277 results for Conference poster

  • Doped Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) coated surfaces to reduce fouling from milk

    Patel, Jaiminkumar; Bansal, B; Jones, MI; Hyland, M (2010-11-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In the dairy industry, fouling of processing surfaces is a common and unresolved problem. Surface modification, for example through the application of a surface coating, can alter the surface properties of a material, and may be a potential way to reduce fouling. Typical dairy plant stainless steel surfaces were modified by the deposition of doped Diamond-Like Carbon (DLC) films with varying concentration of doped elements. These modified surfaces were studied for their fouling behavior with milk at both laboratory and pilot scale. None of the doped DLC modified surfaces investigated in the study presented benefits in fouling reduction as compared to unmodified surface.

    View record details
  • The development of online learning environments (OLEs) at The University of Auckland Library: collaboration, integration and usability testing

    Zdravkovic, Neda (2013-04-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In order to meet the learning needs of a large number of in-house, flexible learning and distance-learning students from a variety of disciplines, The University of Auckland Library has enhanced the provision of information and academic literacy instruction through the design of online learning environments. Learning Services Librarians, learning designers and subject librarians from The University of Auckland Library have collaborated with faculty, Centre for Academic Development staff, graphic design professionals and web developers to design online courses and tutorials, such as: • Academic Integrity - stand-alone online academic integrity course, compulsory for all new students at the University of Auckland from Semester I 2013; • COMLAW 101: New Zealand’s Legal Framework - curriculum- integrated information literacy online tutorial designed for COMLAW 101: Law in a Business Environment academic course with 2000 students each year; • POPLHLTH 701: Research Methods in Health - curriculum- integrated online information literacy learning environment for postgraduate students completing the POPLHLTH 701: Research Methods in Health course and compulsory assessment activity bearing 15% course mark; • FTVMS 100: Assignment Research Path – curriculum-integrated information literacy online tutorial and compulsory assessment activity (10% course mark) designed for FTVMS 100: Media studies first year undergraduate course with 1000 students each year; • Understanding Your Reading List - generic information literacy online tutorial designed for all first year undergraduate students. The focus of the paper will be on the development framework of online courses, curriculum-integrated and generic tutorials and the analysis of different stages of each project, their collaborative nature and usability testing practices applied (user observation, focus group interviews, surveys) and outcomes. It will introduce CourseBuilder as a web-based tool for the design of online learning environments and activities, its features, functionalities and published outputs. CourseBuilder, developed by the University of Auckland’s Centre for Academic Development, is an authoring tool that provides customisable templates to develop online interactive activities (eg, case studies, reflections and quizzes), import text, insert media, monitor student responses and more. Finally the paper will describe issues and challenges during each development stage, as well as benefits and limitations of using an online learning environment development system.

    View record details
  • Retrospective host specificity testing of Cotesia urabae to assess the risk posed to the New Zealand nolid moth Celama parvitis

    Avila Olesen, Gonzalo; Withers, TM; Holwell, GI (2014-08-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Additional retrospective testing of the gum leaf skeletoniser (Uraba lugens) biological control agent Cotesia urabae was conducted against the endemic moth Celama parvitis. Although this native was included in host specificity testing before EPA approved the parasitoid's release, this work aimed to increase the sample size to better assess the potential risk posed. The effect that different periods of host deprivation and prior oviposition experience had on the parasitoid's readiness to attack, was examined in a sequence of no-choice tests. No parasitoids emerged from the 52% of larvae that survived to pupation, thus, confirming C. parvitis as a non-host. Dissections of larvae that died during laboratory rearing revealed that 63% had contained a parasitoid, but no C. urabae parasitoid larvae developed beyond the second instar. Significant differences were found in the attack times according to the parasitoid's deprivation levels (age), and it was also observed that the duration until first attack significantly decreased after each non-target presentation.

    View record details
  • The Regional Structure of Technical Innovation

    O'Neale, DR; Hendy, SC (2014-06-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is strong evidence that the productivity per capita of cities and regions increases with population. One likely factor behind this phenomenon is agglomeration; densely populated regions are able to bring together otherwise unlikely combinations of individuals and organisations with diverse, specialised capabilities. But clearly not all possible combinations of capability are equally valuable, nor are they equally likely. In order to investigate patterns in the typical combinations of capabilities, we have used the REGPAT patent database to construct a bipartite network of geographic regions and the patent classes for which those regions display a revealed comparative advantage. By identifying the pairs of patent classes that are most likely to co-occur within regions, we can infer relationships between the classes, giving a new network that maps out the structure of technical innovation. The resulting network has a core-periphery structure with a central group of highly connected technologies surrounded by branches of more specialised combinations. We investigate measures such as the diversity of regional patent portfolios and the ubiquity of patent classes across regions. We find that diversity is positively correlated with regional population, while the average ubiquity of patents in a region’s patent portfolio is negatively correlated. This suggests that more populous regions are able to expand into more specialised and higher value parts of the patent network.

    View record details
  • Sequence Coverage Abnormalities and Sex-Specific Autosomal Regions in Cattle

    Lopdell, Thomas; Harland, C; Johnson, T; Keehan, M (2012-08-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Detection of tissue- and sex-specific gene expression in Bos taurus using high depth RNA sequencing

    Lopdell, Thomas; Littlejohn, M (2013-08-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Bacterially mediated manganese deposition in novel "anelli" within the biofilms of an impacted urban stream

    Smith, JP; Lewis, Gillian (2007-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The purpose of this work is to identify bacteria responsible for the formation of manganese containing anelli within stream biofilms, and study their distribution. Manganese oxidising bacteria are part of a diverse group of organisms found commonly within many disparate environments, which deposit manganese and iron biominerals within biofilms and flocs [1]. The purpose of microbial manganese oxidation is poorly understood, but may be associated with energy production, mobilisation of nutrients, protection and/or detoxification [1, 2]. Manganese has a high sorptive capacity for heavy metals, metalloids, and other ions, as well as a strong oxidizing potential, and therefore frequently induces co-precipitation of cations present within the surrounding environment [1]. Within urban streams contaminants such as heavy metals may therefore potentially be concentrated within steam biofilms in the presence of manganese oxidising bacteria.

    View record details
  • Effects of Storm water metal contaminats on microbial communities in stream biofilm revealed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA)

    Ancion, Pierre; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stormwater metal contaminants are known to be a threat to our freshwater environments but little is known about their effects on stream micro-organisms. This project investigates accumulation and release of the most common stormwater metal contaminants (zinc, copper and lead) in stream biofilms and their effects on bacterial populations.

    View record details
  • Fostering the exchange of geoscience resources for knowledge exploration and discovery

    Whitehead, Brandon; Gahegan, Mark; Everett, M; Hills, S; Brodaric, B (2010-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Geoscience data capture is expensive. In order to extract maximum value, the data need to be consistently described, easily found, and then shared among those who need it. There has been recent momentum in the geoscience community to develop a common descriptive framework which facilitates data sharing. While storage and transfer standards are vital, they lack a descriptive element which standarizes the meaning of their contents. Metadata capture is appropriate for data stores, but often the terminology carries different meanings as domains become more specialised. For example, the term “migration” to a petroleum geochemist refers to the movement of hydrocarbons in geologic time, yet to a seismologist describes an imaging process. Furthermore, concepts associated with a term may change through time or as contextual factors in a discussion are modified. How, therefore, can the concepts evoked from geoscience resource terminology be defined and aligned to represent this multi-scaled orthogonal variability? Here we show how a community knowledge acquisition exercise was orchestrated to discuss fundamental concepts and their meanings as interpreted by leaders in basin characterization. The result of this exercise is a formal description of many of the features and processes associated with sedimentary basins, i.e. a basin ontology. This ontology allows the use of semantic connections between concepts as a backbone for search and discovery of research artifacts in large data stores.

    View record details
  • At your service: An interactive, flexible web-service for translating classification systems and taxonomies

    Whitehead, Brandon; Banchuen, Tawan; Gahegan, Mark; Smart, William; Masoud-Ansari, S (2010-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Geoscientists have developed and applied classification systems and taxonomies in an effort to enhance and share their understanding of complex geoscience information. However, the classification systems and taxonomies used throughout the geosciences for land cover and land use, soils, geology are neither static nor universal; the classes that we use to represent the Earth vary considerably with time and from place to place. As a general example, think of a geologic map. There are instances when mapped data contains desirable categories, but the granularity of those categories is not suitable. There are also instances where two or more maps (or data sets) lack the desired categories, or the categories across maps are semantically incompatible. This is to be expected, given that: (i) new science, social and economic agendas change what we may wish to differentiate when we look at a map and (ii) new technologies make differentiation of previously inseperable classes more reliable, thus viable. This paper describes ongoing work to create a web-based semantic translation service that allows users to: (i) experiment with mappings between classification systems and taxonomies; (ii) visualize translation maps using a given mapping; and (iii) persist their translation maps, and share them with others. Semantic equivalence and similarity are supported via underlying ontologies, which also facilitate the merging and re-grouping of classes.

    View record details
  • Can tree weta detect terrestrial bats

    Lomas, Kathryn; Field, LH; Wild, John; Kubke, Maria; Parsons, Stuart (2008-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Interactions between insects and bats are well-known examples of predator-prey co-evolution. For example, moths have evolved hearing abilities that allow them to respond to sounds in the ultrasound range, thus enabling them to detect the echolocation calls of hunting bats and perform evasive manoeuvres (Roeder 1998). Although New Zealand insects are preyed upon by endemic bats, no studies have examined whether they possess similar strategies for predator avoidance. If auditory information is used to detect and avoid predation, then the frequencies of greatest sensitivity of the auditory organ are predicted to correspond to the echolocation frequency (or other hunting-related sounds) produced by predatory bats. New Zealand has two endemic bats, the long tailed bat (Chalinolobus tuberculatus) and lesser short tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata). Long tailed bats are typical aerial insectivores and are not known to prey on weta.

    View record details
  • Using neuroanatomical imaging to learn about New Zealand's endemic species

    Corfield, Jeremy; Wild, John; Parsons, Stuart; Kubke, Maria (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Isolated from the world, New Zealand became a place where birds, in the absence of terrestrial mammals, evolved a diverse assortment of shapes, sizes and behaviours.

    View record details
  • The CellML Model Repository as a Resource for Cardiac Modelling

    Lawson, J.R.; Nobile, P.J.; Lloyd, C.M.; Neilsen, P.F.; Hunter, P.J. (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poster presented at Waiheke 2008 Multiscale Modelling of the Heart Workshop. The CellML repository now contains a number of well curated CellML models of cardiac biology and physiology at the cellular and subcellular level. Recently this resource has been growing rapidly in both quality and quantity and includes models of cardiac electrophysiology, excitation-contraction coupling, myofilament mechanics, signalling systems and combinations thereof. Herein we describe the CellML model repository, its range of models, the tools used to develop and test these models and the processes and aims of curating them. The relevance of this resource to multi-scale modelling of the heart in the present and the future is then discussed.

    View record details
  • Identifying and Visualizing Surface Detail on Michelangelo's David

    Rugis, John (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present the results of new experiments in which we have identified, characterized, and produced visualizations of selected fine surface detail on Michelangelo’s David statue. Starting with available raw scan data [Levoy et al. 2000], we have applied a number of techniques, both developed and refined by us, including the calculation of curvature maps, 2.5D spatial noise filtering, texture projection merging [Rugis 2006], and image processing assisted physical measurement. ....

    View record details
  • Engaging citizenship; formations of professionalism in social development practice - Doctoral Study

    Harington, Philip (2009-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    As an occupational identity emerges, how are critical elements of professionalism resolved in practice?

    View record details
  • Coupled mechanics and airflow of a human lung

    Hedges, KL; Hunter, PJ; Tawhai, MH (2006)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    To study the ventilation distribution within a human lung a model has been produced that couples soft tissue mechanics and a simplified airflow solution.

    View record details
  • Is negative exercise reinforcement a feature of exercise dependence? : factor analysis and further validation of the Exercise Reinforcement Questionnaire

    Lambert, Michelle (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Benefits of speech & language therapy for hearing impaired children

    Fairgray, Liz; Purdy, Suzanne (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference details: Reflecting Connections 2008, the second conference jointly hosted by the New Zealand Speech-Language Therapists Association and Speech Pathology Australia. Held at the SKYCITY Convention Centre in Auckland, New Zealand, from the 25th to the 29th of May, 2008. http://www.reflectingconnections.co.nz/ Although the need for speech and language therapy is widely recognized for children who are hearing impaired, there is little research evidence for improved outcomes after specific speech and language therapy interventions. With improvements in hearing aid and cochlear implant technology, and consequently improved access to the speech signal, there has been greater emphasis on listening-based therapies. The most widely used therapy is referred to as “auditory-verbal therapy” (AVT). This approach is endorsed by the Alexander Graham Bell Association, but there is paucity of research evidence for AVT effectiveness (Rhoades, 1982; Goldberg & Flexer, 1993; Wray et al., 1997; Rhoades & Chisholm, 2000). Previous studies have focused on psychosocial and educational outcomes of AVT, rather than measuring specific speech and language outcomes. The current study investigates speech and language, speech perception in noise and reading abilities before and after a 6-month period of weekly AVT with an experienced Certified Auditory-Verbal and Speech-language Therapist. Participants are eight children aged 5 to 17 years with moderate-profound sensorineural hearing loss using cochlear implants (CI) and/or hearing aids.

    View record details
  • Practice-led curricula: driving from the front or rear seat?

    Adamson, Carole (2009-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Do knowledge-driven or practice-led models best serve the needs of social work practitioners engagin

    View record details
  • Clinical ICT Tools: Are we able to measure their effectiveness? A Case Study

    Ewens, Andrew; Orr, M; Starr Jr, RG (2014-09-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details