are evaluated in the context of the graves themselves, the archaeological context and ethnographic studies.

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  • Pneumococcal Vaccine Decreases Hospitalised Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children <Two Years In An Area Of High Respiratory Disease Burden

    Trenholme, A; Lennon, Diana; Best, Emma; Stewart, Joanna; Mcbride, C; Byrnes, Catherine; Walker, W; Percival, T; Mason, H; Vogel, A (2011-11-16)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc

    Herbst, M; Nicolau, Laura; Kilmartin, Paul (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc

    Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Kilmartin, PA; Nicolau, L (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Stability of varietal aromas in Marlborough Sauvignon blanc wines

    Herbst, M; Kilmartin, Paul; Nicolau, Laura (2007-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of Sauvignon blanc Wines

    Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Nicolau, L; Kilmartin, Paul (2010-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Identification of a lead hypoxia-activated irreversible pan-HER inhibitor SN32807 (PR509) by pharmacokinetic and anti-tumor efficacy screening in an erlotinib-resistant xenograft model

    Jaiswal, Jagdish; Lu, Guo-Liang; Jamieson, S; Lee, Ho; Abbattista, Maria; Anderson, BF; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Denny, William; Do??ate, F; Hsu, HL; Maroz, A; Pruijn, A; Puryer, M; Thompson, Aaron; Wilson, William; Smaill, Jeffrey; Patterson, Adam (2011-10-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Effect of Glycosylation on the Potency of Pramlintide, An Anti-Diabetic Drug

    Fletcher, Madeleine; Kowalczyk, Renata; Fairbanks, A; Brimble, Margaret; Hay, DL (2013-12-18)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Data acquisition and integration protocol on the Ahuahu/Great Mercury Island Archaeological Project

    Pillay, P; Barrett, Matthew; Emmitt, Joshua; Mackrell, Timothy; Phillipps, Rebecca (2017-06-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    On the Ahuahu/Great Mercury Island Project a wide range of technology is used to record large quantities of data. Laser scanners for generating 3D models of the landscape, GPS for logging points during pedestrian survey, drones capture aerial photography, tablets are used for in-field artefact registry and analysis, and total stations for recording the location of artefacts, features, deposits, and points for Terrain Irregular Networks (TINs). The use of such technology in conjunction with excavation requires a rigid workflow to maximise use of time and maintain recording standards, while minimising data loss and disruption to excavation. This workflow includes the post-field processing of data which are ultimately appended to a master relational database. Following a workflow in this way allows the efficient integration, management, and comparison of data from multiple sites across multiple field seasons.

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  • The development of a whey-based kefir beverage: Physiocochemical, sensory and microbiological characteristics

    Chan, Cheuk; Quek, Siew-Young; Roberton, AM (2007-11-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Applying threshold concepts to unlock the ???hidden??? core of a multifaceted health sciences curriculum

    Petersen, Mary; Egan, John; Barrow, Mark (2015-07-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Title: Applying threshold concepts to unlock the ???hidden??? core of a multifaceted health sciences curriculum Background/context: In 2014, a curriculum implementation plan was developed to comprehensively map the existing Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) curriculum so as to inform a cohesive workforce-related vision for the future. However, prior to mapping the curriculum, staff first needed to agree upon what the future-focused set of graduate capabilities across their diverse programme should be. To do so, we applied Meyer and Land???s (2003) notion of threshold concepts to enable us to unpack and clarify what felt like a complex, and at times hidden, core curriculum. Research/evaluation method: The existing BHSc programme was analysed using the frame of threshold concepts through a series of staff and student focus group sessions. This led to a refining of six central threshold concepts for the degree. This in turn informed the revision of a set of programme-wide graduate capabilities. Pre-review course outlines (n=24) and assessments (n=104) were analysed using thematic coding in NVivo and then mapped against the proposed graduate capabilities and thresholds for the revised BHSc. Lecturers validated these data using co-constructed matrices to explore coverage of these thesholds across the programme. At the end of 2014, teaching staff involved in the curriculum project (n=14) completed an evaluation analysing their perception of the effects of applying threshold concepts to their own development, and to their BHSc programme knowledge development. Outcomes: Evaluation results indicate that staff now report a greater common sense of purpose, increased collegiality and a more clarified overarching vision for the BHSc programme (which encompasses at least six distinct pathways of learning within the health sciences). By applying the frame of threshold concepts to the programme curriculum, many staff reported surprise that ???taken for granted??? competencies such as academic, information and professional literacies were not actually being systematically built upon across the three years of the BHSc. This has been the springboard to a programme-wide redevelopment of the BHSc core courses assisted by external health sector representatives. Additionally, two new complementary ???capstone??? courses have been planned for stage three of the programme which will more purposefully address real-world, essential graduate capabilities. How the conference sub-themes are addressed (200 words): This poster focuses centrally on conference theme one by exploring how threshold concepts can assist the process of establishing what capabilities are required of (BHSc) graduates and how we can ensure these are responsive to (health) sector needs. It highlights examples from practice in the Bachelor of Health Sciences programme. We first show how an overarching programme purpose was reframed in conjunction with external sector input by utilising Meyer & Land???s notion of threshold concepts. Next we illustrate examples of effective tools and processes (co-constructed matrices) that were applied by academic staff to shed light on gaps and overlaps in existing core course content and assessment tasks. Related to this we address questions from conference theme three concerned with how we can assess, embed and evaluate these graduate capabilities once we have mapped them across our courses. Examples also illustrate the processes utilised in designing stage three ???capstone??? courses to embed and assess these graduate capabilities.

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  • Similar estimates of contrast sensitivity and acuity from psychophysics and automated analysis of optokinetic nystagmus

    Dakin, Steven; Turnbull, Philip (2016-05-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is a particularly useful way of characterising functional vision, its psychophysical measurement relies on observers being able to make reliable perceptual reports. This can be challenging e.g. when testing children. Here we describe a system for measuring the CSF without observer-report using an automated analysis of optokinetic nystagmus (OKN), an oscillatory eye movement made in response to moving stimuli (here, spatial-frequency - SF - band-pass noise). We show that predicting perceived direction using the proportion of eye movements that are consistent with OKN in the stimulus direction allows us to make an unbiased estimate of contrast sensitivity across SF. We next compare CSFs of 25 observers derived using either OKN or perceptual report. Both approaches yield near-identical CSFs that capture subtle inter-observer variations in acuity (R=0.80, p< 0.0001) and contrast sensitivity (R=0.80, p< 0.0001) amongst observers with ostensibly normal vision. A trial-by-trial analysis reveals that, even when observers' perceptual report is at chance, there is a very high correlation between our OKN-derived measure and observers' perceptual report. This indicates that OKN and self-report are likely tapping into a common neural mechanism providing further support for the proposal that OKN is a valid alternative to the current gold standard measures of CSF based on perceptual report. We discuss how our approach can be paired with an efficient psychophysical method to derive rapid automated measures of the CSF and other measures of functional vision.

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