266 results for Conference poster

  • Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut Goal: Real-Time Segmentation via Graph Cut

    Vaudrey, Tobi; Wedel, Andreas; Rabe, Clemens; Klappstein, Jens; Klette, Reinhard (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand. IVCNZ 08. Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ The detection of moving objects is a crucial part of driver assistance systems. This paper tackles this issue using computer vision. Two approaches are investigated, monocular and stereoscopic. The base principals and implementational issues are discussed and detailed, high- lighting areas of concern. In both cases, the detection is based on motion analysis of individually tracked image points (optical ow). The monoc- ular approach relies solely on the optical ow, where as the stereoscopic approach also takes stereo depth information into account. In both ap- proaches the motion analysis provides a motion metric which corresponds to the likelihood that the tracked point is moving. Based on this metric the points are segmented into objects by employing the globally op- timal graph cut algorithm. These approaches are then compared and contrasted using real-world vehicle image sequences.

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  • An Approach for Evaluating Robustness of Edge Operators using Real-World Driving Scenes

    Al-Sarraf, Ali; Vaudrey, Tobi; Klette, Reinhard; Woo, Young Woon (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conference Details: 2008 23rd International Conference Image and Vision Computing New Zealand Lincoln University, Christchurch, 26-28 November 2008. http://www.lvl.co.nz/ivcnz2008/ Over the past 20 years there have been many papers that compare and evaluate di erent edge operators. Most of them focus on accuracy and also do comparisons against synthetic data. This paper focuses on real-world driver assistance scenes and does a comparison based on robustness. The three edge operators compared are Sobel, Canny and the under-publicized phase-based Kovesi-Owens operator. The Kovesi- Owens operator has the distinct advantage that it uses one pre-selected set of parameters and can work across almost any type of scene, where as other operators require parameter tuning. The results from our comparison show that the Kovesi-Owens operator is the most robust of the three, and can get decent results, even under weak illumination and varying gradients in the images. Keywords: edge operators, edge robustness evaluation, Kovesi-Owens, phase operators

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  • A case study on frontline perspectives of organizational change: A practitioner-academic partnership to analyse the creation of a Youth Justice entity in Child, Youth and Family

    Webster, Michael; Herrmann, Klaus (2009-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A frontline perspective of organizational change: Analyzing the creation of a Youth Justice entity in Child, Youth and Family using Lewin, Kotter & Schein's change management and organizational culture models

    Webster, Michael; Herrmann, K (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • 'Yes we can!': The emerging contribution of social work leadership to clinical governance and quality improvement in district health board mental health services

    McNabb, D; Webster, Michael (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Modelling NFAT Cycling Sensitivity in the Cardiac Myocyte

    Cooling, Michael; Hunter, Peter; Crampin, Edmund (2007-10-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The transcription factor NFAT acts as a signal integrator for a number of signal transduction pathways in cardiac myocytes that initiates gene expression in the disease Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy[1]. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of the cytoplasmicnuclear-cytoplasmic cycling of NFAT in response to calcium signals in the cardiac myocyte

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  • Apple Waste Preservation for Extraction of Antioxidants

    Zhan, D; Oliveira, Maria; Saleh, Z (2015-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A huge amount of apple waste is generated from juice, cider and other apple product industries. This waste represents a cost and causes environmental problems. Apple waste is a rich source of polyphenolic compounds, mostly found in the apple peels and cores. Polyphenols are antioxidants with high value that can be extracted from the waste and exploited commercially. Proper methods of waste pasteurisation would allow its preservation and reduce waste degradation. In this study, diluted apple waste was pasteurised using three different technologies: thermal processing (TP), high pressure processing (HPP) and low pressure assisted thermal processing. The effect of processing on the waste native yeasts and moulds, inoculated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and antioxidants were investigated. TP at 60, 80 and 100 °C for 30 min, HPP at 300, 400 and 500 MPa for 10 min and 600 MPa for 20 min, and low pressure assisted thermal processing at 60, 80 and 100 °C with 2 MPa for 30 min were carried out. The total yeasts and moulds initially in the diluted apple waste was about 6.6×101 cfu/g, which was fully inactivated by the three technologies. S. cerevisiae inoculated in the waste was reduced by 5-log or more with all processing methods/conditions. HPP and low pressure assisted thermal processing treatments did not affect the antioxidant activity (DPPH-radical scavenging). However, both TPC and DPPH radical scavenging decreased with TP (p < 0.05). The results of this study can be helpful for designing appropriate conditions to pasteurise fruit industry byproducts for further extraction of high value antioxidants.

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  • Considering clinical protocols and guidelines: what lessons for IPE?

    Barrow, Mark; Gasquoine, S (2016-08-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Interprofessional collaboration is enhanced if professionals work across discursive boundaries. While interprofessional education interventions may encourage this the practice environment may militate against the implementation of understandings developed in educational settings. Summary of work: Interviews with doctors and nurses highlighted differences between each professions’ views of clinical protocols and guidelines. This prompted us to conduct a critical discourse analysis of a number of clinical guidelines and the systems which guide their development and approval. Summary of results: Our analysis shows a range of discourses at work within clinical protocols régimes. Development and approval systems are dominated by collectivist discourses emphasising communication and collaboration within rigid bureaucratic systems. The protocols exemplify a neo-liberal discourse where people who are the objects of care are positioned as clients or consumers amenable to standardised aliquots of diagnosis and care, the level of which can be justified on the basis of scoring systems and claims related to a ‘scientific’ evidence base. The régimes also suggests (perhaps falsely) flattened hierarchical structures, a democratising discourse where all professional voices are equal in the provision of care. Discussion: A nursing identity relies on experience, holistic views of patients and collective approaches to practice. The medical identity is based on craft-based development of expertise associated with generating distinctive and sometime idiosyncratic responses to a patient’s needs. Each comes to protocols with different ‘agenda’. Conclusions: The collectivist discourse of protocol development does not seem to carry through to their utilisation. Protocols appear to act as objects that reinforce discursive boundaries between the groups. Take-home messages: Educators need to consider the effect of protocols on practice and account for this in the design of educational interventions. Understanding the discursive roll of protocols might help educators design more robust IPE programmes.

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  • Moving From Hard Copy to Online Marking Made Easy

    Li, C; Sheridan, Donald (2015-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Significant efficiencies can be made in marking classes with large enrolment using a workflow that involves existing or inexpensive technologies. This poster describes how innovative processes saved time, money, improved educational outcomes and quality assurance.

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  • Similar estimates of contrast sensitivity and acuity from psychophysics and automated analysis of optokinetic nystagmus

    Dakin, Steven; Turnbull, Philip (2016-05-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although the contrast sensitivity function (CSF) is a particularly useful way of characterising functional vision, its psychophysical measurement relies on observers being able to make reliable perceptual reports. This can be challenging e.g. when testing children. Here we describe a system for measuring the CSF without observer-report using an automated analysis of optokinetic nystagmus (OKN), an oscillatory eye movement made in response to moving stimuli (here, spatial-frequency - SF - band-pass noise). We show that predicting perceived direction using the proportion of eye movements that are consistent with OKN in the stimulus direction allows us to make an unbiased estimate of contrast sensitivity across SF. We next compare CSFs of 25 observers derived using either OKN or perceptual report. Both approaches yield near-identical CSFs that capture subtle inter-observer variations in acuity (R=0.80, p< 0.0001) and contrast sensitivity (R=0.80, p< 0.0001) amongst observers with ostensibly normal vision. A trial-by-trial analysis reveals that, even when observers' perceptual report is at chance, there is a very high correlation between our OKN-derived measure and observers' perceptual report. This indicates that OKN and self-report are likely tapping into a common neural mechanism providing further support for the proposal that OKN is a valid alternative to the current gold standard measures of CSF based on perceptual report. We discuss how our approach can be paired with an efficient psychophysical method to derive rapid automated measures of the CSF and other measures of functional vision.

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  • C/EBPδ Expression in Primary Human Glial Cells

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Smith, AM; Park, In; Jansson, D; Dragunow, Michael (2013-08-26)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Phagocytosis by human brain pericytes: implications for Alzheimer’s disease

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Scotter, Emma; Smyth, L; Park, In; Curtis, Maurice; Faull, Richard; Graham, S; Dragunow, Michael (2016-06-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Investigations At Hi-SEAS into Team Function and Performance on Long Duration Exploration Missions

    Binsted, KA; Basner, M; Bedwell, W; Caldwell, Bryan; Chang, D; Hunter, J; Kozlowski, S; Nasrini, J; Roma, P; Santoro, J; Seibert, M; Shiro, B; Wu, P (2016-02-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    HI-SEAS HI-SEAS (Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, www.hi-seas.org) is a habitat on an isolated Mars-like site on the Mauna Loa side of the saddle area on the Big Island of Hawaii at approximately 8200 feet above sea level. HI-SEAS is unique, in addition to its setting in a distinctive analog environment, as: - we select the crew to meet our research needs (in contrast, at serendipitous analogs, such as Antarctic stations, crew selection criteria are not controlled by researchers); - the conditions (habitat, mission, communications, etc.) are explicitly designed to be similar to those of a planetary exploration mission; - the site is accessible year round, allowing longer-duration isolated and confined environment studies than at other locations; - the Mars-like environment offers the potential for analog tasks, such as geological field work by human explorers and/or robots. The ability to select crew members to meet research needs and isolate them in a managed simulation performing under specific mission profiles makes HI-SEAS ideal for detailed studies in space-flight crew dynamics, behaviors, roles and performance, especially for long-duration missions. MISSIONS TO DATE As of February 2016, there have been three missions completed at HI-SEAS, two of four months in length, and one of eight months. The fourth mission, which is twelve months long, is currently under way, and will end in August 2016. UPCOMING MISSIONS The next cycle of missions will see the research focus at HI-SEAS shift from crew cohesion and performance to crew composition. We expect the first of three eight-month missions to start in late 2016. CURRENT RESEARCH The current research projects being carried out at HI-SEAS focus on crew cohesion, function and performance. Preliminary results from each of these projects are being presented in detail by the co-authors separately at this meeting. This presentation will provide an overview of the research conducted to date, and the plans for the future. OPPORTUNISTIC RESEARCH In order to maximize research return, and to provide HI-SEAS crews with a realistic workload, we welcome proposals for opportunistic research to be carried out during HI-SEAS missions. Proposed projects must a) advance human space exploration by addressing NASA’s needs and requirements; b) require a long-duration analog for desired research outcomes; and c) not confound the primary research. If you are interested in submitting an opportunistic research proposal, please contact the first author.

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  • Are doctoral theses changing over time?

    Brailsford, Ian; Sowden, Elizabeth; Orioli Figueira, Brigida (2016-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This poster presents longitudinal data on the length and chapter composition of 800 doctoral theses deposited at the University of Auckland between 2008 and 2015. Over this period, the doctoral statute has been amended to allow for more flexibility in the format of a thesis submitted for examination, such as the inclusion of creative practice and peer-reviewed publications. In addition, the funding mechanisms for doctorates in New Zealand have put a premium on candidates completing in a timely fashion. Given these two contexts we speculated that the length of an average doctoral thesis would be declining over time. One hundred doctoral theses – overwhelmingly PhD theses with a smattering of name doctorates –deposited in the University Library from each calendar year were randomly selected to assess: the number of pages; chapter composition; and inclusion of published papers within the thesis. These data were then correlated against academic faculty to tease out variations across the disciplines. Overall, our findings indicate that the doctoral thesis has remained relatively stable in length and chapter structure.

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  • Forbidden crystals: Penrose tiling with molecules

    Nam, SJ; Waterhouse, GIN; Ware, David; Brothers, Penelope (2015-02-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Since the first discovery of quasicrystals by mathematicians in the 1960s, quasicrystalline patterns which possess unusual symmetric orders have become an issue among mathematicians. Observation of 5-fold crystal symmetry in metal alloys in 1984 has attracted other scientists. Penrose tiling is the simplest quasicrystal comprised of only pentagon motifs. Although quasicrystals have been observed in alloys and soft matter states (polymers, colloids), no one has yet successfully generated full molecular quasicrystals. Only small pieces of molecular Penrose tiling have been reported. We are working on this challenge by using molecules with 5-fold symmetry as molecular ‘tiles’ to create 2-dimensional molecular Penrose tilings. Alignment of the tiles is the key to creating the quasicrystalline pattern. Possible candidates as tiles which must be synthetically accessible are croconate and its derivatives, macrocycles such as campestarene and supramolecules such as cucurbituril. The techniques of coordination and supramolecular chemistry will direct the ordering of the tiles. After deposition of the synthesised tiles on substrates, surface imaging (STM and AFM) and analytical techniques (XPS, LEED, GI-SAXS) will be used to investigate the resulting films.

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  • Applying threshold concepts to unlock the ‘hidden’ core of a multifaceted health sciences curriculum

    Petersen, Mary; Egan, John; Barrow, Mark (2015-07-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Title: Applying threshold concepts to unlock the ‘hidden’ core of a multifaceted health sciences curriculum Background/context: In 2014, a curriculum implementation plan was developed to comprehensively map the existing Bachelor of Health Sciences (BHSc) curriculum so as to inform a cohesive workforce-related vision for the future. However, prior to mapping the curriculum, staff first needed to agree upon what the future-focused set of graduate capabilities across their diverse programme should be. To do so, we applied Meyer and Land’s (2003) notion of threshold concepts to enable us to unpack and clarify what felt like a complex, and at times hidden, core curriculum. Research/evaluation method: The existing BHSc programme was analysed using the frame of threshold concepts through a series of staff and student focus group sessions. This led to a refining of six central threshold concepts for the degree. This in turn informed the revision of a set of programme-wide graduate capabilities. Pre-review course outlines (n=24) and assessments (n=104) were analysed using thematic coding in NVivo and then mapped against the proposed graduate capabilities and thresholds for the revised BHSc. Lecturers validated these data using co-constructed matrices to explore coverage of these thesholds across the programme. At the end of 2014, teaching staff involved in the curriculum project (n=14) completed an evaluation analysing their perception of the effects of applying threshold concepts to their own development, and to their BHSc programme knowledge development. Outcomes: Evaluation results indicate that staff now report a greater common sense of purpose, increased collegiality and a more clarified overarching vision for the BHSc programme (which encompasses at least six distinct pathways of learning within the health sciences). By applying the frame of threshold concepts to the programme curriculum, many staff reported surprise that ‘taken for granted’ competencies such as academic, information and professional literacies were not actually being systematically built upon across the three years of the BHSc. This has been the springboard to a programme-wide redevelopment of the BHSc core courses assisted by external health sector representatives. Additionally, two new complementary ‘capstone’ courses have been planned for stage three of the programme which will more purposefully address real-world, essential graduate capabilities. How the conference sub-themes are addressed (200 words): This poster focuses centrally on conference theme one by exploring how threshold concepts can assist the process of establishing what capabilities are required of (BHSc) graduates and how we can ensure these are responsive to (health) sector needs. It highlights examples from practice in the Bachelor of Health Sciences programme. We first show how an overarching programme purpose was reframed in conjunction with external sector input by utilising Meyer & Land’s notion of threshold concepts. Next we illustrate examples of effective tools and processes (co-constructed matrices) that were applied by academic staff to shed light on gaps and overlaps in existing core course content and assessment tasks. Related to this we address questions from conference theme three concerned with how we can assess, embed and evaluate these graduate capabilities once we have mapped them across our courses. Examples also illustrate the processes utilised in designing stage three ‘capstone’ courses to embed and assess these graduate capabilities.

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  • Protein-Based Identification of Epithelial Cell Types in Forensic Samples

    Simons, Joanne; Vintiner, SK (2007-09-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Although the value of DNA profiles found at a crime scene is indisputable, there is increasing importance in identifying the cellular source of the DNA as well as the identity of the person to whom the profile belongs. Knowledge regarding the cellular source from which the DNA profile originates increases the evidential value of the sample. Our research involves investigation of protein candidates in order to find an epithelial cell type-specific protein that will enable differentiation of vaginal, buccal and skin cells in forensic samples. We have used several methods including histochemical stains, western analysis and immunohistochemistry to investigate candidate proteins known to be present in various types of epithelial cells. Our most current results from these studies will be presented here.

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  • Neonatal invasive pneumococcal disease in NewZealand in the era of conjugate pneumococcal vaccination 2009 - 2013

    Burton, C; Mount, V; Jackson, C; Heffernan, H; Best, Emma (2014-11-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Appropriate Antibiotics for Empyema at Starship Children’s Hospital

    Burton, C; Price, Neil; Best, Emma (2014-11-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Annotation of Clinical Datasets Using openEHR Archetypes

    Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Atalag, Koray; de Bono, B; Hunter, Peter (2015-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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