280 results for Conference poster

  • High Pressure and Thermal Processing of kiwifruit puree: the effect on antioxidants and vitamin C

    Soloman, N; Oliveira, Maria (2011-11-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Giving research global reach: ResearchSpace@Auckland

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Hayes, Leonie (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A key part of the academic research process is publishing the results – ‘getting it out there’. An institutional repository such as ResearchSpace@Auckland provides authors with a channel for near-instantaneous worldwide dissemination of research. ResearchSpace@Auckland at the University of Auckland was initially developed under the umbrella of the Institutional Repositories Aotearoa (Ira) Project. The project between Auckland, Canterbury and Victoria Universities used DSpace Open Source Software and was funded by the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC). The project was completed in 2007. ResearchSpace is now a full production system with seamless Disaster Recovery ability, which allows authors to submit their work confident that it will be secure. ResearchSpace contains ‘research outputs’ from the University of Auckland’s staff and students, including theses, papers and reports. From 2007 it is a requirement for all enrolling PhD students to submit a digital copy of their thesis upon completion. The PhD collection has grown from an initial 200 items at the beginning of 2007 to nearly 1700 items. 775 of these are open-access. This has been achieved via a retrospective digitization project for all PhD theses and a campaign to contact the authors for permission. Key features of ResearchSpace • Authors submit their own content initially (self-submission), administrators check content and publish it online • Most content is freely available to any user – use is not restricted to members of the institution or subscribers • Durable & Permanent URLs: we use ‘Handles’. e.g. http://hdl.handle.net/2292/1430. A handle does not have the institution’s domain name in the URL, if the website is changed or moved, the URL will still go to the correct location. • Preservation: creating digital files allows creation of a new print copy if necessary. Thesis files are in Portable Document Format (PDF), and the library has undertaken to keep the formats up to date, as technology may change in the future.

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  • New sugar agents for the control of undesirable microbes in the food industry

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Neves, A; Rauter, AP (2007-11-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Purine nucleosides as new agents for the control of Alzheimer’s disease

    Oliveira, Maria; Marcelo, F; Justino, J; Jacob, AP; Bleriot, Y; Sinay, P; Goulart, M; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Getting Research 'Out There': ResearchSpace@Auckland

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Laurie, John; Hayes, Leonie (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A key part of the academic research process is publishing the results – ‘getting it out there’. An institutional repository such as ResearchSpace@Auckland provides authors with a channel for near-instantaneous worldwide dissemination of research. ResearchSpace@Auckland has been developed at the University of Auckland under the umbrella of the Institutional Repositories Aotearoa Project (Ira). Built using DSpace Open Source Software, the repository contains ‘research outputs’ from the University of Auckland’s staff and students, including theses, papers and reports. The PhD thesis collection is the flagship of the repository – electronic submission is compulsory for all completing PhD students from 2011. The initial 200 items in the PhD thesis collection were gathered by contacting authors of theses submitted at the University of Auckland since 2001 and inviting them to submit digital copies and consent forms. Trials are underway to digitize theses that are unavailable in digital format. The mandating of compulsory submission for PhD theses submitted at the University of Auckland ensures regulatory requirements for digital deposit are catered for. Other collections for articles, papers, and images are being developed.

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  • Registry of BioBricks models using CellML

    Rouilly, Vincent; Canton, Barry; Nielsen, Poul; Kitney, Richard (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. One of the main goals in Synthetic Biology is to assess the feasibility of building novel biological systems from interchangeable and standardized parts. In order to collect and share parts, a Registry of standardized DNA BioBricks http://parts.mit.edu/registry has been established at the MIT. BioBricks can be assembled to form devices and systems to operate in living cells. Design of reliable devices and systems would benefit from accurate models of system function. To predict the function of systems built from many parts, we need to have accurate models for the parts and mechanisms to easily compose those part models into a system model. Therefore, in parallel to increasing the number of parts available and characterising them experimentally, a logical extension to the Registry would be to build a Registry of BioBrick models to complement the physical parts.

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  • Space-Time Multi-Resolution Banded Graph-Cut for Fast Segmentation. (Conference Poster)

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Gruber, Daniel; Wedel, Andreas; Klappstein, Jens (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 30th Annual Symposium of the German Association for Pattern Recognition DAGM Munich, Germany, June 2008. http://www.dagm2008.org/ Applying real-time segmentation is a major issue when processing every frame of image sequences. In this paper, we propose a modi cation of the well known graph-cut algorithm to improve speed for discrete segmentation. Our algorithm yields real-time segmentation, using graph-cut, by performing a single cut on an image with regions of di erent resolutions, combining space-time pyramids and narrow bands. This is especially suitable for image sequences, as segment borders in one image are re ned in the next image. The fast computation time allows one to use information contained in every image frame of an input image stream at 20 Hz, on a standard PC. The algorithm is applied to traf- c scenes, using a monocular camera installed in a moving vehicle. Our results show the segmentation of moving objects with similar results to standard graph-cut, but with improved speed.

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  • Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Wedel, Andreas; Rabe, Clemens; Klappstein, Jens; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand. IVCNZ 08. Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ The detection of moving objects is a crucial part of driver assistance systems. This paper tackles this issue using computer vision. Two approaches are investigated, monocular and stereoscopic. The base principals and implementational issues are discussed and detailed, high- lighting areas of concern. In both cases, the detection is based on motion analysis of individually tracked image points (optical ow). The monoc- ular approach relies solely on the optical ow, where as the stereoscopic approach also takes stereo depth information into account. In both ap- proaches the motion analysis provides a motion metric which corresponds to the likelihood that the tracked point is moving. Based on this metric the points are segmented into objects by employing the globally op- timal graph cut algorithm. These approaches are then compared and contrasted using real-world vehicle image sequences.

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  • An Approach for Evaluating Robustness of Edge Operators using Real-World Driving Scenes

    Al-Sarraf, Ali; Vaudrey, Tobi; Klette, Reinhard; Woo, Young Woon (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ Over the past 20 years there have been many papers that compare and evaluate di erent edge operators. Most of them focus on accuracy and also do comparisons against synthetic data. This paper focuses on real-world driver assistance scenes and does a comparison based on robustness. The three edge operators compared are Sobel, Canny and the under-publicized phase-based Kovesi-Owens operator. The Kovesi- Owens operator has the distinct advantage that it uses one pre-selected set of parameters and can work across almost any type of scene, where as other operators require parameter tuning. The results from our comparison show that the Kovesi-Owens operator is the most robust of the three, and can get decent results, even under weak illumination and varying gradients in the images. Keywords: edge operators, edge robustness evaluation, Kovesi-Owens, phase operators

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  • Apple Waste Preservation for Extraction of Antioxidants

    Zhan, D; Oliveira, Maria; Saleh, Z (2015-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A huge amount of apple waste is generated from juice, cider and other apple product industries. This waste represents a cost and causes environmental problems. Apple waste is a rich source of polyphenolic compounds, mostly found in the apple peels and cores. Polyphenols are antioxidants with high value that can be extracted from the waste and exploited commercially. Proper methods of waste pasteurisation would allow its preservation and reduce waste degradation. In this study, diluted apple waste was pasteurised using three different technologies: thermal processing (TP), high pressure processing (HPP) and low pressure assisted thermal processing. The effect of processing on the waste native yeasts and moulds, inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and antioxidants were investigated. TP at 60, 80 and 100 °C for 30 min, HPP at 300, 400 and 500 MPa for 10 min and 600 MPa for 20 min, and low pressure assisted thermal processing at 60, 80 and 100 °C with 2 MPa for 30 min were carried out. The total yeasts and moulds initially in the diluted apple waste was about 6.6×101 cfu/g, which was fully inactivated by the three technologies. S. cerevisiae inoculated in the waste was reduced by 5-log or more with all processing methods/conditions. HPP and low pressure assisted thermal processing treatments did not affect the antioxidant activity (DPPH-radical scavenging). However, both TPC and DPPH radical scavenging decreased with TP (p < 0.05). The results of this study can be helpful for designing appropriate conditions to pasteurise fruit industry byproducts for further extraction of high value antioxidants.

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  • Baby, Baby: Pregnant Again After Postnatal Depression

    Cowie, Susan (2008-09-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Depression following birth has wide ranging impacts on the woman, her new baby and her family. Studies indicate that treatment has been effective in shortening the duration of depression but does not prevent the increased risk of experiencing depression following another birth. This study explores in detail women’s and practitioners understandings of first time mother’s experiences of and recovery from depression and then focus on how the women prepare for and make sense of the experience of second time pregnancy and motherhood. It is hoped to develop strategies to reduce recurrence and impact of depression in women with young children. Results are presented of interviews with 25 women who had previously experienced post natal depression. Interviews were conducted 3-6 months before birth, focusing firstly on how the women make sense of their transition to first time motherhood and coping with/recovery from depression and secondly, on their expectations of second time birth and motherhood. The second interview, completed 3 months after birth, focused on their experience of the pregnancy, birth, and life with another child. Qualitative methodologies were employed. Of particular interest were the things that women described as helpful and unhelpful, their understanding of the help/treatment (e.g. Home help, CBT, support group, Arapax) they had gained and how this influenced their decisions and coping second time round. Preliminary analyses, particularly of time one data (collection complete), are reported and issues related to the study design and implementation are discussed.

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  • New antifungal and antibacterial compounds: 1,3-oxazoline- and 1,3-oxazolidine-2-thiones

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Silva, S; Tatibouet, A; Rollin, P; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Collaborative Problem Solving for Do-ers and Teachers of Mathematics

    Sheryn, Sarah; Frankcom, G; Ledger, G (2014-11-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study sought to explore and analyse the phenomenon of maths anxiety within a real-life context, and to identify if levels of maths anxiety can be reduced through participation in a reciprocal teaching process. This poster presents a small element of the larger study, which investigated how to reduce maths anxiety in teacher candidates. Maths anxiety is a well-researched phenomenon that is known to impede the successful mathematics teaching and learning experiences of some teacher candidates. The maths anxiety these students bring to their mathematics education courses results in poor quality mathematics teaching (Biddulph 1999; Frankcom 2006; Sloan 2010). Mathematics education lecturers have become increasingly aware of how some students become visibly anxious when they walk into the mathematics classroom, and/or are asked to collaborate to solve mathematical problems. These observations are supported by the level of maths anxiety reported by these students. The model developed for this study was informed by the work of Palinscar and Brown (1984) and complemented by problem-solving models from Mullis, et al. (2008), Reilly, Parsons and Bortolot (2009), and Polya (1945). The Revised Reciprocal Teaching Model (RRTM) was designed is to facilitate teacher candidates’ access to mathematical practices used in schools, and simultaneously develop their personal mathematical knowledge and understanding. Cognisant of the problem solving and peer mentoring literature, researchers provided opportunities for graduates to develop adaptive expertise. While peer mentoring is thoroughly established in literacy education it is under-researched within mathematics education. Reciprocal teaching falls within this area of research and provides a framework for individuals to mutually support each other while learning. The RRTM was developed to promote discourse within mathematical communities in an attempt to reduce maths anxiety. The implementation of the RRTM was through a two-phased structured framework, designed to take place over a university calendar year. The framework began with specific training of peer mentors who in turn worked with assigned mentees. The second phase promoted less reliance on the peer mentors and resulted in the students forming their own peer mentoring groups outside of class time. Results suggest that the model has a positive effect on students’ ability to confidently talk about and solve mathematical problems. This is evidenced by the decrease in maths anxiety levels self-reported by teacher candidates. This research indicates the RRTM has the potential to reduce maths anxiety levels of teacher candidates and produce confident do-ers and teachers of mathematics.

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  • Measuring the electrical impedance of mouse brain cortex

    Wilson, MT; Elbohouty, M; Lin, Oliver; Voss, LJ; Jones, K; Steyn-Ross, DA (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We report on an experimental method to measure conductivity of cortical tissue. We use a pair of 5mm diameter Ag/AgCl electrodes in a Perspex sandwich device that can be brought to a distance of 400 microns apart. The apparatus is brought to uniform temperature before use. Electrical impedance of a sample is measured across the frequency range 20 Hz-2.0 MHz with an Agilent 4980A four-point impedance monitor in a shielded room. The equipment has been used to measure the conductivity of mature mouse brain cortex in vitro. Slices 400 microns in thickness are prepared on a vibratome. Slices are bathed in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) to keep them alive. Slices are removed from the ACSF and sections of cortical tissue approximately 2 mm times 2 mm are cut with a razor blade. The sections are photographed through a calibrated microscope to allow identification of their cross-sectional areas. Excess ACSF is removed from the sample and the sections places between the electrodes. The impedance is measured across the frequency range and electrical conductivity calculated. Results show two regions of dispersion. A low frequency region is evident below approximately 10 kHz, and a high frequency dispersion above this. Results at the higher frequencies show a good fit to the Cole-Cole model of impedance of biological tissue; this model consists of resistive and non-linear capacitive elements. Physically, these elements are likely to arise due to membrane polarization and migration of ions both intra- and extra-cellularly.

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  • Use of Accelerated Laboratory Evaluation by Extended Nurse Prescribers: A tool to improve practice?

    Cameron, Marie (2007-11-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bacground – Because of the link between inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and antibiotic resistance, several strategies have been implemented to decrease inappropriate prescribing and improve prescribing practices. As 80% of antibiotic prescribing takes place in primary care, this area has often been the focus of these attempts. An example of such a strategy is the Accelerated Bacteriological Laboratory Evaluation (ABLE) service in Grampian, which provides an overnight microbiology results service. Aim - To describe the knowledge and use of the Accelerated Bacteriological Laboratory Evaluation (ABLE) service by Extended Nurse Prescribers in Grampian (UK). Methodology – Quantitative - Anonymous, self-completed, postal questionnaire of all regional Extended Nurse Prescribers, informed by a preliminary content-setting focus group. Analysis – Descriptive statistics (thematic analysis of focus group). Key Findings – Response rate was 74% (35/47) and 57% (20) of respondents were practice nurses. Eighty nine percent (31) of respondents knew about the ABLE service, and 88% (30) had used it, with 73% (22) using it often. Over half of respondents (55%) stated that they had insufficient information to allow them to make best use of the service. The main barrier to ABLE use was difficulty accessing results (50%/6). The main motivator for ABLE use was the desire to prescribe the correct antibiotic (71%/17). Conclusions – Although the majority of respondents were aware of the ABLE service and have used it, more information at more regular intervals is needed to encourage maximal use. Respondents were more likely to use the service for some conditions than others. Inclusion of information about ABLE in the Extended Nurse Prescribing course followed by regular postal and/or electronic reminders/updates would be preferred. These changes and the expansion of accelerated laboratory evaluation nationwide may help to reduce and improve prescribing practices.

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  • Methodology to set up minimum pasteurisation conditions for high acid shelf-stable foods

    Oliveira, Maria; Gibbs, PA (2007-11-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Body composition and Metabolic changes after Sequential VLED and Bariatric surgery in .

    McGill, Anne-Thea; Chan, YK; Plank, L; McLeod, B; Beban, G; Falk, S; Wiessing, K; Poppitt, SD; Cooper, GJS (2010-07-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    3. Anne-Thea McGill¹,Yih-Kai Chan, Lindsay Plank, Briar McLeod, Grant Beban, Sofie Falk, Katy Wiessing, Sally D Poppitt, Garth JS Cooper. Body composition and Metabolic changes after Sequential VLED and Bariatric surgery in women. T2:PO.33. Obesity Reviews, Volume 11, Issue 1, Pages iii-iv, 1-502, July 2010 Special Issue Abstracts of the 11th International Congress on Obesity, 11-15 July 2010, Stockholm, Sweden

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  • Mitochondrial Respiration in Skeletal Muscle of Obese Women Prior To Bariatric Surgery and Following Six Months of Weight Loss

    MacDonald, J; McGill, Anne-Thea; Hickey, A; Plank, L; McLeod, B; Falk, S; Wiessing, K; Beban, G; Chan, YK; Xin, Liping; Cooper, GJS; Poppitt, SD (2010-07-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Nonlinear dynamics of an electronic model of one-way coupling in one and two dimensions

    Doud, AB; Breen, Barbara; Grimm, JR; Tanasse, AH; Tanasse, SJ; Lindner, JF; Maxted, K (2011-03-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    One-way or unidirectional coupling is a striking example of how topological considerations -- the parity of an array of multistable elements combined with periodic boundary conditions -- can qualitatively influence dynamics. Here we introduce a simple electronic model of one-way coupling in one and two dimensions and experimentally compare it to an improved mechanical model and an ideal mathematical model. In two dimensions, computation and experiment reveal richer one-way coupling phenomenology: in media where two-way coupling would dissipate all excitations, one-way coupling enables soliton-like waves to propagate in different directions with different speeds.

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  • Probing Student Approaches and Engagement in Learning Chemistry at University.

    Salter, David; Simpson, MC; Hamilton, R (2011-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This project aims to identify students’ learning approaches, engagement, attitudes and success in chemistry classes that are service-taught as part of a specified health sciences programme and in chemistry classes that are taught as part of a chemistry major programme. It seeks to determine whether any differences exist in the learning approaches, motivational orientation and engagement, and compare the success of a cohort of students who are required to enrol in a compulsory chemistry course as part of a health sciences degree with that of a cohort of students who choose to enrol in a chemistry course with the possible intention of majoring in chemistry. It is intended that both cognitive and motivational individual difference variables are identified and relationships between students’ goal orientation and university academic success evaluated.

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