277 results for Conference poster

  • Investigations At Hi-SEAS into Team Function and Performance on Long Duration Exploration Missions

    Binsted, KA; Basner, M; Bedwell, W; Caldwell, Bryan; Chang, D; Hunter, J; Kozlowski, S; Nasrini, J; Roma, P; Santoro, J; Seibert, M; Shiro, B; Wu, P (2016-02-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    HI-SEAS HI-SEAS (Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, www.hi-seas.org) is a habitat on an isolated Mars-like site on the Mauna Loa side of the saddle area on the Big Island of Hawaii at approximately 8200 feet above sea level. HI-SEAS is unique, in addition to its setting in a distinctive analog environment, as: - we select the crew to meet our research needs (in contrast, at serendipitous analogs, such as Antarctic stations, crew selection criteria are not controlled by researchers); - the conditions (habitat, mission, communications, etc.) are explicitly designed to be similar to those of a planetary exploration mission; - the site is accessible year round, allowing longer-duration isolated and confined environment studies than at other locations; - the Mars-like environment offers the potential for analog tasks, such as geological field work by human explorers and/or robots. The ability to select crew members to meet research needs and isolate them in a managed simulation performing under specific mission profiles makes HI-SEAS ideal for detailed studies in space-flight crew dynamics, behaviors, roles and performance, especially for long-duration missions. MISSIONS TO DATE As of February 2016, there have been three missions completed at HI-SEAS, two of four months in length, and one of eight months. The fourth mission, which is twelve months long, is currently under way, and will end in August 2016. UPCOMING MISSIONS The next cycle of missions will see the research focus at HI-SEAS shift from crew cohesion and performance to crew composition. We expect the first of three eight-month missions to start in late 2016. CURRENT RESEARCH The current research projects being carried out at HI-SEAS focus on crew cohesion, function and performance. Preliminary results from each of these projects are being presented in detail by the co-authors separately at this meeting. This presentation will provide an overview of the research conducted to date, and the plans for the future. OPPORTUNISTIC RESEARCH In order to maximize research return, and to provide HI-SEAS crews with a realistic workload, we welcome proposals for opportunistic research to be carried out during HI-SEAS missions. Proposed projects must a) advance human space exploration by addressing NASA’s needs and requirements; b) require a long-duration analog for desired research outcomes; and c) not confound the primary research. If you are interested in submitting an opportunistic research proposal, please contact the first author.

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  • Protein-Based Identification of Epithelial Cell Types in Forensic Samples

    Simons, Joanne; Vintiner, SK (2007-09-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although the value of DNA profiles found at a crime scene is indisputable, there is increasing importance in identifying the cellular source of the DNA as well as the identity of the person to whom the profile belongs. Knowledge regarding the cellular source from which the DNA profile originates increases the evidential value of the sample. Our research involves investigation of protein candidates in order to find an epithelial cell type-specific protein that will enable differentiation of vaginal, buccal and skin cells in forensic samples. We have used several methods including histochemical stains, western analysis and immunohistochemistry to investigate candidate proteins known to be present in various types of epithelial cells. Our most current results from these studies will be presented here.

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  • Neonatal invasive pneumococcal disease in NewZealand in the era of conjugate pneumococcal vaccination 2009 - 2013

    Burton, C; Mount, V; Jackson, C; Heffernan, H; Best, Emma (2014-11-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Appropriate Antibiotics for Empyema at Starship Children’s Hospital

    Burton, C; Price, Neil; Best, Emma (2014-11-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Reverse Mentoring: Benefits and Barriers

    Ross, M; Dunham, Annette (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Current research suggests that the modern workforce is comprised of a substantial proportion of ageing employees, in addition to an influx of young, first-time workers. This diverse and multigenerational workforce provides organisations an interesting challenge, in retaining engaged and productive employees, and ensuring relevant training and development. One specific management practice is reverse mentoring. Reverse mentoring is a unique form of mentoring, whereby the traditional roles of mentor and mentee are reversed. It involves a junior employee (in age/status) mentoring a senior employee. The junior employee is able to share their recent generational learnings and perspective with a senior organisational member, who gains insight into recent trends and technologies. Whilst there appear to be many benefits from this relationship, including increased communication and understanding; leadership development; and upskilling in relevant trends, there may also be some barriers to the success of the relationship. Barriers may include a resistance to the shift in power hierarchy and challenges with changing the traditional learning pedagogy of older teacher and younger learner. Aim: Reverse mentoring is a reasonably modern concept, and as such, empirical research on this practice is relatively new. This research aims to explore any benefits and barriers experienced in a reverse mentoring relationship. Method: Participants in this study will be recruited from a Melbourne hospital, who currently run a formal reverse mentoring relationship program. Approximately 16 individuals (8 mentors and 8 mentees), will be invited to participate. The proposed study uses a qualitative method of data collection, through semi-structured interviews. Interviews will be recorded, and responses will be transcribed, with thematic analysis used to identify common themes. Thematic analysis allows the common themes and experiences of mentors and mentees, to tell an overall story of the data. Conclusion: The proposed study’s findings contribute to a currently small base of research on reverse mentoring. It is hoped that the research will help (i) inform future quantitative research on reverse mentoring and (ii) inform organisational strategies that will help employees engage in reverse mentoring relationships in ways that effectively support their training and development.

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  • Pride and Prejudice: Social Workers’ Experiences of the Profession

    Staniforth, Barbara; Beddoe, Elizabeth (2016-06-28)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Development of an organisational memory scale

    Dunham, Annette (2007-12-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In many countries, people are retiring earlier than ever before and the retirement of the baby boom generation over the next two decades further intensifies the impact of this trend. Accompanying this development, are fears about the potential loss of organisational knowledge or memory which may equate to the loss of the organisation’s competitive advantage. Organisations, while recognizing that older workers often possess valuable “organisational memory” seem to also assume these same workers will readily divest themselves of their knowledge. Encouraging experienced workers to act as a mentor to younger or less experienced workers, is often mentioned in the management and related literature as a way of capturing and retaining valuable organisational knowledge. However, employees (including older workers) in the possession of considerable organisational memory, may, or may not be willing to divulge their knowledge to others, for a number of reasons. This poster presents initial results from the first of a series of studies designed to examine the relationship between organisational memory in the individual and propensity to mentor. It outlines the development and exploratory factor analysis of an “Organisational Memory” scale that taps the individual’s own resources in terms of organisational knowledge and expertise. Subsequent studies in the proposed research aim to help organisations more effectively target potential mentors for the purposes of retaining organisational knowledge, while also identifying the relevant costs and benefits of mentoring perceived by those individuals. By doing so it is hoped organisations will have a clearer understanding of how they can minimize costs while emphasising the benefits of such a relationship for the potential mentor. In contrast to the “development outcomes” focus of much of the mentoring literature, these studies give attention to the “knowledge sharing role of mentoring, while also touching on developmental outcomes, in this case, for the mentor

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  • Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma - aiming for zero recurrence

    Doyle, Anthony; Graydon, A; French, JG; Hanlon, M (2016-04-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over a 13 year period, a single radiologist (AJD) performed radiofrequency ablation (RFA)of osteoid osteoma in 32 patients. The lesions were located mostly in the lower extremities (femur N=15, tibia N=9) and spine (N=5). Lesion size varied from 4 to 18 mm, average 10 mm. Patient age ranged from 5 to 23 years, average 14 years. All but two had RFA as their primary treatment, with two treated after surgical excision had resulted in recurrence. CT guidance was used for all procedures, performed under general anaesthetic. A variety of different radiofrequency generators and probes were used. No complications occurred. None of the patients showed any signs of recurrence and none required further intervention. Although the followup period varied (and a few patients were lost to followup after a few weeks), most of the patients were followed for at least 12 months post procedure, with maximum followup seven years. We conclude that, with careful technique, the recurrence rate for RFA of osteoid osteoma can approach zero. Details of technique are discussed in the poster itself.

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  • Baby, Baby: Pregnant Again After Postnatal Depression

    Cowie, Susan (2008-09-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Depression following birth has wide ranging impacts on the woman, her new baby and her family. Studies indicate that treatment has been effective in shortening the duration of depression but does not prevent the increased risk of experiencing depression following another birth. This study explores in detail women’s and practitioners understandings of first time mother’s experiences of and recovery from depression and then focus on how the women prepare for and make sense of the experience of second time pregnancy and motherhood. It is hoped to develop strategies to reduce recurrence and impact of depression in women with young children. Results are presented of interviews with 25 women who had previously experienced post natal depression. Interviews were conducted 3-6 months before birth, focusing firstly on how the women make sense of their transition to first time motherhood and coping with/recovery from depression and secondly, on their expectations of second time birth and motherhood. The second interview, completed 3 months after birth, focused on their experience of the pregnancy, birth, and life with another child. Qualitative methodologies were employed. Of particular interest were the things that women described as helpful and unhelpful, their understanding of the help/treatment (e.g. Home help, CBT, support group, Arapax) they had gained and how this influenced their decisions and coping second time round. Preliminary analyses, particularly of time one data (collection complete), are reported and issues related to the study design and implementation are discussed.

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  • The effect of aspirin and smoking on excretion of lactulose and mannitol in fit young women: Towards an aspirin augmented test of gut permeability

    Sequeira, Ivana; Lentle, RG; Kruger, MC; Hurst, RD (2012-07-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Persistent radial glial cells in the adult human and sheep SVZ differentially express Fatty Acid Binding proteins (FABPs)

    Dieriks, Birger; Dean, JM; Faull, Richard; Curtis, Maurice (2014-07-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Insulin and IGF1 modulate PSA-NCAM turnover in a process involving specific extracellular matrix components

    Monzo, HJ; Park, TIH; Dieriks, Birger; Jansson, D; Dragunow, Michael; Curtis, Maurice (2014-07-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • LiDAR and EM conductivity investigation of a Holocene coastal landslide complex: Pourewa Landslide Zone, Auckland, New Zealand

    Liu, S; Brook, Martin; Richards, NP; Bevan, D; Prebble, W (2016-12-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Rapid mapping of a Holocene coastal landslide using Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry: Ohuka Landslide, Port Waikato, New Zealand

    Bevan, D; Brook, MS; Tunnicliffe, Jon; Prebble, W (2016-12-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Quaternary geology of the Auckland urban region, New Zealand: geotechnical properties and engineering implications

    Brook, Martin; Roberts, R; France, S; Williams, AL; Prebble, W (2016-12-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New antifungal and antibacterial compounds: 1,3-oxazoline- and 1,3-oxazolidine-2-thiones

    Oliveira, Maria; Justino, J; Silva, S; Tatibouet, A; Rollin, P; Rauter, AP (2009-01-20)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Use of whole-community bacterial indicators to monitor ecological health, function and variability within freshwater stream biofilms.

    Lear, Gavin; Smith, Joanna; Roberts, Kelly; Boothroyd, Ian; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study describes the extent of variability in biofilm bacterial community structure across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and assesses whether this may be used as an indicator of stream ecological health and function. A community DNA fingerprinting technique (Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis - ARISA) was used to examine the structure of bacterial communities within freshwater stream biofilms. When compared with macrobenthic invertebrate community assemblages using multi-dimensional scaling techniques, similar broad-scale trends in population structure were revealed between organisms at these different trophic levels. For both communities, spatial variability in community structure was greater between streams than within each site, or compared to temporal variability measured over 1 year. Distance-based redundancy analysis of both bacterial ARISA and macroinvertebrate data estimated that the largest cause of variation in community structure was due to differences in catchment land-use, rather than any single water quality parameter (e.g. ph or ammoniacal nitrogen). Multidimensional scaling of ARISA data also revealed significant differences in community structure between urban, and less impacted stream sites, providing evidence that whole-bacterial communities could be used as an indicator of freshwater ecological health, analogous to the way that macroinvertebrate communities have been used for many years. In conclusion, we propose the analysis of whole bacterial communities as a cost-effective, high throughput alternative indicator of freshwater ecological health.

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  • Unusual Bacterially mediated manganese-based structures within biofilms from urban streams.

    Smith, Joanna; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The objectives of this study were to describe the occurrence and nature of unusual brown “doughnut”-shaped microbial structures present within the biofilms of several urban streams in Auckland, New Zealand, and the bacteria responsible for their formation. These structures, termed anelli, were observed with light and scanning electron microscopy to be shallow conical microcolonies consisting of a ring, enriched in manganese and iron, surrounding a central pore. Bacteria were observed to reside within the pores, although anelli seen within biofilms were frequently vacant structures. A manganese depositing, anellus-forming bacterium (JOSHI_001) was isolated on solid media, and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed this bacterium to belong to the order Burkholderiales within the class β-proteobacteria, closely related to the manganese-depositing genus Leptothrix. The presence of anelli within biofilms was found to require Mn(II), however, elevated levels of this element within stream water did not necessarily result in growth of anelli. Anelli were only dominant structures within biofilms from those stream sites subjected to a high level of anthropogenic impact, suggesting that Mn(II) may not be the only factor influencing competitive capability. Investigation of additional streams within the Auckland region, influenced by a range of different types of anthropogenic impact is ongoing. Molecular analysis indicated that although anelli were structurally dominant, the β-proteobacteria comprised only a minor component of the bacterial community present within the biofilms. JOSHI_001 may have a significant impact on geochemical cycling and stream ecology within streams subjected to high levels of anthropogenic impact.

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  • Elaborations on a theory of human problem solving

    Langley, Patrick; Trivedi, N (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this paper, we present an extended account of human problem solving and describe its implementation within ICARUS, a theory of the cognitive architecture. We begin by reviewing the standard theory of problem solving, along with how previous versions of ICARUS have incorporated and expanded on it. Next we propose four additional elaborations that bring the framework into closer alignment with human problem-solving abilities. After this, we report results on a number of domains that demonstrate the benefits of these extensions. In closing, we discuss related work and note promising directions for additional research.

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  • An Architecture for Flexible Problem Solving

    Langley, Patrick; Emery, Miranda; Barley, Michael; Maclellan, C (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The literature on problem solving in both humans and machines has revealed a diverse set of strategies that operate in different manners. In this paper, we review this great variety of techniques and propose a five-stage framework for problem solving that accounts for this variation in terms of differences in strategic knowledge used at each stage. We describe the framework and its implementation in some detail, including its encoding of problems and their solutions, its representation of domain-level and strategy-level knowledge, and its overall operation. We present evidence of the framework’s generality and its ability to support many distinct problem-solving strategies, including one that is novel and interesting. We also report experiments that show the framework’s potential for empirical comparisons of different techniques. We conclude by reviewing other work on flexible approaches to problem solving and considering some directions for future research.

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