280 results for Conference poster

  • Polyamine diamide orthidine F as a potent and selective antimalarial lead compound

    Liew, Lydia; Kaiser, M; Copp, B (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    THE POLYAMINE DIAMIDE ORTHIDINE F AS A POTENT AND SELECTIVE ANTIMALARIAL LEAD COMPOUND Orthidine F (1) was isolated from an extract of the marine organism Aplidium orthium, found at Three Kings Islands, New Zealand.1 An initial screen of the natural product 1 against a panel of parasitic protozoa (Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania donovani and Plasmodium falciparum K1 dual drug-resistant strain) identified selective inhibitory activity for T. brucei rhodesiense (IC50 78 ??M) against T. cruzi, no detectable activity towards L. donovani and moderate activity against P. falciparum. Furthermore, the natural product was found to be non-toxic in the non-malignant L6 rat myoblast cell line, thus representing an attractive target as an antiparasitic drug. A preliminary structure-activity relationship (SAR) study identified analogues with a similar activity profile to the natural product. The analogues were found to exhibit moderate inhibitory activity against T. brucei rhodesiense (IC50 3.2???210 ??M), more potent inhibitory activity against P. falciparum (IC50 0.0086???0.61 ??M), and no significant activity against T. cruzi and L. donovani. The analogues also continued to display little or no cytotoxic effect in the L6 cell line, this combined with the potent IC50 values obtained for inhibition of P. falciparum afforded a series of analogues with impressive properties which warranted further studies. This led to a second series of analogues with the intention of improving its antimalarial activity. The analogues generated from this exercise exhibited potent in vitro activities (IC50 0.0086???0.61 ??M) while retaining selectivity against P. falciparum. Three analogues were selected based on the in vitro data obtained and evaluated for in vivo activity in the Plasmodium berghei mouse model of malaria; which in this instance did not yield significant activity.

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  • fMRI Measures of the Dorsal Visual Cortex Correlates with Behavioral Performance and Cortical Thickness

    Poppe, Tanya; Leung, Myra; Tottman, Anna; Harding, Jane; Bloomfield, Francis; Alsweiler, Jane; Thompson, Benjamin (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Pretraining effects on cognitive load in authentic settings when learning complex science ideas?

    Haslam, Carolyn; Hamilton, Richard (2015-08-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    High cognitive load is often a consequence of learning complex ideas in science. One approach to reducing cognitive load when learning complex material is ??pretraining?? which involves the presentation of the information essential for understanding the concepts in two stages: Stage 1 - present names and characteristics of the main parts or ideas to provide the learners with some prior knowledge but no understanding of the concepts; Stage 2 - present material required for full understanding of the concepts. This study assessed the impact of pretraining on the efficiency of learning of basic graphing skills and complex physics concepts within actual classrooms. 495 students participated in this study and were given either pretraining and a power-point presentation, just the power-point presentation, or the power-point presentation twice. The pretraining group reported lower subjective cognitive load scores, greater improvement from pre to posttest and greater efficiency in learning (i.e., effective use of mental effort while learning) than the other two treatments. This supports the usefulness of pretraining as a strategy to reduce cognitive load and enhance learning within authentic settings.

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  • Sick unto death: Barriers and facilitators to M??ori access to primary care in New Zealand

    Reid, Jennifer (2013-04-16)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • So what does linking computational models with clinical data mean and how to do it?

    Atalag, Koray; Kalbasi, R; Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Nickerson, David; Warren, James; Cooling, M; Hunter, Peter (2017-02-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Linking computational physiology models with clinical data has been proposed to help real-world model validation as well as enable personalised and predictive clinical decision support systems. Electronic health records (EHR) are sinks of biomedical knowledge and include manifestations of genomic and environmental aspects that impact on biological systems. We describe how to use openEHR to normalise, annotate and link clinical data with computational models.

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  • Bridging Computational Modelling and Clinical Information using openEHR and Semantic Web

    Atalag, Koray; Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Kalbasi, R; Cooling, Michael; Nickerson, David; Hunter, Peter (2016-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Linking clinical data to computational physiology is a crucial step for personalised and predictive Medicine. Electronic health records (EHR) embody quantifiable manifestations of genetic and environmental effects that impact on biological systems. Recent attempts to enable this linkage heavily rely on semantic technologies however in the world of EHRs Semantic Web has very limited use. openEHR provides open engineering specifications and tooling to tackle health data which supports Semantic Web. We are setting up an openEHR-based research data repository at ABI to normalise and annotate clinical and experimental data with an aim to integrate with the Physiome Model Repository (PMR).

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  • Annotation of Clinical Datasets Using openEHR Archetypes

    Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Atalag, Koray; De Bono, Bernard; Hunter, Peter (2015-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bridging the Computational Modelling and EHR standards using openEHR and Semantic Web Technology

    Atalag, Koray; Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Cooling, Michael; Nickerson, David (2015-10-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Linking clinical data to computational physiology will enable real-world model validation as well as the possibility of personalised and population level predictive decision support tools. Electronic health records (EHR) embody quantifiable manifestations of genomic and environmental aspects that impact on biological systems when clinical data are structured. However data quality and semantic interoperability remains a major challenge in the world of EHRs. In the computational physiology domain recent attempts to enable semantic interoperability heavily rely on Semantic Web technologies and utilise ontology-based annotations (e.g. RICORDO) but a wealth of useful information and knowledge sits in EHRs where Semantic Web technologies have very limited use. openEHR provides a set of an open engineering specifications that provides a canonical health record architecture and open source tooling to support data collection and integration. Core openEHR specifications have also been adopted by ISO and CEN making it a full international standard which underpins many national programs and has multi-vendor implementations worldwide. Our work describes how to use openEHR to normalise, annotate and link clinical data with biophysical models by using openEHR Archetypes as semantic pointers to underlying clinical concepts in EHR.

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  • Phagocytosis by human brain pericytes: implications for Alzheimer???s disease

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Scotter, Emma; Smyth, L; Park, In; Curtis, Maurice; Faull, Richard; Graham, S; Dragunow, Michael (2016-06-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A randomized controlled trial of Triple P Online for parents of hyperactive/ inattentive pre-schoolers

    Franke, Nike; Keown, Louise; Sanders, M (2015-03-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • What???s on the INSIDE matters - exploring and characterising the 'Thin on the Outside Fat on the Inside' profile across ethnicities: the TOFI_Asia study

    Sequeira, Ivana; Yip, Wilson; Lu, Louise; Poppitt, Sally (2016-10-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Life's a beach: A proposal for investigating New Zealand's wrack communities

    Le Grice, Rebecca (2017-04-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Investigation into the racemic X-ray structure of the antimicrobial protein snakin-1

    Yeung, Ho; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher; Harris, Paul; Baker, Edward; Brimble, Margaret (2015-10-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Loop closure and kinase selectivity in lung cancer

    Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher (2016-07-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Somatic mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors that causes aberrant signalling have been implicated in the development of lung cancer. Two such receptors, EGFR and FGFR kinases are directly involved in many cases of aggressive metastasis and drug resistance. The FGFR kinase family consists of four highly conserved receptor proteins (FGFR1 ??? FGFR4). FGFR pathways are the main cause of resistance to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer patients, and 22% of them show over-expression of FGFR1. There are a number of small molecules in phase III clinical trials that target not only FGFR but also other kinases. A wide range of EGFR mutations are linked to lung cancer development in never-smokers or former smokers. The two most common mutations are exon 19 deletions and the point mutation L858R in exon 21. Many patients harbouring L858R acquire a secondary T790M mutation after treatment with gefitinib/erlotinib resulting in drug resistance. In the past few years AstraZeneca have developed drugs that target specific proteins, eg; AZD4547 (FGFR1 selective) and AZD9291 (selectivity for T790M/L858R EGFR). In an effort to design our own novel and selective inhibitors, we solved the structures of AZD4547 and AZD9291 in complex with FGFR and EGFR respectively. In both cases, the phosphate binding loop (P-loop) of the proteins forms an unusual ???bent??? structure wrapped closely around these inhibitors. We speculate that the ability of these compounds to induce P-loop closure is an important part of their respective selectivity mechanisms.

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  • C/EBP?? Expression in Primary Human Glial Cells

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Smith, AM; Park, In; Jansson, Deidre; Dragunow, Michael (2013-08-26)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Insulin and IGF1 modulate PSA-NCAM turnover in a process involving specific extracellular matrix components

    Monzo, HJ; Park, TIH; Dieriks, Birger; Jansson, Deidre; Dragunow, Michael; Curtis, Maurice (2014-07-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The effect of aspirin and smoking on excretion of lactulose and mannitol in fit young women: Towards an aspirin augmented test of gut permeability

    Sequeira, Ivana; Lentle, RG; Kruger, MC; Hurst, RD (2012-07-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The experience of spiritual pain for dying migrants away from birth country

    Bray, Yvonne; Goodyear-Smith, F; Wright-St Clair, V (2017-05-18)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Spiritual pain can be linked with aspects of life meaning, culture and religion that arise for address in the dying period. Population demographics in New Zealand mirror most developed countries in showing a rise in the ageing population statistics and a projected increase in ethnic diversity. These statistics will impact palliative care, and the needs of the migrant population will require a deeper understanding of what it means to have a life-threatening/end-of-life illness. Migrants face challenges of living and integrating into a new society. Coupled with an end-of-life illness, this can impact their quality of living and dying immeasurably. Aims This study sought to ask dying migrants what their experience and thoughts were on dying away from their country of birth/origin. Methods Ten migrants in end-of-life were recruited through hospices for this phenomenological study. Their stories were interpreted using the Heideggerian notion of ???being??? in the end-of-life ???clearing??? to understand their experiences of dying in adoptive country. Results Three prominent notions were identified from the stories for discussion. The first notion emerged of the participants contemplating identity and belonging as a direct result of having lived in two countries, and the experienced differences between both. The second notion identified the participants as being in life review. The third notion noted their positions in seeking resolution and transformation. Discussion A vision for the future for this group of people would be to optimise their quality of dying. The implications for palliative care and other health practitioners who care for ageing and sick migrants include a need for awareness and a deep understanding of the experienced discord that may be present. An approach in care that facilitates resolution of this dissonance can improve the dying experience for migrants and their families. This study was funded by the researcher for PhD study.

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  • Investigation into the racemic X-ray structure of the antimicrobial protein snakin-1

    Yeung, Ho; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher; Harris, Paul; Baker, Edward; Brimble, Margaret (2015-08-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Snakin-1 is a 63 residue antimicrobial protein originally isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum).1 It is active against a number of bacterial and fungal phytopathogens such as Clavibacter michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae and Fusarium solani. Snakin-1 is a member of the GASA (gibberellic acid stimulated in Arabidopsis)/snakin family and the mature protein consists of a GASA domain incorporating six intramolecular disulfide bonds.2 The amino acid sequences of these proteins do not correspond to any known structural motifs. GASA/snakin proteins are found in a variety of plant species and appear to be involved in a range of functions including cell elongation and cell division.2 Their expression profiles support these roles and are commonly linked to development.2 It has also been speculated that the 12 conserved cysteines in these proteins perform a role in redox regulation.2 We have recently completed the total chemical synthesis of native Snakin-1 and showed that its antimicrobial activity is comparable to that of the naturally occurring protein.3 In an attempt to understand how this small protein functions we have determined its threedimensional structure by X-ray crystallography using a quasi-racemic protein system.4 Phase information for structural determination was obtained by radiation-damage induced phasing.5 The structure of snakin-1 appears to be novel, different to known classes of cysteine-rich plant antimicrobial peptide. Its features include a large and distinctly electropositive loop that we speculate to be membrane targeting, and a two helix bundle which is a potential membrane-interacting feature able to disrupt the structural integrity of its target bacteria.

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  • Estado nutricional de los ind??genas Patax?? de 5 aldeas de Minas Gerais, Brasil (Nutritional status of the indigenopus Pataxo from Minas Gerias, Brazil).

    Gontijo de Castro, Teresa; Oliveira, SNLG; Mazzetti, CMS; Conde, WL; Leite, MS; Pimenta, AM (2012-11-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introducci??n: En las ??ltimas d??cadas los estudios brasile??os sobre el estado nutricional no incluyeron la poblaci??n ind??gena como un segmento de an??lisis, generando brechas de informaciones para el direccionamiento de pol??ticas de alimentaci??n y nutrici??n para el grupo. Objetivo: Evaluar el estado nutricional de los ind??genas Patax?? de 5 aldeas de Minas Gerais. Metodolog??a: Estudio transversal que evalu?? 257 ind??genas (87,4% del total) en 2011. El peso y la altura fueran evaluados conforme las orientaciones de la OMS. La circunferencia de la cintura (CC) fue tomada en el punto medio entre la cresta il??aca y la ??ltima costilla. Las clasificaciones nutricionales fueron hechas a partir de los ??ndices altura para edad (A/E), ??ndice de masa corporal para edad (IMC/E), ??ndice de masa corporal (IMC) y CC, utilizando las referencias de la OMS y de Lipschitz (para ancianos). Resultados: Fueron evaluados 70 ni??os (27,3%), 59 adolescentes (23,0%), 116 adultos (45,0%) y 12 ancianos (4,7 %). Ninguno de los ni??os present?? d??ficit para A/E, 1,4% presentaron bajo IMC/E y 2,9% peso elevado para IMC/E. Fue observado d??ficit de altura en 3,4% de los adolescentes y peso excesivo (IMC/E) en 8,5%. Altas prevalencias de sobrepeso/obesidad y valores elevados de CC fueron apuntados para adultos (56,0% y 56,8 %, respectivamente) y ancianos (25,0% y 75%, respectivamente). Conclusi??n: Se destacan el exceso de peso en la poblaci??n de forma ascendente desde la ni??ez y la baja frecuencia de d??ficits nutricionales entre ni??os y adolescentes. Financiaci??n: Funda????o de Amparo ?? Pesquisa do Estado de Minas Gerais.

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