277 results for Conference poster

  • Insulin and IGF1 modulate PSA-NCAM turnover in a process involving specific extracellular matrix components

    Monzo, HJ; Park, TIH; Dieriks, Birger; Jansson, D; Dragunow, Michael; Curtis, Maurice (2014-07-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • LiDAR and EM conductivity investigation of a Holocene coastal landslide complex: Pourewa Landslide Zone, Auckland, New Zealand

    Liu, S; Brook, Martin; Richards, NP; Bevan, D; Prebble, W (2016-12-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Rapid mapping of a Holocene coastal landslide using Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry: Ohuka Landslide, Port Waikato, New Zealand

    Bevan, D; Brook, MS; Tunnicliffe, Jon; Prebble, W (2016-12-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Quaternary geology of the Auckland urban region, New Zealand: geotechnical properties and engineering implications

    Brook, Martin; Roberts, R; France, S; Williams, AL; Prebble, W (2016-12-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New antifungal and antibacterial compounds: 1,3-oxazoline- and 1,3-oxazolidine-2-thiones

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Silva, S; Tatibouet, A; Rollin, P; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Use of whole-community bacterial indicators to monitor ecological health, function and variability within freshwater stream biofilms.

    Lear, Gavin; Smith, Joanna; Roberts, Kelly; Boothroyd, Ian; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study describes the extent of variability in biofilm bacterial community structure across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and assesses whether this may be used as an indicator of stream ecological health and function. A community DNA fingerprinting technique (Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis - ARISA) was used to examine the structure of bacterial communities within freshwater stream biofilms. When compared with macrobenthic invertebrate community assemblages using multi-dimensional scaling techniques, similar broad-scale trends in population structure were revealed between organisms at these different trophic levels. For both communities, spatial variability in community structure was greater between streams than within each site, or compared to temporal variability measured over 1 year. Distance-based redundancy analysis of both bacterial ARISA and macroinvertebrate data estimated that the largest cause of variation in community structure was due to differences in catchment land-use, rather than any single water quality parameter (e.g. ph or ammoniacal nitrogen). Multidimensional scaling of ARISA data also revealed significant differences in community structure between urban, and less impacted stream sites, providing evidence that whole-bacterial communities could be used as an indicator of freshwater ecological health, analogous to the way that macroinvertebrate communities have been used for many years. In conclusion, we propose the analysis of whole bacterial communities as a cost-effective, high throughput alternative indicator of freshwater ecological health.

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  • Unusual Bacterially mediated manganese-based structures within biofilms from urban streams.

    Smith, Joanna; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The objectives of this study were to describe the occurrence and nature of unusual brown “doughnut”-shaped microbial structures present within the biofilms of several urban streams in Auckland, New Zealand, and the bacteria responsible for their formation. These structures, termed anelli, were observed with light and scanning electron microscopy to be shallow conical microcolonies consisting of a ring, enriched in manganese and iron, surrounding a central pore. Bacteria were observed to reside within the pores, although anelli seen within biofilms were frequently vacant structures. A manganese depositing, anellus-forming bacterium (JOSHI_001) was isolated on solid media, and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed this bacterium to belong to the order Burkholderiales within the class β-proteobacteria, closely related to the manganese-depositing genus Leptothrix. The presence of anelli within biofilms was found to require Mn(II), however, elevated levels of this element within stream water did not necessarily result in growth of anelli. Anelli were only dominant structures within biofilms from those stream sites subjected to a high level of anthropogenic impact, suggesting that Mn(II) may not be the only factor influencing competitive capability. Investigation of additional streams within the Auckland region, influenced by a range of different types of anthropogenic impact is ongoing. Molecular analysis indicated that although anelli were structurally dominant, the β-proteobacteria comprised only a minor component of the bacterial community present within the biofilms. JOSHI_001 may have a significant impact on geochemical cycling and stream ecology within streams subjected to high levels of anthropogenic impact.

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  • Do you see what I see? - Surveillance and response

    Patel, Reena; Dixon, Robyn; Webster, Craig (2015-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: Early warning scoring systems and rapid response teams are important strategies to improve the detection of patient deterioration in hospitals. Initiation of an appropriate response relies on nurses recognising changes in patient condition and alerting the required emergency assistance team. Study Objective: To determine the level of concordance between the nurse’s assessment and that of the emergency team, based on early warning scores (EWS). Methods: An audit of data collected between June 2011 and May 2013 was undertaken and 2780 instances were reviewed in order to determine the degree of concordance on EWS scores between nurses initiating calls and those assigned by the emergency response team. Results: 881 instances lack of concordance was identified. In the majority of instances, the nurse overestimated the severity of the patient’s condition when compared to the emergency response team’s score. Conclusion: Such lack of concordance is problematic given that failure to activate an emergency response when required has obvious implications for patient safety while inappropriate referral to emergency response teams can result in inefficient use of resources.

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  • Household Characteristics of Children Under Two Years Admitted with Lower Respiratory Infection in South Auckland

    Vogel, A; Trenholme, A; Lennon, Diana; McBride, C; Stewart, Joanna; Best, Emma; Mason, H; Siatu'u, Teuila (2011-04-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Collaborative Problem Solving for Do-ers and Teachers of Mathematics

    Sheryn, Sarah; Frankcom, G; Ledger, G (2014-11-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study sought to explore and analyse the phenomenon of maths anxiety within a real-life context, and to identify if levels of maths anxiety can be reduced through participation in a reciprocal teaching process. This poster presents a small element of the larger study, which investigated how to reduce maths anxiety in teacher candidates. Maths anxiety is a well-researched phenomenon that is known to impede the successful mathematics teaching and learning experiences of some teacher candidates. The maths anxiety these students bring to their mathematics education courses results in poor quality mathematics teaching (Biddulph 1999; Frankcom 2006; Sloan 2010). Mathematics education lecturers have become increasingly aware of how some students become visibly anxious when they walk into the mathematics classroom, and/or are asked to collaborate to solve mathematical problems. These observations are supported by the level of maths anxiety reported by these students. The model developed for this study was informed by the work of Palinscar and Brown (1984) and complemented by problem-solving models from Mullis, et al. (2008), Reilly, Parsons and Bortolot (2009), and Polya (1945). The Revised Reciprocal Teaching Model (RRTM) was designed is to facilitate teacher candidates’ access to mathematical practices used in schools, and simultaneously develop their personal mathematical knowledge and understanding. Cognisant of the problem solving and peer mentoring literature, researchers provided opportunities for graduates to develop adaptive expertise. While peer mentoring is thoroughly established in literacy education it is under-researched within mathematics education. Reciprocal teaching falls within this area of research and provides a framework for individuals to mutually support each other while learning. The RRTM was developed to promote discourse within mathematical communities in an attempt to reduce maths anxiety. The implementation of the RRTM was through a two-phased structured framework, designed to take place over a university calendar year. The framework began with specific training of peer mentors who in turn worked with assigned mentees. The second phase promoted less reliance on the peer mentors and resulted in the students forming their own peer mentoring groups outside of class time. Results suggest that the model has a positive effect on students’ ability to confidently talk about and solve mathematical problems. This is evidenced by the decrease in maths anxiety levels self-reported by teacher candidates. This research indicates the RRTM has the potential to reduce maths anxiety levels of teacher candidates and produce confident do-ers and teachers of mathematics.

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  • A case of overwhelming sepsis in splenectomised child

    Alkhudairi, Z; Wilson, E; Best, Emma (2015-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Measuring the electrical impedance of mouse brain cortex

    Wilson, MT; Elbohouty, M; Lin, Oliver; Voss, LJ; Jones, K; Steyn-Ross, DA (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We report on an experimental method to measure conductivity of cortical tissue. We use a pair of 5mm diameter Ag/AgCl electrodes in a Perspex sandwich device that can be brought to a distance of 400 microns apart. The apparatus is brought to uniform temperature before use. Electrical impedance of a sample is measured across the frequency range 20 Hz-2.0 MHz with an Agilent 4980A four-point impedance monitor in a shielded room. The equipment has been used to measure the conductivity of mature mouse brain cortex in vitro. Slices 400 microns in thickness are prepared on a vibratome. Slices are bathed in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) to keep them alive. Slices are removed from the ACSF and sections of cortical tissue approximately 2 mm times 2 mm are cut with a razor blade. The sections are photographed through a calibrated microscope to allow identification of their cross-sectional areas. Excess ACSF is removed from the sample and the sections places between the electrodes. The impedance is measured across the frequency range and electrical conductivity calculated. Results show two regions of dispersion. A low frequency region is evident below approximately 10 kHz, and a high frequency dispersion above this. Results at the higher frequencies show a good fit to the Cole-Cole model of impedance of biological tissue; this model consists of resistive and non-linear capacitive elements. Physically, these elements are likely to arise due to membrane polarization and migration of ions both intra- and extra-cellularly.

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  • Use of Accelerated Laboratory Evaluation by Extended Nurse Prescribers: A tool to improve practice?

    Cameron, Marie (2007-11-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bacground – Because of the link between inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and antibiotic resistance, several strategies have been implemented to decrease inappropriate prescribing and improve prescribing practices. As 80% of antibiotic prescribing takes place in primary care, this area has often been the focus of these attempts. An example of such a strategy is the Accelerated Bacteriological Laboratory Evaluation (ABLE) service in Grampian, which provides an overnight microbiology results service. Aim - To describe the knowledge and use of the Accelerated Bacteriological Laboratory Evaluation (ABLE) service by Extended Nurse Prescribers in Grampian (UK). Methodology – Quantitative - Anonymous, self-completed, postal questionnaire of all regional Extended Nurse Prescribers, informed by a preliminary content-setting focus group. Analysis – Descriptive statistics (thematic analysis of focus group). Key Findings – Response rate was 74% (35/47) and 57% (20) of respondents were practice nurses. Eighty nine percent (31) of respondents knew about the ABLE service, and 88% (30) had used it, with 73% (22) using it often. Over half of respondents (55%) stated that they had insufficient information to allow them to make best use of the service. The main barrier to ABLE use was difficulty accessing results (50%/6). The main motivator for ABLE use was the desire to prescribe the correct antibiotic (71%/17). Conclusions – Although the majority of respondents were aware of the ABLE service and have used it, more information at more regular intervals is needed to encourage maximal use. Respondents were more likely to use the service for some conditions than others. Inclusion of information about ABLE in the Extended Nurse Prescribing course followed by regular postal and/or electronic reminders/updates would be preferred. These changes and the expansion of accelerated laboratory evaluation nationwide may help to reduce and improve prescribing practices.

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  • Novel release method proves successful: The gum leaf skeletoniser parasitoid Cotesia urabae establishes in two new locations

    Gresham, BA; Withers, TM; Avila Olesen, Gonzalo; Berndt, LA (2014-08-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Australian braconid wasp Cotesia urabae was first released in New Zealand in 2011, as a biological control agent for the gum leaf skeletoniser Uraba lugens (Lepidoptera: Nolidae). The larvae of this moth predominantly attack Eucalyptus spp. (Class: Symphyomyrtus) and, since its predicted future geographic range is extensive, there is concern it could become a serious pest of eucalypt plantations in New Zealand. Initial releases of C. urabae using adult parasitoids were made in Auckland at three separate sites between January and June 2011. Cotesia urabae established at each site and preliminary monitoring has revealed that the wasps have naturally dispersed to six other sites, ranging up to 6 km from an initial release site. In January 2012, C. urabae were released in Whangarei and Tauranga, trialling a novel method using parasitoid-attacked host larvae, rather than adult parasitoids. This method proved to be successful, with establishment now confirmed in both of these locations, and also provided greater flexibility. The two latest releases were made using the same method in Nelson (October 2013) and Napier (February 2014), but it is not yet known if the parasitoid has successfully established in these locations.

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  • An examination of the extent of adult neurogenesis in the carpet shark (Cephaloscyllium isabellum)

    Finger, JSH; Kubke, Maria; Wild, JM; Montgomery, JC (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Following Altman’s and Kirsche’s challenge to the dogma that no new neurons could be produced during adulthood in the 1960’s, adult neurogenesis was shown in most vertebrate lineages. From a phylogenetic point of view, adult neurogenesis is not an uncommon event, having been demonstrated in reptiles and birds, amphibians, bony fi shes and mammals. At present, however, adult neurogenesis has not been examined in cartilagineous fi shes, the stem line of vertebrates. Sharks are an ideal group in which to study the extent of adult neurogenesis for several reasons: (i) they exhibit continuous body growth throughout life; (ii) in the stingray the number of peripheral axons and neurons continues to increase into adult life; and (iii) in adult gray reef sharks the number of inner ear hair cells also continues to increase. We have begun to evaluate the extent of adult neurogenesis in the carpet shark (Cephaloscyllium isabellum). A specimen of C isabellum was injected i.p. with 230 mg/kg of BrdU, anaesthetised and perfused after 2 hrs. The brain was cryoprotected and cut at 40 μm, and processed following standard immunocytochemical techniques. BrdU was found in a small number of nuclei in close proximity to the ventricular surface, in a similar position than occasional cells labelled with an antibody aginst β-tubuline (III). Some BrdU labelled nuclei were also found throughout the brain that were not stained with our neuronal marker. These preliminary data suggest that adult neurogenesis occurs in sharks and that like in bony fi shes, but unlike birds and mammals, it may also occur in non-telencephalic areas. If widespread adult neurogenesis can be unequivocally demonstrated in sharks, it would indicate that it represents the primitive condition. This therefore raises the question of what modifi cations in brain evolution of modern vertebrate lineages led to the restriction of this ability to specifi c forebrain areas.

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  • Human Activities Modify Bacterial Diversity in Stream Benthic Biofilm Communities

    Lewis, Gillian; Roberts, Kelly; Turner, Susan; Lear, Gavin (2008-06-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study tests the hypothesis that human impact is an important driver of stream biofilm bacterial population diversity. The seasonal bacterial composition of biofilm in 4 streams with different levels of human impact was determined over 2 years. Bacterial diversity derived from 16S rDNA clone libraries, shows both between stream differences and seasonal transitions in bacterial occurrence and population dominance at a class and genus level. Diversity analysis calculated on pooled seasonal data (class level identification) shows that while composition of the populations are different there is a similar level of both bacterial richness and bacterial diversity in each stream. Trends in bacterial occurrence suggest that the most degraded stream were dominated by cyanobacteria, the mid range impact streams by aeromonads and gamma proteobacteria, while the unimpacted stream showed both high diversity and no dominance by any particular class.

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  • Methodology to set up minimum pasteurisation conditions for high acid shelf-stable foods

    Oliveira, Maria; Gibbs, PA (2007-11-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New technologies, social media and spatial representations: Auckland’s public space of spectacle and consumption

    Manfredini, Manfredo; Jenner, Gordon (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The virtual public thing: Or about the res publica in the post-consumerist society

    Manfredini, Manfredo; Jenner, R (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Evidence for the intensive-exposure and cross-sex transmission hypotheses in epidemic poliomyelitis mortality patterns in southern Ontario, 1910–1937

    Battles, Heather (2013-04-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poliomyelitis was a major emerging epidemic disease in the early 20th century, and models of its epidemiology continue to be revised. Nielsen and colleagues have recently presented two new hypotheses: 1) that polio severity is related to intensity of exposure, creating a U-shaped age curve rather than a linear increase in severity with age, and 2) that polio severity increases when transmission occurs between opposite sexes, and therefore the sex ratio in severe polio cases will be more equal when family sizes are larger. Data for polio deaths in Ontario’s Wentworth and York Counties from 1900-1937 were gathered from a variety of archival sources, including birth, marriage, and death registrations and census records, and entered into an Excel database. Analysis of mortality patterns in this sample revealed two distinct stages within the study period, discussed in part here. Stage One (1910 to 1927) is characterized by an equal sex ratio and a median known family size of 4. Stage Two (1928 to 1937) is characterized by excess male deaths and a median known family size of 2. For 1910-1937 inclusive, the sex ratio for ages 0-19 was 2.6 in families of 1-2 children and 0.9 in families of ≥3 children. A U-shaped age curve was observed in the 1928-1937 period, with a dip at ages 7-8, but not in 1910-1927. These results support Nielsen and colleagues’ cross-sex transmission hypothesis and intensive-exposure model, tying polio mortality patterns to demographic shifts in the early 20th century and indicating further research is warranted. This research was supported by funding from SSHRC (Canada Graduate Scholarship), OGS (Ontario Graduate Scholarship), and McMaster University Department of Anthropology.

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