277 results for Conference poster

  • Antifungal properties of sugar lactones

    Oliveira, Maria; Neves, A; Justino, J; Noronha, JP; Marcelo, F; Riccombeni, A; Rauter, AP (2005)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Impact of conjugate pneumococcal vaccine on nasopharyngeal S.pneumoniae serotypes and antibiotic susceptibility over 7 years

    Best, Emma; Taylor, S; Tse, F; McBride, C; Stewart, Joanna; Lennon, Diana; Trenholme, A (2015-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Over-expression of Human Amylin Leads to Oligomerization and beta-cell Dysfunction Associated with Mitochondrial Uncoupling, Activation of c-Jun and Decrease Expression of JNK Interacting Protein-1

    Zhang, Shaoping; Liu, H; Chuang, CL; Li, XL; Au, M; Zhang, L; Cooper, GJS (2012-06-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over-expression of human amylin (hA) in pancreatic β-cells has been shown to contribute to cytotoxic hA aggregation and islet amyloid formation that can lead to β-cell dysfunction in type-2 diabetes mellitus. We aimed to investigate the functional and molecular changes associated with hA oligomer formation and their relation to β-cell dysfunction and diabetes development using transgenic mouse model that over-expresses hA in their islet β-cells.We showed that both homozygous and hemizygous hA transgenic mice developed spontaneous diabetes with different elevated levels of hA and with different time frame of disease onset and death. Homozygous mice displayed hyperinsulinemia and self-limiting insulin resistance during the pre-diabetic state, whereas by contrast, hemizygous mice had a longer prediabetic phase without insulin resistance. Intracellular and extracellular oligomers were clearly detectable before onset of diabetes with strong correlation with the time of β-cell apoptosis occurred in homozygous but not in hemizygous mice, indicating a difference in the extent of cytotoxic oligomerization between these animals. In addition, RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated progressive decrease in β-cell expression of functional and key regulatory molecules such as insulin, amylin, Pdx1, MafA, Glut2 and GCK. We also detected changes in expression of the mitochondrial membrane protein UCP-2 which contributes to decreased mitochondrial function. Further molecular analysis demonstrated activation of c-Jun/JNK and decrease expression of JNK-interacting protein 1, suggesting their role in mediating beta-cell death/apoptosis. Our studies should lead to a better understanding of the role and regulation of hA-evoked β-cell dysfunction and β-cell death in diabetes

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  • Nano-structural organisation in ionic liquids

    Kathirgamanathan, Kalyani; Al-Hakkak, J; Edmonds, Neil; Easteal, Allan; Grigsby, WJ (2009-12-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Monitoring the health of New Zealand’s young people: A decade of surveillance research

    Clark, TC; Fleming, T; Bullen, P; Crengle, S; Denny, S; Dyson, B; Peiris John, R; Robinson, E; Rossen, F; Sheridan, J; Teevale, T; Utter, J; Fortune, S; Lewycka, S (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Purine Nucleosides as Cholinesterase Inhibitors

    Marcelo, F; Rauter, AP; Blériot, Y; Sinaÿ, P; Oliveira, Maria; Goulart, M; Justino, J (2008-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • High Pressure and Thermal Processing of kiwifruit puree: the effect on antioxidants and vitamin C

    Soloman, N; Oliveira, Maria (2011-11-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Giving research global reach: ResearchSpace@Auckland

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Hayes, Leonie (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A key part of the academic research process is publishing the results – ‘getting it out there’. An institutional repository such as ResearchSpace@Auckland provides authors with a channel for near-instantaneous worldwide dissemination of research. ResearchSpace@Auckland at the University of Auckland was initially developed under the umbrella of the Institutional Repositories Aotearoa (Ira) Project. The project between Auckland, Canterbury and Victoria Universities used DSpace Open Source Software and was funded by the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC). The project was completed in 2007. ResearchSpace is now a full production system with seamless Disaster Recovery ability, which allows authors to submit their work confident that it will be secure. ResearchSpace contains ‘research outputs’ from the University of Auckland’s staff and students, including theses, papers and reports. From 2007 it is a requirement for all enrolling PhD students to submit a digital copy of their thesis upon completion. The PhD collection has grown from an initial 200 items at the beginning of 2007 to nearly 1700 items. 775 of these are open-access. This has been achieved via a retrospective digitization project for all PhD theses and a campaign to contact the authors for permission. Key features of ResearchSpace • Authors submit their own content initially (self-submission), administrators check content and publish it online • Most content is freely available to any user – use is not restricted to members of the institution or subscribers • Durable & Permanent URLs: we use ‘Handles’. e.g. http://hdl.handle.net/2292/1430. A handle does not have the institution’s domain name in the URL, if the website is changed or moved, the URL will still go to the correct location. • Preservation: creating digital files allows creation of a new print copy if necessary. Thesis files are in Portable Document Format (PDF), and the library has undertaken to keep the formats up to date, as technology may change in the future.

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  • Metabolic Outcomes in children born to mothers with severe hyperemesis gravidarum

    Ayyavoo, A; Hofman, Paul; Derraik, J; Mathai, M; Stone, P; Bloomfield, F; Cutfield, C (2012-06-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Etiology of increasing incidence of congenital hypothyroidism in New Zealand from 1993 to 2010

    Albert, B; Jefferies, C; Webster, D; Cutfield, W; Gunn, A; Carll, J; Bendikson, K; Derraik, J; Hofman, Paul (2012-06-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New sugar agents for the control of undesirable microbes in the food industry

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Neves, A; Rauter, AP (2007-11-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Purine nucleosides as new agents for the control of Alzheimer’s disease

    Oliveira, Maria; Marcelo, F; Justino, J; Jacob, AP; Bleriot, Y; Sinay, P; Goulart, M; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Metabolomics as a novel approach to study mixed species biofilms of stream bacteria exhibiting mutualistic and antagonistic responses

    Washington, Vidya; Villas-Boas, Silas; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Experimental objective / Purpose 1. To investigate the metabolic interactions of bacterial species using metabolic footprint profiling. 2. As proof of concept, microbes exhibiting mutualistic and antagonistic associations were chosen for this study.

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  • Getting Research 'Out There': ResearchSpace@Auckland

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa; Laurie, John; Hayes, Leonie (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A key part of the academic research process is publishing the results – ‘getting it out there’. An institutional repository such as ResearchSpace@Auckland provides authors with a channel for near-instantaneous worldwide dissemination of research. ResearchSpace@Auckland has been developed at the University of Auckland under the umbrella of the Institutional Repositories Aotearoa Project (Ira). Built using DSpace Open Source Software, the repository contains ‘research outputs’ from the University of Auckland’s staff and students, including theses, papers and reports. The PhD thesis collection is the flagship of the repository – electronic submission is compulsory for all completing PhD students from 2011. The initial 200 items in the PhD thesis collection were gathered by contacting authors of theses submitted at the University of Auckland since 2001 and inviting them to submit digital copies and consent forms. Trials are underway to digitize theses that are unavailable in digital format. The mandating of compulsory submission for PhD theses submitted at the University of Auckland ensures regulatory requirements for digital deposit are catered for. Other collections for articles, papers, and images are being developed.

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  • Registry of BioBricks models using CellML

    Rouilly, Vincent; Canton, Barry; Nielsen, Poul; Kitney, Richard (2007)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. One of the main goals in Synthetic Biology is to assess the feasibility of building novel biological systems from interchangeable and standardized parts. In order to collect and share parts, a Registry of standardized DNA BioBricks http://parts.mit.edu/registry has been established at the MIT. BioBricks can be assembled to form devices and systems to operate in living cells. Design of reliable devices and systems would benefit from accurate models of system function. To predict the function of systems built from many parts, we need to have accurate models for the parts and mechanisms to easily compose those part models into a system model. Therefore, in parallel to increasing the number of parts available and characterising them experimentally, a logical extension to the Registry would be to build a Registry of BioBrick models to complement the physical parts.

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  • Space-Time Multi-Resolution Banded Graph-Cut for Fast Segmentation. (Conference Poster)

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Gruber, Daniel; Wedel, Andreas; Klappstein, Jens (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 30th Annual Symposium of the German Association for Pattern Recognition DAGM Munich, Germany, June 2008. http://www.dagm2008.org/ Applying real-time segmentation is a major issue when processing every frame of image sequences. In this paper, we propose a modi cation of the well known graph-cut algorithm to improve speed for discrete segmentation. Our algorithm yields real-time segmentation, using graph-cut, by performing a single cut on an image with regions of di erent resolutions, combining space-time pyramids and narrow bands. This is especially suitable for image sequences, as segment borders in one image are re ned in the next image. The fast computation time allows one to use information contained in every image frame of an input image stream at 20 Hz, on a standard PC. The algorithm is applied to traf- c scenes, using a monocular camera installed in a moving vehicle. Our results show the segmentation of moving objects with similar results to standard graph-cut, but with improved speed.

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  • Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Wedel, Andreas; Rabe, Clemens; Klappstein, Jens; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand. IVCNZ 08. Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ The detection of moving objects is a crucial part of driver assistance systems. This paper tackles this issue using computer vision. Two approaches are investigated, monocular and stereoscopic. The base principals and implementational issues are discussed and detailed, high- lighting areas of concern. In both cases, the detection is based on motion analysis of individually tracked image points (optical ow). The monoc- ular approach relies solely on the optical ow, where as the stereoscopic approach also takes stereo depth information into account. In both ap- proaches the motion analysis provides a motion metric which corresponds to the likelihood that the tracked point is moving. Based on this metric the points are segmented into objects by employing the globally op- timal graph cut algorithm. These approaches are then compared and contrasted using real-world vehicle image sequences.

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  • An Approach for Evaluating Robustness of Edge Operators using Real-World Driving Scenes

    Al-Sarraf, Ali; Vaudrey, Tobi; Klette, Reinhard; Woo, Young Woon (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ Over the past 20 years there have been many papers that compare and evaluate di erent edge operators. Most of them focus on accuracy and also do comparisons against synthetic data. This paper focuses on real-world driver assistance scenes and does a comparison based on robustness. The three edge operators compared are Sobel, Canny and the under-publicized phase-based Kovesi-Owens operator. The Kovesi- Owens operator has the distinct advantage that it uses one pre-selected set of parameters and can work across almost any type of scene, where as other operators require parameter tuning. The results from our comparison show that the Kovesi-Owens operator is the most robust of the three, and can get decent results, even under weak illumination and varying gradients in the images. Keywords: edge operators, edge robustness evaluation, Kovesi-Owens, phase operators

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  • Apple Waste Preservation for Extraction of Antioxidants

    Zhan, D; Oliveira, Maria; Saleh, Z (2015-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A huge amount of apple waste is generated from juice, cider and other apple product industries. This waste represents a cost and causes environmental problems. Apple waste is a rich source of polyphenolic compounds, mostly found in the apple peels and cores. Polyphenols are antioxidants with high value that can be extracted from the waste and exploited commercially. Proper methods of waste pasteurisation would allow its preservation and reduce waste degradation. In this study, diluted apple waste was pasteurised using three different technologies: thermal processing (TP), high pressure processing (HPP) and low pressure assisted thermal processing. The effect of processing on the waste native yeasts and moulds, inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and antioxidants were investigated. TP at 60, 80 and 100 °C for 30 min, HPP at 300, 400 and 500 MPa for 10 min and 600 MPa for 20 min, and low pressure assisted thermal processing at 60, 80 and 100 °C with 2 MPa for 30 min were carried out. The total yeasts and moulds initially in the diluted apple waste was about 6.6×101 cfu/g, which was fully inactivated by the three technologies. S. cerevisiae inoculated in the waste was reduced by 5-log or more with all processing methods/conditions. HPP and low pressure assisted thermal processing treatments did not affect the antioxidant activity (DPPH-radical scavenging). However, both TPC and DPPH radical scavenging decreased with TP (p < 0.05). The results of this study can be helpful for designing appropriate conditions to pasteurise fruit industry byproducts for further extraction of high value antioxidants.

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  • Considering clinical protocols and guidelines: what lessons for IPE?

    Barrow, Mark; Gasquoine, S (2016-08-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Interprofessional collaboration is enhanced if professionals work across discursive boundaries. While interprofessional education interventions may encourage this the practice environment may militate against the implementation of understandings developed in educational settings. Summary of work: Interviews with doctors and nurses highlighted differences between each professions’ views of clinical protocols and guidelines. This prompted us to conduct a critical discourse analysis of a number of clinical guidelines and the systems which guide their development and approval. Summary of results: Our analysis shows a range of discourses at work within clinical protocols régimes. Development and approval systems are dominated by collectivist discourses emphasising communication and collaboration within rigid bureaucratic systems. The protocols exemplify a neo-liberal discourse where people who are the objects of care are positioned as clients or consumers amenable to standardised aliquots of diagnosis and care, the level of which can be justified on the basis of scoring systems and claims related to a ‘scientific’ evidence base. The régimes also suggests (perhaps falsely) flattened hierarchical structures, a democratising discourse where all professional voices are equal in the provision of care. Discussion: A nursing identity relies on experience, holistic views of patients and collective approaches to practice. The medical identity is based on craft-based development of expertise associated with generating distinctive and sometime idiosyncratic responses to a patient’s needs. Each comes to protocols with different ‘agenda’. Conclusions: The collectivist discourse of protocol development does not seem to carry through to their utilisation. Protocols appear to act as objects that reinforce discursive boundaries between the groups. Take-home messages: Educators need to consider the effect of protocols on practice and account for this in the design of educational interventions. Understanding the discursive roll of protocols might help educators design more robust IPE programmes.

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