277 results for Conference poster

  • Refractive errors in the Maldives: a pilot study

    Kandel, H; Kaphle, D; Gyawali, R; Khanal, Safal; Upadhyaya, S (2014-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Do you see what I see? - Surveillance and response

    Patel, Reena; Dixon, Robyn; Webster, Craig (2015-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: Early warning scoring systems and rapid response teams are important strategies to improve the detection of patient deterioration in hospitals. Initiation of an appropriate response relies on nurses recognising changes in patient condition and alerting the required emergency assistance team. Study Objective: To determine the level of concordance between the nurse’s assessment and that of the emergency team, based on early warning scores (EWS). Methods: An audit of data collected between June 2011 and May 2013 was undertaken and 2780 instances were reviewed in order to determine the degree of concordance on EWS scores between nurses initiating calls and those assigned by the emergency response team. Results: 881 instances lack of concordance was identified. In the majority of instances, the nurse overestimated the severity of the patient’s condition when compared to the emergency response team’s score. Conclusion: Such lack of concordance is problematic given that failure to activate an emergency response when required has obvious implications for patient safety while inappropriate referral to emergency response teams can result in inefficient use of resources.

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  • Household Characteristics of Children Under Two Years Admitted with Lower Respiratory Infection in South Auckland

    Vogel, A; Trenholme, A; Lennon, Diana; McBride, C; Stewart, Joanna; Best, Emma; Mason, H; Siatu'u, Teuila (2011-04-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The STn-SNc hyperdirect pathway modulates dopaminergic neuron activity by inhibiting GABAergic inputs from the SNr via endocannabinoids

    Freestone, Peter; Wu, XH; de Guzman, G; Lipski, Janusz (2014-07-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The hyperdirect pathway of the basal ganglia circuitry terminates with a glutamatergic projection from the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) to the Substantia Nigra pars compacta (SNc). We recently showed that glutamate released in the SNc drives endocannabinoid production in dopaminergic neurons, which in turn inhibits GABAergic transmission in that region. The present study investigated the potential role of STN glutamatergic projections of the hyperdirect pathway in this novel endocannabinoid modulatory mechanism. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from SNc dopaminergic neurons in horizontal brain slices (rat) containing STN, SNc and Substantia Nigra pars reticulata (SNr) regions. Either electrical (bi-polar electrode) or pharmacological (local carbachol application) stimulation of the STN was performed to evoke selective glutamate release from terminals in the SNc. GABAergic inputs to the SNc from the SNr were electrically stimulated to evoke inhibitory post-synaptic currents (eIPSCs). Single-pulse electrical stimulation of the STN caused transient (< 1 sec) attenuation of GABAergic eIPSCs amplitudes recorded from dopaminergic neurons (to 73% of control). The eIPSC attenuation was prevented by block of either cannabinoid CB1 receptors with rimonabant (3 µM) or metabotropic glutamate mGluR1 receptors with CPCCOEt (100 µM). Pharmacological activation of STN neurons by rapid local perfusion of muscarinic agonist carbachol (100 µM, 10 s) caused a similar attenuation of eIPSC amplitude. These findings show that glutamate release from STN terminals in the SNc modulates GABAergic transmission through endocannabinoid signalling – a previously undescribed function of the hyperdirect pathway.

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  • Collaborative Problem Solving for Do-ers and Teachers of Mathematics

    Sheryn, Sarah; Frankcom, G; Ledger, G (2014-11-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study sought to explore and analyse the phenomenon of maths anxiety within a real-life context, and to identify if levels of maths anxiety can be reduced through participation in a reciprocal teaching process. This poster presents a small element of the larger study, which investigated how to reduce maths anxiety in teacher candidates. Maths anxiety is a well-researched phenomenon that is known to impede the successful mathematics teaching and learning experiences of some teacher candidates. The maths anxiety these students bring to their mathematics education courses results in poor quality mathematics teaching (Biddulph 1999; Frankcom 2006; Sloan 2010). Mathematics education lecturers have become increasingly aware of how some students become visibly anxious when they walk into the mathematics classroom, and/or are asked to collaborate to solve mathematical problems. These observations are supported by the level of maths anxiety reported by these students. The model developed for this study was informed by the work of Palinscar and Brown (1984) and complemented by problem-solving models from Mullis, et al. (2008), Reilly, Parsons and Bortolot (2009), and Polya (1945). The Revised Reciprocal Teaching Model (RRTM) was designed is to facilitate teacher candidates’ access to mathematical practices used in schools, and simultaneously develop their personal mathematical knowledge and understanding. Cognisant of the problem solving and peer mentoring literature, researchers provided opportunities for graduates to develop adaptive expertise. While peer mentoring is thoroughly established in literacy education it is under-researched within mathematics education. Reciprocal teaching falls within this area of research and provides a framework for individuals to mutually support each other while learning. The RRTM was developed to promote discourse within mathematical communities in an attempt to reduce maths anxiety. The implementation of the RRTM was through a two-phased structured framework, designed to take place over a university calendar year. The framework began with specific training of peer mentors who in turn worked with assigned mentees. The second phase promoted less reliance on the peer mentors and resulted in the students forming their own peer mentoring groups outside of class time. Results suggest that the model has a positive effect on students’ ability to confidently talk about and solve mathematical problems. This is evidenced by the decrease in maths anxiety levels self-reported by teacher candidates. This research indicates the RRTM has the potential to reduce maths anxiety levels of teacher candidates and produce confident do-ers and teachers of mathematics.

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  • A case of overwhelming sepsis in splenectomised child

    Alkhudairi, Z; Wilson, E; Best, Emma (2015-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Reducing the Risks of Long-Term Human Space Exploration by Simulating Missions in an Analog Environment on Mauna Loa

    Binsted, K; Hunter, JB; Caldwell, Bryan (2012-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Measuring the electrical impedance of mouse brain cortex

    Wilson, MT; Elbohouty, M; Lin, Oliver; Voss, LJ; Jones, K; Steyn-Ross, DA (2014)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We report on an experimental method to measure conductivity of cortical tissue. We use a pair of 5mm diameter Ag/AgCl electrodes in a Perspex sandwich device that can be brought to a distance of 400 microns apart. The apparatus is brought to uniform temperature before use. Electrical impedance of a sample is measured across the frequency range 20 Hz-2.0 MHz with an Agilent 4980A four-point impedance monitor in a shielded room. The equipment has been used to measure the conductivity of mature mouse brain cortex in vitro. Slices 400 microns in thickness are prepared on a vibratome. Slices are bathed in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) to keep them alive. Slices are removed from the ACSF and sections of cortical tissue approximately 2 mm times 2 mm are cut with a razor blade. The sections are photographed through a calibrated microscope to allow identification of their cross-sectional areas. Excess ACSF is removed from the sample and the sections places between the electrodes. The impedance is measured across the frequency range and electrical conductivity calculated. Results show two regions of dispersion. A low frequency region is evident below approximately 10 kHz, and a high frequency dispersion above this. Results at the higher frequencies show a good fit to the Cole-Cole model of impedance of biological tissue; this model consists of resistive and non-linear capacitive elements. Physically, these elements are likely to arise due to membrane polarization and migration of ions both intra- and extra-cellularly.

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  • An optimal sampling schedule for neonates, infants & children receiving cefazolin +/- vancomycin for cardiopulmonary bypass

    Sturge, Jacqueline; Anderson, Brian; Holford, Nicholas (2016-08-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Dosing of prophylactic antibiotics in children during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) remains poorly defined. Pharmacokinetic (PK) studies can be improved using optimal design when sampling is limited, or multiple factors influence PK. We aimed to optimize a sampling schedule designed to determine cefazolin and vancomycin PK in children undergoing CPB. Methods: A one compartment distribution model for vancomycin and a three compartment distribution model for cefazolin was used with theory based allometric scaling and maturation to describe first-order elimination clearance. The CPB circuit was represented by an additional compartment. We assumed 60 subjects received cefazolin 50 mg.kg-1, with 50 of these subjects undergoing a procedure with CPB. We assumed 15 subjects also received 15 mg.kg-1 vancomycin. Optimal times for up to 8 samples per patient were estimated, ignoring CPB effects, using WinPOPT (University of Otago, New Zealand). Optimal sampling times for determination of CPB related changes were considered separately. Designs were selected based on relative standard errors (RSEs) for model parameters and comparison of criterions summarizing design efficiency. Results: Sample times were 0.001, 0.001, 0.108, 0.36, 1.05, 1.85 h following the first dose, and 0.36 and 2.5 h after the second dose, for With CPB subjects. Sample times were 0.127, 0.43, 0.43, 1.3, 3.18, 6, 6 h after the first dose and 6 h after the second dose, for Without CPB subjects. Five samples, taken directly from the CPB circuit, were required to adequately capture CPB related changes in CPB V and CL. RSE estimates of cefazolin, vancomycin and CPB circuit parameters for the final design were ≤ 30%, with the exception of one of the cefazolin volumes (V2) for which RSEs were 49%. Conclusion: The sampling schedule may be used in the planning of a clinical study of children receiving cefazolin and vancomycin during CPB.

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  • Use of Accelerated Laboratory Evaluation by Extended Nurse Prescribers: A tool to improve practice?

    Cameron, Marie (2007-11-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bacground – Because of the link between inappropriate antibiotic prescribing and antibiotic resistance, several strategies have been implemented to decrease inappropriate prescribing and improve prescribing practices. As 80% of antibiotic prescribing takes place in primary care, this area has often been the focus of these attempts. An example of such a strategy is the Accelerated Bacteriological Laboratory Evaluation (ABLE) service in Grampian, which provides an overnight microbiology results service. Aim - To describe the knowledge and use of the Accelerated Bacteriological Laboratory Evaluation (ABLE) service by Extended Nurse Prescribers in Grampian (UK). Methodology – Quantitative - Anonymous, self-completed, postal questionnaire of all regional Extended Nurse Prescribers, informed by a preliminary content-setting focus group. Analysis – Descriptive statistics (thematic analysis of focus group). Key Findings – Response rate was 74% (35/47) and 57% (20) of respondents were practice nurses. Eighty nine percent (31) of respondents knew about the ABLE service, and 88% (30) had used it, with 73% (22) using it often. Over half of respondents (55%) stated that they had insufficient information to allow them to make best use of the service. The main barrier to ABLE use was difficulty accessing results (50%/6). The main motivator for ABLE use was the desire to prescribe the correct antibiotic (71%/17). Conclusions – Although the majority of respondents were aware of the ABLE service and have used it, more information at more regular intervals is needed to encourage maximal use. Respondents were more likely to use the service for some conditions than others. Inclusion of information about ABLE in the Extended Nurse Prescribing course followed by regular postal and/or electronic reminders/updates would be preferred. These changes and the expansion of accelerated laboratory evaluation nationwide may help to reduce and improve prescribing practices.

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  • Functional analysis of the novel melanoma master-regulators

    Wang, Li (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Melanoma is a devastating form of cancer that is especially common in New Zealand and that is incompletely understood. In this project, we are using clinical microarray information about the function of tens of thousands of genes in melanoma patients. We are combining this clinical microarray information with microarray analysis of melanoma cells in the laboratory. In this laboratory analysis we have knocked down the expression of 75 different genes using a method known as siRNA. This clinical and laboratory data is combined mathematically using a method known as gene network analysis. This allows us to identify novel "master-regulators" of melanoma, which are seen as “hubs” in melanoma gene networks. These hubs may drive the uncontrolled growth of melanoma cells, and are likely to be useful as prognostic markers or new drug targets. We have already identified several novel melanoma gene network hubs using this method. The sequences encoding these hubs are cloning into an expression vector, and the candidate hub genes are then screened through a functional screening platform. Since we are interested the clinically important genes, we screen to identify those genes that may play a role in proliferation, sensitivity to drug-induced apoptosis, and survival. We will transfect all the candidate genes (alongside a negative vector only control and a positive control of Bcl-2) into 293T cells (human embryonic kidney cells containing the SV40large T antigen to promote episomal replication of transfected plasmids), and A375 cells (melanoma). We will screen for expressed gene function using assays for viable cell number (MTT), assays for cell cycle progression (flow cytometry), and apoptosis assays. In particular we will use the anti-neoplastic drug etoposide (VP16) to induce apoptosis in cells that have been transfected by these genes and controls, to assess gene product function in modifying the apoptosis induced by VP16. For clinically relevant network hub genes that appear to play a role in controlling proliferation, apoptosis and survival, we will home in further on their mechanism of action (the methods used will depend upon our hypotheses about the gene product's function). We hope some of those hubs may lead to novel diagnostic/prognostic assays and novel drug targets.

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  • Novel release method proves successful: The gum leaf skeletoniser parasitoid Cotesia urabae establishes in two new locations

    Gresham, BA; Withers, TM; Avila Olesen, Gonzalo; Berndt, LA (2014-08-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Australian braconid wasp Cotesia urabae was first released in New Zealand in 2011, as a biological control agent for the gum leaf skeletoniser Uraba lugens (Lepidoptera: Nolidae). The larvae of this moth predominantly attack Eucalyptus spp. (Class: Symphyomyrtus) and, since its predicted future geographic range is extensive, there is concern it could become a serious pest of eucalypt plantations in New Zealand. Initial releases of C. urabae using adult parasitoids were made in Auckland at three separate sites between January and June 2011. Cotesia urabae established at each site and preliminary monitoring has revealed that the wasps have naturally dispersed to six other sites, ranging up to 6 km from an initial release site. In January 2012, C. urabae were released in Whangarei and Tauranga, trialling a novel method using parasitoid-attacked host larvae, rather than adult parasitoids. This method proved to be successful, with establishment now confirmed in both of these locations, and also provided greater flexibility. The two latest releases were made using the same method in Nelson (October 2013) and Napier (February 2014), but it is not yet known if the parasitoid has successfully established in these locations.

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  • An examination of the extent of adult neurogenesis in the carpet shark (Cephaloscyllium isabellum)

    Finger, JSH; Kubke, Maria; Wild, JM; Montgomery, JC (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Following Altman’s and Kirsche’s challenge to the dogma that no new neurons could be produced during adulthood in the 1960’s, adult neurogenesis was shown in most vertebrate lineages. From a phylogenetic point of view, adult neurogenesis is not an uncommon event, having been demonstrated in reptiles and birds, amphibians, bony fi shes and mammals. At present, however, adult neurogenesis has not been examined in cartilagineous fi shes, the stem line of vertebrates. Sharks are an ideal group in which to study the extent of adult neurogenesis for several reasons: (i) they exhibit continuous body growth throughout life; (ii) in the stingray the number of peripheral axons and neurons continues to increase into adult life; and (iii) in adult gray reef sharks the number of inner ear hair cells also continues to increase. We have begun to evaluate the extent of adult neurogenesis in the carpet shark (Cephaloscyllium isabellum). A specimen of C isabellum was injected i.p. with 230 mg/kg of BrdU, anaesthetised and perfused after 2 hrs. The brain was cryoprotected and cut at 40 μm, and processed following standard immunocytochemical techniques. BrdU was found in a small number of nuclei in close proximity to the ventricular surface, in a similar position than occasional cells labelled with an antibody aginst β-tubuline (III). Some BrdU labelled nuclei were also found throughout the brain that were not stained with our neuronal marker. These preliminary data suggest that adult neurogenesis occurs in sharks and that like in bony fi shes, but unlike birds and mammals, it may also occur in non-telencephalic areas. If widespread adult neurogenesis can be unequivocally demonstrated in sharks, it would indicate that it represents the primitive condition. This therefore raises the question of what modifi cations in brain evolution of modern vertebrate lineages led to the restriction of this ability to specifi c forebrain areas.

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  • A trial of image-based dietary records to monitor intake and improve dietary habits, knowledge and behaviours in elite athletes

    Gemming, L; Simpson, A; Braakhuis, Andrea (2017-06-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Human Activities Modify Bacterial Diversity in Stream Benthic Biofilm Communities

    Lewis, Gillian; Roberts, Kelly; Turner, Susan; Lear, Gavin (2008-06-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study tests the hypothesis that human impact is an important driver of stream biofilm bacterial population diversity. The seasonal bacterial composition of biofilm in 4 streams with different levels of human impact was determined over 2 years. Bacterial diversity derived from 16S rDNA clone libraries, shows both between stream differences and seasonal transitions in bacterial occurrence and population dominance at a class and genus level. Diversity analysis calculated on pooled seasonal data (class level identification) shows that while composition of the populations are different there is a similar level of both bacterial richness and bacterial diversity in each stream. Trends in bacterial occurrence suggest that the most degraded stream were dominated by cyanobacteria, the mid range impact streams by aeromonads and gamma proteobacteria, while the unimpacted stream showed both high diversity and no dominance by any particular class.

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  • Duration of intravenous antibiotics post-operatively in complicated appendicitis: is there a difference in complication rates?

    Chung, L; Paterson, J; Devathasan, J; MacCormick, Andrew (2017)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Methodology to set up minimum pasteurisation conditions for high acid shelf-stable foods

    Oliveira, Maria; Gibbs, PA (2007-11-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New technologies, social media and spatial representations: Auckland’s public space of spectacle and consumption

    Manfredini, Manfredo; Jenner, Gordon (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The virtual public thing: Or about the res publica in the post-consumerist society

    Manfredini, Manfredo; Jenner, R (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Relationship Between University Student Motivation, Beliefs and Approaches to Learning and Local and Global Achievement

    Hamilton, Richard; Peterson, Elizabeth (2017-05-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The ways students approach a given learning task, their beliefs about what learning is, and their learning goals and motivation have all been argued to be important for academic achievement. To date most of these different components of learning have largely been studied in isolation and there is a dearth of research which includes all these factors and their relationship to learning outcomes within the tertiary sector This information is crucial to expanding researchers’ understanding of how these factors relate to university student achievement and to advance our knowledge of how best to facilitate higher levels of achievement within this population. The aim of the present study was to firstly develop a measurement model of the different approaches, goals and beliefs about learning and secondly to validate this model by exploring it’s relationship with local and global achievement within a tertiary sector context.

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