277 results for Conference poster

  • Evidence for the intensive-exposure and cross-sex transmission hypotheses in epidemic poliomyelitis mortality patterns in southern Ontario, 1910–1937

    Battles, Heather (2013-04-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poliomyelitis was a major emerging epidemic disease in the early 20th century, and models of its epidemiology continue to be revised. Nielsen and colleagues have recently presented two new hypotheses: 1) that polio severity is related to intensity of exposure, creating a U-shaped age curve rather than a linear increase in severity with age, and 2) that polio severity increases when transmission occurs between opposite sexes, and therefore the sex ratio in severe polio cases will be more equal when family sizes are larger. Data for polio deaths in Ontario’s Wentworth and York Counties from 1900-1937 were gathered from a variety of archival sources, including birth, marriage, and death registrations and census records, and entered into an Excel database. Analysis of mortality patterns in this sample revealed two distinct stages within the study period, discussed in part here. Stage One (1910 to 1927) is characterized by an equal sex ratio and a median known family size of 4. Stage Two (1928 to 1937) is characterized by excess male deaths and a median known family size of 2. For 1910-1937 inclusive, the sex ratio for ages 0-19 was 2.6 in families of 1-2 children and 0.9 in families of ≥3 children. A U-shaped age curve was observed in the 1928-1937 period, with a dip at ages 7-8, but not in 1910-1927. These results support Nielsen and colleagues’ cross-sex transmission hypothesis and intensive-exposure model, tying polio mortality patterns to demographic shifts in the early 20th century and indicating further research is warranted. This research was supported by funding from SSHRC (Canada Graduate Scholarship), OGS (Ontario Graduate Scholarship), and McMaster University Department of Anthropology.

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  • Using Sampling to Dynamically Reconfigure Problem-Solvers

    Franco Aixela, Santiago; Barley, Michael (2008-07-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The time it takes a program to solve a particular problem depends heavily upon the choice of problem solving method, the data representation, heuristics etc. The specific choices can have a dramatic impact on performance. This research aims to produce a formula based on these design decisions and problem characteristics which predicts how long the problem will run until a solution is found. As means to this end we are working on a prototype problem solving method which dynamically adapts its search configuration in order to speed up finding a solution.

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  • Body composition and Metabolic changes after Sequential VLED and Bariatric surgery in .

    McGill, Anne-Thea; Chan, YK; Plank, L; McLeod, B; Beban, G; Falk, S; Wiessing, K; Poppitt, SD; Cooper, GJS (2010-07-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    3. Anne-Thea McGill¹,Yih-Kai Chan, Lindsay Plank, Briar McLeod, Grant Beban, Sofie Falk, Katy Wiessing, Sally D Poppitt, Garth JS Cooper. Body composition and Metabolic changes after Sequential VLED and Bariatric surgery in women. T2:PO.33. Obesity Reviews, Volume 11, Issue 1, Pages iii-iv, 1-502, July 2010 Special Issue Abstracts of the 11th International Congress on Obesity, 11-15 July 2010, Stockholm, Sweden

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  • Mitochondrial Respiration in Skeletal Muscle of Obese Women Prior To Bariatric Surgery and Following Six Months of Weight Loss

    MacDonald, J; McGill, Anne-Thea; Hickey, A; Plank, L; McLeod, B; Falk, S; Wiessing, K; Beban, G; Chan, YK; Xin, Liping; Cooper, GJS; Poppitt, SD (2010-07-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Clever Crosswalking - what do you take from one system to another?

    Zhao, Yanan; Shepherd, Kim; Hayes, Sharron; Schweer, A (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The poster looked at a metadata crosswalk implemented between a DSpace repository and a Research Management System (RMS) at the University of Auckland (UoA). The crosswalk facilitated the exposure of publication metadata from the internal RMS to the DSpace repository with the least amount of work and highest amount of accuracy.

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  • First born children have reduced insulin sensitivity, higher blood pressure and taller stature than later born children

    Savage, T; Ayyavoo, A; Mouat, F; Miles, H; Hofman, Paul; Cutfield, WS (2012-07-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cortisol response to Synacthen stimulation is attenuated following abusive head trauma

    Heather, N; Derraik, J; Brennan, C; Hofman, Paul; Jefferies, C; Cutfield, W (2012-06-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • What drives bacterial community structure in stream biofilms?

    Roberts, Kelly; Lear, Gavin; Turner, Susan; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    BACKGROUND The microorganisms within biofilms are the key basal trophic level within most freshwater systems. However, microbial structure, function and succession in natural stream systems remain poorly understood. This research characterises the biofilm community structure of stream biofilms experiencing different anthropogenic impacts and how they change over time. Our aim is describe the changes in bacterial biofilm communities over time and to investigate what drives these changes.

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  • Is keratoconus a case of matrix remodelling gone crazy?

    Brookes, Nigel; Loh, IP; Clover, GM; Poole, CA; Sherwin, Trevor (2002)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Islet human amylin oligomer formation is differentially correlated with β-cell death and diabetes onset between homozygous and hemizygous human amylin transgenic mice

    Zhang, S; Liu, H; Li, XL; Au, M; Chuang, CL; Cooper, GJS (2010)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    One of the pathological features of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the presence of islet amyloid deposits comprising mainly human amylin (hA)/hIAPP. Recent studies suggested that soluble oligomers of human amylin may be the primary cause of β-cell damage and thus contribute to the onset/development of T2DM. However, the molecular basis of this process remains to be fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate the connection between soluble oligomers and hA cytotoxicity, and their correlation with diabetes development using a rodent model of diabetes.

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  • Educating for disaster: Determining the core elements of a disaster curriculum for social work in New Zealand

    Adamson, Carole (2012)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2010 and 2011, Aotearoa New Zealand was hit by a number of major disasters involving loss of human life and severe disruption to social, ecological and economic wellbeing. The Pike River mine explosions were closely followed by a sequence of major earthquakes in Christchurch, seismic events that have permanently altered the lives of thousands of people in our third largest city, the closure of the central business district and the effective abandonment of whole residential areas. In early October 2011, the ship, Rena, grounded on a reef off the port of Tauranga and threatened a major oil spill throughout the Bay of Plenty, where local communities with spiritual and cultural connections to the land depend on sea food as well as thrive on tourism. The Council for Social Work Education Aotearoa New Zealand (CSWEANZ), representing all the Schools of Social Work in New Zealand, held a ‘Disaster Curriculum’ day in November 2011, at which social workers and Civil Defence leaders involved in the Christchurch earthquakes, the Rena Disaster, Fiji floods and the Boxing Day tsunami presented their narrative experience of disaster response and recovery. Workshops discussed and identified core elements that participants considered vital to a social work curriculum that would enable social work graduates in a range of community and cultural settings to respond in safe, creative and informed ways. We present our core ideas for a social work disaster curriculum and consider a wide range of educational content based on existing knowledge bases and new content within a disaster framework.

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  • The influence of the regional distribution of reduced lung elastic recoil on FEV1

    Hedges, KL; Hoffman, EA; Tawhai, MH (2010)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rationale: A link has been observed in several studies between the regional distribution of emphysema and the resulting magnitude of reduction in FEV1. The aim of this study is to examine how the loss of elastic recoil associated with emphysema that develops in localized regions of the lung results in the observed trends in FEV1 reduction.

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  • "But what about the theory?" Designing a social work curriculum around practice learning and reflection

    Adamson, Carole; Bellinger, A (2010-06-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curriculum design in an academic context operates within a site of tension characterised by the need

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  • Multi-dimensional model generalisation of human activity patterns in space and time

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Forer, Pip (2007-09-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Nonlinear dynamics of an electronic model of one-way coupling in one and two dimensions

    Doud, AB; Breen, Barbara; Grimm, JR; Tanasse, AH; Tanasse, SJ; Lindner, JF; Maxted, K (2011-03-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    One-way or unidirectional coupling is a striking example of how topological considerations -- the parity of an array of multistable elements combined with periodic boundary conditions -- can qualitatively influence dynamics. Here we introduce a simple electronic model of one-way coupling in one and two dimensions and experimentally compare it to an improved mechanical model and an ideal mathematical model. In two dimensions, computation and experiment reveal richer one-way coupling phenomenology: in media where two-way coupling would dissipate all excitations, one-way coupling enables soliton-like waves to propagate in different directions with different speeds.

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  • Probing Student Approaches and Engagement in Learning Chemistry at University.

    Salter, David; Simpson, MC; Hamilton, R (2011-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This project aims to identify students’ learning approaches, engagement, attitudes and success in chemistry classes that are service-taught as part of a specified health sciences programme and in chemistry classes that are taught as part of a chemistry major programme. It seeks to determine whether any differences exist in the learning approaches, motivational orientation and engagement, and compare the success of a cohort of students who are required to enrol in a compulsory chemistry course as part of a health sciences degree with that of a cohort of students who choose to enrol in a chemistry course with the possible intention of majoring in chemistry. It is intended that both cognitive and motivational individual difference variables are identified and relationships between students’ goal orientation and university academic success evaluated.

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  • Cells isolated from adult human brain. Are they fibroblasts, neural stem cells or both?

    Park, In; Gibbons, Hannah; Mee, EW; Teoh, HH; Faull, Richard; Dragunow, Michael (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The discovery of endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the adult human brain capable of migrating and differentiating in response to external stimuli has re-defined the field of neuroscience. In order to study and characterize these NPCs, research groups have attempted to culture them in vitro with varying success. Adult human NPCs are generally cultured from the two major neurogenic regions of the brain; the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. However, we propose that cells with similar characteristics to NPCs can be isolated and cultured from other regions of the adult human brain. Briefly, human brain cells were isolated from the middle temporal gyrus (MTG) of post-mortem and biopsy tissue and diced into small pieces prior to enzymatic digestion. The dissociated cells were plated onto poly-L-lysine (PLL) coated culture flasks. Initially the cells were maintained in media consisting of 10% serum, DMEM:F12 media supplemented with 2mM glutamine and antibiotics at 5% CO2/37ºC. Once confluent, the cells were re-plated into conditions favourable for NPC growth (serum free Neurobasal medium supplemented with N2, 2mM GlutaMAX® and antibiotics or commercially available STEMPRO® medium (Invitrogen)) in either adherent monolayer cultures or non-adherent surfaces for the formation of spheres. When cells from the MTG were cultured in 10% serum, the dominating cell type that arose after prolonged culture periods were fibroblast-like cells (FbCs), which were highly proliferative and expressed high levels of fibroblast markers. However, when cultured under NPC conditions, FbCs became bipolar in morphology and strongly expressed genes associated with NPCs such as nestin, GFAP and GFAP-δ and βIII-tubulin. These expression patterns partially resembled those seen with adherent adult human NPCs isolated from the SVZ. Furthermore, when FbCs were cultured on non-adhesive surfaces, they formed spherical structures resembling neurospheres formed from adult human SVZ-derived NPCs. When these FbC-spheres were plated onto adhesive surfaces they gave rise to cells expressing immature neuronal markers. Although further investigation is needed, these results suggest that more than one cell type from the adult human brain in vitro possesses stem cell-like properties. The origin of these FbCs is yet to be determined, however, leptomeningeal or blood-born mesenchymal precursor (fibrocytes) origin cannot be excluded. Regardless of their origin, these cells provide further evidence for cellular plasticity and possibly provide an alternative in vitro source of adult neural stem cells.

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  • Aged Residential Care Health Utilisation Study (ARCHUS). A randomised controlled trial to reduce acute hospitalisations from residential aged care.

    Broad, J.B; Foster, Susan; Boyd, M.; Kerse, N.; Lumley, T.; Connolly, M.J. (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background and Aim Our aim is to reduce avoidable acute hospitalisations of residents of long-term care facilities. Such hospitalisations can cause distress, disruption, and complications for residents. Some conditions have been identified as better managed in the facility providing supports are in place. A randomised controlled trial is underway in Auckland, New Zealand of a targeted, multi-disciplinary team (MDT) to up-skill facility staff. We here outline the study design. Design Clustered randomised controlled trial (~1400 residents) of long-term care facilities, stratified by district health board (DHB). Randomisation and interventions commenced March 2011. Facilities certified for long-term care of older people in greater Auckland are eligible for selection if they have high levels of avoidable hospitalisation. Intervention MDTs supporting facility staff to provide evidence-based care. The supports and services provided comprise an initial stock-take assessment and development of facility plan, direct access to a geriatrician and gerontology nurse specialist (GNS), MDT meetings for individual cases, and provision of targeted education to facility nurses/caregivers, facilitated by a GNS. Education topics are based on modelling of risk factors for avoidable hospitalisation from long-term care in Auckland (2008-2010) and include recognition of illness, wound care, care planning, end-stage dementia care, nutrition/dehydration, family communication, specific clinical coaching with high-risk residents, role modelling of clinical reasoning processes, and provision of benchmarking systems. Control Usual care: the quality assurance, supports, and services routinely provided by the DHB Endpoints Primary endpoints include rate of hospitalisations in which the admission diagnosis code is one of a set pre-identified as being potentially avoidable (“Ambulatory Sensitive Hospitalisations”), emergency admission hospital bed days, and all-cause mortality. Secondary endpoints include number of emergency department presentations and number and type of medications prescribed. Residents’ outcomes will be tracked for 12 months from randomisation using their unique national health identifiers (NHIs).

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  • The student nurse integrated team model:barriers and benefits

    Aspinall, Cathleen; Baker, H; Vallant, S; Spence, D (2010-11-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The student nurse integrated team model:barriers and benefits Intent. The purpose of this research was to evaluate a collaborative project to implement an integrated team model of learning in practice with the clinical placement provider for second year Bachelor of Nursing students from the University of Auckland and Auckland University of Technology. Description. Our clinical partner put forward a proposal to change the model of working with undergraduate student nurses in the clinical environment .The aim was to improve the student’s integration into nursing teams and also strengthen their model of team nursing. The World Health Organisation (WHO 2009) identified that the role individuals play within a team influences team effectiveness and therefore impacts on the quality of patient safety. From a University perspective this involved changing the role of the academic lecturer from working alongside the student to supporting the registered nurses. In their role as mentors, the nurses would assist with the integration of theory into practice and teach clinical skills at the bedside. A perceived benefit would be the emersion of second year student nurses into the ward team. The student nurse integrated team model was devised based on a mentorship concept and piloted in the medical and surgical areas of the public hospital. This study evaluated the model from both the University and the ADHB perspective using a mixed methodology.The University of Auckland surveyed students, university lecturers, charge nurses, staff nurse mentors and clinical nurse educators.The Auckland University of Technology held focus groups with the same participants. It was anticipated that this method would provide hard data for evaluation and qualitative information to explore the experience. The introduction of a new way of working in reality meant a change of role for university and clinical staff. Furthermore, the success of the project as with any change initiative, was dependent on a number of stakeholders. Evaluation Both qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the evaluation of this new way of working, the process and results will be shared at the conference. Bibliography includes but not limited to the following: Flin, R. Winter, J. Sarac, and C. & Raduma, M. (2009) .Human factors in patient safety: Review of tools and topics. Geneva: World Health Organization.

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  • Molecular mechanisms of human T cell differentiation - a role for DNA methylation

    Sheppard, Hilary; Brooks, Anna; Dunbar, PR (2009-09-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The differentiation state of CD8+ T cells is an important determinant of their ability to eradicate tumours and infection; progressive differentiation appears to lead to a decreased upregulated suggesting an indirect mechanism underlie T cell differentiation. Several key cell surface markers are down regulated as differentiation progresses see Fig. 1). We have found that promoter DNA methylation is one mechanism involved in the down regulation of these genes This suggests that manipulation of DNA methylation of key genes could be used to improve the survival and function of CD8+ T cells.

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