276 results for Conference poster

  • Mitochondrial Respiration in Skeletal Muscle of Obese Women Prior To Bariatric Surgery and Following Six Months of Weight Loss

    MacDonald, J; McGill, Anne-Thea; Hickey, A; Plank, L; McLeod, B; Falk, S; Wiessing, K; Beban, G; Chan, YK; Xin, Liping; Cooper, GJS; Poppitt, SD (2010-07-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Clever Crosswalking - what do you take from one system to another?

    Zhao, Yanan; Shepherd, Kim; Hayes, Sharron; Schweer, A (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The poster looked at a metadata crosswalk implemented between a DSpace repository and a Research Management System (RMS) at the University of Auckland (UoA). The crosswalk facilitated the exposure of publication metadata from the internal RMS to the DSpace repository with the least amount of work and highest amount of accuracy.

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  • Nonlinear dynamics of an electronic model of one-way coupling in one and two dimensions

    Doud, AB; Breen, Barbara; Grimm, JR; Tanasse, AH; Tanasse, SJ; Lindner, JF; Maxted, K (2011-03-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    One-way or unidirectional coupling is a striking example of how topological considerations -- the parity of an array of multistable elements combined with periodic boundary conditions -- can qualitatively influence dynamics. Here we introduce a simple electronic model of one-way coupling in one and two dimensions and experimentally compare it to an improved mechanical model and an ideal mathematical model. In two dimensions, computation and experiment reveal richer one-way coupling phenomenology: in media where two-way coupling would dissipate all excitations, one-way coupling enables soliton-like waves to propagate in different directions with different speeds.

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  • Probing Student Approaches and Engagement in Learning Chemistry at University.

    Salter, David; Simpson, MC; Hamilton, R (2011-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This project aims to identify students’ learning approaches, engagement, attitudes and success in chemistry classes that are service-taught as part of a specified health sciences programme and in chemistry classes that are taught as part of a chemistry major programme. It seeks to determine whether any differences exist in the learning approaches, motivational orientation and engagement, and compare the success of a cohort of students who are required to enrol in a compulsory chemistry course as part of a health sciences degree with that of a cohort of students who choose to enrol in a chemistry course with the possible intention of majoring in chemistry. It is intended that both cognitive and motivational individual difference variables are identified and relationships between students’ goal orientation and university academic success evaluated.

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  • The student nurse integrated team model:barriers and benefits

    Aspinall, Cathleen; Baker, H; Vallant, S; Spence, D (2010-11-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The student nurse integrated team model:barriers and benefits Intent. The purpose of this research was to evaluate a collaborative project to implement an integrated team model of learning in practice with the clinical placement provider for second year Bachelor of Nursing students from the University of Auckland and Auckland University of Technology. Description. Our clinical partner put forward a proposal to change the model of working with undergraduate student nurses in the clinical environment .The aim was to improve the student’s integration into nursing teams and also strengthen their model of team nursing. The World Health Organisation (WHO 2009) identified that the role individuals play within a team influences team effectiveness and therefore impacts on the quality of patient safety. From a University perspective this involved changing the role of the academic lecturer from working alongside the student to supporting the registered nurses. In their role as mentors, the nurses would assist with the integration of theory into practice and teach clinical skills at the bedside. A perceived benefit would be the emersion of second year student nurses into the ward team. The student nurse integrated team model was devised based on a mentorship concept and piloted in the medical and surgical areas of the public hospital. This study evaluated the model from both the University and the ADHB perspective using a mixed methodology.The University of Auckland surveyed students, university lecturers, charge nurses, staff nurse mentors and clinical nurse educators.The Auckland University of Technology held focus groups with the same participants. It was anticipated that this method would provide hard data for evaluation and qualitative information to explore the experience. The introduction of a new way of working in reality meant a change of role for university and clinical staff. Furthermore, the success of the project as with any change initiative, was dependent on a number of stakeholders. Evaluation Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the evaluation of this new way of working, the process and results will be shared at the conference. Bibliography includes but not limited to the following: Flin, R. Winter, J. Sarac, and C. & Raduma, M. (2009) .Human factors in patient safety: Review of tools and topics. Geneva: World Health Organization.

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  • High throughput methods for the investigation of the human microbiome

    Lau, Kelvin; Berg, A; Ketley, J; Barer, M (2011-03-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Microorganisms can colonise many sites within the human host, including the skin, gastrointestinal tracts, oronasopharyngeal cavity and urogenital tract. Comprehensive studies of the human microbiome often need to encompass a large number of samples as a consequence of the variety of distinct sites that are colonised, and the significant variation in microbiota that can exist between individuals. For large sample sets, the cost of sequencing and the bioinformatics resources required to process sequence data can be prohibitive, and become limiting factors for the depth of the investigation. ....

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  • What Does My Grade Mean?: Differing Assessment Models in Chemistry.

    Salter, David (2009-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Determining whether students have learnt what was intended is a crucial aspect of every course. How this is done and what the outcome shows can however vary greatly. Traditionally in New Zealand, tertiary students’ academic ability is assessed using methods that allow for discrimination between students through norm-referencing, typically producing a single cumulative percentage value which is translated into a letter grade. In contrast, the Government-mandated system for assessing secondary school students in New Zealand is based on a model of criterion-referenced assessment that aims to describe students’ current level of performance with reference to specific performance criteria which are derived from national curriculum statements. Consequently, in progressing from secondary to tertiary education in New Zealand, students experience a major change in the assessment of their performance from being independent of others to being relative to others. A comparison of these two assessment systems used in New Zealand will be presented as well as a description of how standards-based assessment is being introduced into several first-year tertiary chemistry courses as a way to better indicate students’ current capabilities and assist students in the transition between secondary and tertiary education.

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  • Characterisation of a transgenic ovine model of Huntington???s disease

    Reid, Susanne; Handley, R; Patassini, S; Rudiger, S; Keynes, P; McLaughlan, C; Waldvogel, H; Jacobsen, J; MacDonald, M; Gusella, J; Morton, J; Bawden, S; Faull, R; Snell, R (2011-09-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A transgenic ovine model of Huntington???s disease has been developed to enable the examination of the earliest disease changes in a large mammal. Ovis aries were selected because their basal ganglia and cortex is similar to analogous regions of the human brain. Importantly, they live for more than a decade, allowing for the study of the chronic effects of a fulllength HTT expressing transgene. Microinjection of a fulllength human HD cDNA containing 73 polyglutamine repeats under the control of the human promoter, resulted in six transgenic founders varying in copy-number of the transgene.

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  • Identification of a novel group of muscular dystrophies, the Anoctaminopathies, caused by recessive mutations in the putative calcium activated chloride channel, ANO5

    Marlow, Gareth; Bolduc, V; Boycott, KM; Saleki, K; Inoue, H; Kroon, J; Itakura, M; Robitaille, Y; Parent, L; Baas, F; Mizuta, K; Kamata, N; Richard, I; Linssen, W; Mahjneh, I; de Visser, M; Brais, B; Bashir, R (2010-03-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Anoctamin (ANO) family consists of 10 proteins several of which have been shown to correspond to the elusive calciumactivated chloride channels (CaCCs). CaCCs are gated by increases in intracellular calcium and they have been linked to several cellular functions including epithelial transport, cell volume regulation, olfactory and photoreceptor transduction, cardiac membrane excitability, and smooth muscle contraction. The only reported human mutations linked with the ANO family are dominant mutations in ANO5, which cause a rare bone fragility disorder gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia (GDD1). Recently we have identified recessive ANO5 mutations in patients with proximal limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2L) and a distal non-dysferlin Miyoshi myopathy (MMD3). The mutations identified consist of splice site, a single adenine duplication and missense. The duplicated adenine is present in LGMD2L and MMD3. The LGMD2L phenotype is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and prominent asymmetric quadriceps atrophy. The MMD3 phenotype is associated with distal weakness in particular of the calf muscles. The clinical heterogeneity associated with ANO5 mutations is reminiscent of that observed with dysferlin mutations which can cause both a LGMD and distal muscular dystrophy. ANO5 mutations are associated with loss of muscle membrane integrity and defective membrane repair. Our studies suggest that ANO5 is a putative calcium-activated chloride channel which may function with dysferlin in membrane repair. Our study has identified a novel group of muscular dystrophies ???the Anoctaminopathies???.

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  • Diversity in Large Classes: The Challenge Of Providing Self Directed Formative Learning

    Harper, Amanda; Brittain, Judith (2007-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    First year science courses at the University of Auckland face a number of common challenges which impact on course design and learning support for individual students. The large student cohorts (> 1100) entering courses are not only diverse in future program choices but also in their educational backgrounds. Opportunities for formative learning have been developed though the web environment using the university???s ???in house??? learning management system Cecil, and Bestchoice (an interactive learning portal). http://bestchoice.net.nz (Woodgate and Titheridge 2006). These formative learning activities have been integrated into existing course designs (Gunn & Harper 2006) to support diversity in learning strategies and learning styles while enabling all students to develop a sound body of knowledge essential in the discipline of Science. Teachers across the disciplines of Chemistry and Biological Sciences maintain a professional dialogue about learning developments. There is an overlap of the order of 80% across the Biology and Chemistry cohorts. Where it is appropriate, similar technologies are used. This commonality between courses results in improvements in students??? learning outcomes. This is part of teaching reflective practice which is currently influencing future developments.

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  • Characterisation of the Genetic Controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, KR; Plummer, K; Beveridge, CA; Snowden, Kimberley (2005-10-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Branching is a fundamental process affecting plant form and is a source of much of the wide variety of plant architecture seen in nature. Our aim is to understand the function of genes involved in branching using petunia as a model system. This research involves the study of the decreased apical dominance (dad) mutants in petunia, which have increased basal branching compared with wild type. It also involves the investigation of genes known to affect branching in other plant species to discover their effects in petunia. One of these genes, MAX2, was identified from an increased branching mutant in Arabidopsis, and its effects in petunia are being investigated by misexpression of the petunia orthologue. Previous grafting experiments using the dad mutants in petunia have shown that a graft-transmissible signal is involved in causing the increased branching phenotype. Hormones are graft-transmissible chemicals and variation in their levels play important roles in the control of apical dominance, one of the most studied controls in lateral branching. Auxin and cytokinin levels in dad mutant and wild type plants were investigated, but the levels of these hormones were not consistent with them being the graft-transmissible signal modified by the DAD genes. In order to investigate the relationships between the DAD genes, the branching phenotypes of the single and double dad mutants were characterised and analysed. Grafting experiments to investigate the interactions between the DAD genes in controlling the branching signal were also undertaken. This work has revealed interactions between the DAD genes and provided evidence for the order of action of these genes.

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  • Comparison and refinement of hip joint centre prediction methods on a large contemporary population

    Zhang, Ju; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Besier, T (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The location of the hip joint centre (HJC) is critical for accurate lower limb kinematics. A number of methods allow the HJC to be predicted from the locations of bony pelvic landmarks. However, widely used predictions methods are often developed on small populations, or have inappropriate parameters when considering different populations. We compare the accuracy of prediction methods by Tylkowski[1], Bell[2], and Seidel[3], and update their parameters using a large urban population. 3-D models of the pelvis were automatically segmented from 159 (86 male, 73 female) post-mortem CT scans collected at the Victorian Insitute of Forensic Medicine. The dataset reflects a contemporary western urban adult population from the state of Victoria, Australia. Bony landmarks (ASIS, PSIS, symphysis pubis) were defined on an atlas model and propagated to correspondent positions on each subject-specific model. The three published methods above were used to predict HJC locations first using their published parameters, then using parameters fitted to the current dataset. Ground truth HJC locations were calculated as the centre of a sphere fitted to the acetabular regions of each model. Using published parameters, mean errors in millimetres for the Tylkowski, Bell, and Seidel methods were, respectively, 23 (4.9), 26 (4.1), and 18 (3.9). After fitting parameters to the current dataset, corresponding mean errors were 13 (5.5), 7.3(4.0), and 5.7 (3.3). Published parameter errors were similar to published errors for the Tylkowski and Bell methods, and more than twice that published for the Seidel method. After fitting parameters, errors for all methods were significantly lower than those previously published. These results highlight the need to validate and recalibrate joint centre prediction methods on large and population-specific datasets.

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  • Characterisation of the Genetic and Hormone controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, K; Plummer, K; Beveridge, C; Snowden, Kimberley (2004-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Prolonged Exposure to S-Adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) Perturbs Adipocyte Biology

    Ngo, Sherry; Roberts, R; Castro, L; Bhoothpoor, C; Gluckman, P; Sheppard, A (2011-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Role of Antioxidants and Polyphenols in the Stability of Sauvignon Blanc Aromas

    Herbst, M; Kilmartin, PA; Nicolau, L (2006-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Impact of grape harvesting on varietal thiols in Sauvignon blanc wines

    Allen, T; Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Girault, M; Butler, P; Logan, G; Jouanneau, S; Nicolau, L; Kilmartin, PA (2012-02-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc

    Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Kilmartin, PA; Nicolau, L (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Gelation of oxidised cereal beta-glucan extracts

    Mohan, Anand (2014-02-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cereal ??-glucan, which occurs in plant cell walls, is the major component of soluble dietary fiber in oat and barley. Soluble fibers with a high solution viscosity, which is positively correlated to molecular weight (MW), lower the serum glucose and cholesterol levels. The relevant health claims on ??-glucan as a functional food have been allowed by regulatory authorities, including the EFSA and the US FDA. In most processed-food systems, the native hydrolytic enzymes are inactivated, but oxidative degradation of this non-starch polysaccharide can, however, adversely affect the claimed health benefits. (Kivel?? 2011). Although the physiological benefits are positively correlated with the viscosity of ??-glucan, the relationship with its gelling capacity is not fully understood. The scope of the Master???s thesis included (1) the study of gelation characteristics of oxidised solutions of oat and barley ??-glucan, and (2) correlating the results obtained by dynamic light scattering (DLS) microrheology with conventional rheology.

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  • ResearchSpace@Auckland : Disaster Recovery (DR)

    Latt, Yin Yin; Hayes, Sharron (2008-04-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The University of Auckland Library and Information Technology Services have partnered to provide a DSpace installation utilising a mature IT infrastructure. The application is hosted on the University of Auckland???s virtual server cluster in the recently completed ???City Data Centre??? along with other enterprise systems. ResearchSpace is operational 24x7 and has a Disaster Recovery mirror located at a second location. Handle identifiers are maintained between the two systems to ensure users can submit items at all times.

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  • Crystallographic studies on Ru and Ir-based SrB1-xMxO3-type perovskites

    Qasim, Ilyas; Kennedy, BJ; Avdeev, M (2012-11-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Strontium ruthenate and iridate perovskites are of great interest due to their potential technological importance related to their exotic physical properties. Despite the chemical simplicity of the perovskite structure there are a number of examples where the precise structure is unknown or where different researchers have proposed different structures for the sample material. Understanding the relationship between the structure and physical properties is a significant barrier to the development of these types of materials. Two series of oxides of the type SrRu1-xBx03 and Srlr1-xBxO3- (?? = transition metals) have been synthesized using solid state methods, and selected members of these have been structurally characterized using combination of synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction methods and their physical properties investigated. Neutron data were critical to establish precise and accurate structures of a number of these materials including Sr2FeIr06 SrRu0.8Ni0.2O3 and Srlr0.8Ni0.203.

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