266 results for Conference poster

  • Characterisation of the Genetic Controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, KR; Plummer, K; Beveridge, CA; Snowden, KC (2005-10-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Branching is a fundamental process affecting plant form and is a source of much of the wide variety of plant architecture seen in nature. Our aim is to understand the function of genes involved in branching using petunia as a model system. This research involves the study of the decreased apical dominance (dad) mutants in petunia, which have increased basal branching compared with wild type. It also involves the investigation of genes known to affect branching in other plant species to discover their effects in petunia. One of these genes, MAX2, was identified from an increased branching mutant in Arabidopsis, and its effects in petunia are being investigated by misexpression of the petunia orthologue. Previous grafting experiments using the dad mutants in petunia have shown that a graft-transmissible signal is involved in causing the increased branching phenotype. Hormones are graft-transmissible chemicals and variation in their levels play important roles in the control of apical dominance, one of the most studied controls in lateral branching. Auxin and cytokinin levels in dad mutant and wild type plants were investigated, but the levels of these hormones were not consistent with them being the graft-transmissible signal modified by the DAD genes. In order to investigate the relationships between the DAD genes, the branching phenotypes of the single and double dad mutants were characterised and analysed. Grafting experiments to investigate the interactions between the DAD genes in controlling the branching signal were also undertaken. This work has revealed interactions between the DAD genes and provided evidence for the order of action of these genes.

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  • Synthesis and mechanistic studies of PLA₂ inihibition by the marine alkaloid hyrtiosulawesine

    Liew, Lydia; Bourguet-Kondracki, M-L; Copp, Brent (2010-10-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The first isolation of hyrtiosulawesine (1) was from an Indonesian collection of the marine sponges Hyrtios erectus and H. reticulatus.1 The β-carboline alkaloid was subsequently re-isolated from a Red Sea collection of Hyrtios sp. and found to display anti-phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity with an IC50 value of 14 μM. Phospholipase A2 catalyses the hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids at the sn-2 position to generate arachidonic acids (AA).3,4 AA are precursors to a large family of compounds known as the eicosanoids associated with inflammatory reactions.4 PLA2 inhibition by hyrtiosulawesine would lead to a decrease in AA and proinflammatory eicosanoids, with anti-inflammatory effect.4 In an effort to understand the structural attributes of the natural product (1) that cause PLA2 inhibition, hyrtiosulawesine and a series of related model compounds (2, 3) will be synthesised and evaluated for biological activity. Biomimetic nucleophiles will be used to probe hyrtiosulawesine and related compounds in order to determine their reactivity and possible site of reaction. Bioactive members of the library of compounds will subsequently be subjected to reaction with bee venom phospholipase A2 to identify the presence of any covalent adducts. Further studies may be directed to discovering the nature and location of the covalent linkage within the enzyme active site. The latest results will be presented. References 1. Salmoun, M.; Devijver, C.; Daloze, D.; Braekman, J.-C.; Van Soest, R. W. M. J. Nat. Prod. 2002, 65, 1173-1176. 2. Sauleau, P.; Martin, M.-T.; Dau, M.-E. T. H.; Youssef, D. T. A.; Bourguet-Kondracki, M.-L. J. Nat. Prod. 2006, 69, 1676-1679. 3. Balsinde, J.; Balboa, M. A.; Insel, P. A.; Dennis, E. A. Annu. Rev. Pharmacol. Toxicol. 1999, 39, 175-189. 4. Parente, L. J. Rheumatol. 2001, 28, 2375-2382.

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  • fMRI Measures of the Dorsal Visual Cortex Correlates with Behavioral Performance and Cortical Thickness

    Poppe, Tanya; Leung, Myra; Tottman, Anna; Harding, Jane; Bloomfield, Francis; Alsweiler, Jane; Thompson, Benjamin (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Kai Time in ECE Survey

    Gerritsen, Sarah; Morton, Susan; Wall, C (2014-06-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Kai Time in ECE is a one-off online survey collecting information about nutrition and physical activity practices and policies for 3-4 year olds in licensed Early Childhood Education (ECE) services in Auckland, Counties Manukau and Waikato. The survey results will be used in PhD research on the influence of childcare on preschool dietary patterns and body size.

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  • Reverse Mentoring: Benefits and Barriers

    Ross, M; Dunham, Annette (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Current research suggests that the modern workforce is comprised of a substantial proportion of ageing employees, in addition to an influx of young, first-time workers. This diverse and multigenerational workforce provides organisations an interesting challenge, in retaining engaged and productive employees, and ensuring relevant training and development. One specific management practice is reverse mentoring. Reverse mentoring is a unique form of mentoring, whereby the traditional roles of mentor and mentee are reversed. It involves a junior employee (in age/status) mentoring a senior employee. The junior employee is able to share their recent generational learnings and perspective with a senior organisational member, who gains insight into recent trends and technologies. Whilst there appear to be many benefits from this relationship, including increased communication and understanding; leadership development; and upskilling in relevant trends, there may also be some barriers to the success of the relationship. Barriers may include a resistance to the shift in power hierarchy and challenges with changing the traditional learning pedagogy of older teacher and younger learner. Aim: Reverse mentoring is a reasonably modern concept, and as such, empirical research on this practice is relatively new. This research aims to explore any benefits and barriers experienced in a reverse mentoring relationship. Method: Participants in this study will be recruited from a Melbourne hospital, who currently run a formal reverse mentoring relationship program. Approximately 16 individuals (8 mentors and 8 mentees), will be invited to participate. The proposed study uses a qualitative method of data collection, through semi-structured interviews. Interviews will be recorded, and responses will be transcribed, with thematic analysis used to identify common themes. Thematic analysis allows the common themes and experiences of mentors and mentees, to tell an overall story of the data. Conclusion: The proposed study’s findings contribute to a currently small base of research on reverse mentoring. It is hoped that the research will help (i) inform future quantitative research on reverse mentoring and (ii) inform organisational strategies that will help employees engage in reverse mentoring relationships in ways that effectively support their training and development.

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  • Paternal depression during pregnancy and after childbirth: evidence from Growing Up in New Zealand

    Underwood, Lisa; Atatoa Carr, P; Berry, S; Grant, Cameron; Peterson, Elizabeth; Waldie, Karen; Morton, Susan (2016-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: There is little evidence on depression among men whose partners are pregnant or have recently given birth. Methods: An ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of 3528 men living in New Zealand completed interviews during their partner's pregnancy and nine months after the birth of their child. Depression symptoms were measured using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) and the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Rates of depression (defined as EPDS>12 and PHQ-9>9) and associations with a range of paternal and maternal characteristics were explored using logistic regression. Results: Antenatal paternal depression, which affected 2.3% of fathers, was associated with paternal perceived stress (OR=1.4, 95%CI 1.3 to 1.5) and fair to poor paternal health (OR=2, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.5) during their partner's pregnancy. Postnatal paternal depression affected 4.3% of fathers and was associated with paternal perceived stress in pregnancy (OR=1.12, 95%CI 1.1 to 1.2), relationship status at nine months after childbirth (OR=5.6, 95%CI 2 to 15.7), fair to poor paternal health at nine months (OR=3.3, 95%CI 2 to 5.1), employment status at nine months (OR=1.8, 95%CI 1.1 to 3.1) and a past history of depression (OR=2.8, 95%CI 1.7 to 4.7). Conclusions: Expectant fathers are at risk of depression if they feel stressed or are in poor health. In this study, rates of depression were higher during the postpartum period and were associated with adverse social and relationship factors. Identifying who is most at-risk of paternal depression and when will help inform interventions to help men and their families.

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  • Variability in soil CO2 efflux across distinct urban land cover types

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2015-04-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    As a main source of greenhouse gases urban areas play an important role in the global carbon cycle. To assess the potential role of urban vegetation in mitigating carbon emissions we need information on the magnitude of biogenic CO2 emissions and its driving factors. We examined how urban land use types (urban forest, parklands, sportsfields) vary in their soil CO2 efflux.We measured soil CO2 efflux and its isotopic signature, soil temperature and soil moisture over a complete growing season in Auckland, New Zealand. Soil physical and chemical properties and vegetation characteristics were also measured. Mean soil CO2 efflux ranged from 4.15 to 12 molm 2 s 1.We did not find significant differences in soil CO2 efflux among land cover types due to high spatial variability in soil CO2 efflux among plots. Soil (soil carbon and nitrogen density, texture, soil carbon:nitrogen ratio) and vegetation characteristics (basal area, litter carbon density, grass biomass) were not significantly correlated with soil CO2 efflux. We found a distinct seasonal pattern with significantly higher soil CO2 efflux in autumn (Apr/May) and spring (Oct). In urban forests and sportsfields over 80% of the temporal variation was explained by soil temperature and soil water content. The 13C signature of CO2 respired from parklands and sportsfields (-20 permil - -25 permil) were more positive compared to forest plots (-29 permil) indicating that parkland and sportsfields had a considerable proportion of C4 grasses. Despite the large intra-urban variability, our results compare to values reported from other, often climatically different cities, supporting the hypothesis of homogenization across urban areas as a result of human management practices.

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  • CO2 Fluxes and Concentrations in a Residential Area in the Southern Hemisphere

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Turnbull, JC; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2014-12-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    While cities are generally major sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, recent research has shown that parts of urban areas may also act as CO2 sinks due to CO2 uptake by vegetation. However, currently available results are related to a large degree of uncertainty due to the limitations of the applied methods and the limited number of studies available from urban areas, particularly from the southern hemisphere. In this study, we explore the potential of eddy covariance and tracer measurements (13C and 14C isotopes of CO2) to quantify and partition CO2 fluxes and concentrations in a residential urban area in Auckland, New Zealand. Based on preliminary results from autumn and winter (March to July 2014) the residential area is a small source of CO2 (0.11 mol CO2 m-2 day-1). CO2 fluxes and concentrations follow a distinct diurnal cycle with a morning peak between 7:00 and 9:00 (max: 0.25 mol CO2 m-2 day-1/412 ppm) and midday low with negative CO2 fluxes (min: -0.17 mol CO2 m-2 day-1/392 ppm) between 10:00 and 15:00 local time, likely due to photosynthetic CO2 uptake by local vegetation. Soil CO2 efflux may explain that CO2 concentrations increase and remain high (401 ppm) throughout the night. Mean diurnal winter delta13C values are in anti-phase with CO2 concentrations and vary between -9.0 - -9.70/00. The depletion of delta13C compared to clean atmospheric air (-8.20/00) is likely a result of local CO2 sources dominated by gasoline combustion (appr. 60%) during daytime. A sector analysis (based on prevailing wind) of CO2 fluxes and concentrations indicates lower CO2 fluxes and concentrations from the vegetation-dominated sector, further demonstrating the influence of vegetation on local CO2 concentrations. These results provide an insight into the temporal and spatial variability CO2 fluxes/concentrations and potential CO2 sinks and sources from a city in the southern hemisphere and add valuable information to the global database of urban CO2 fluxes.

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  • Pride and Prejudice: Social Workers’ Experiences of the Profession

    Staniforth, Barbara; Beddoe, Elizabeth (2016-06-28)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Development of an organisational memory scale

    Dunham, Annette (2007-12-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In many countries, people are retiring earlier than ever before and the retirement of the baby boom generation over the next two decades further intensifies the impact of this trend. Accompanying this development, are fears about the potential loss of organisational knowledge or memory which may equate to the loss of the organisation’s competitive advantage. Organisations, while recognizing that older workers often possess valuable “organisational memory” seem to also assume these same workers will readily divest themselves of their knowledge. Encouraging experienced workers to act as a mentor to younger or less experienced workers, is often mentioned in the management and related literature as a way of capturing and retaining valuable organisational knowledge. However, employees (including older workers) in the possession of considerable organisational memory, may, or may not be willing to divulge their knowledge to others, for a number of reasons. This poster presents initial results from the first of a series of studies designed to examine the relationship between organisational memory in the individual and propensity to mentor. It outlines the development and exploratory factor analysis of an “Organisational Memory” scale that taps the individual’s own resources in terms of organisational knowledge and expertise. Subsequent studies in the proposed research aim to help organisations more effectively target potential mentors for the purposes of retaining organisational knowledge, while also identifying the relevant costs and benefits of mentoring perceived by those individuals. By doing so it is hoped organisations will have a clearer understanding of how they can minimize costs while emphasising the benefits of such a relationship for the potential mentor. In contrast to the “development outcomes” focus of much of the mentoring literature, these studies give attention to the “knowledge sharing role of mentoring, while also touching on developmental outcomes, in this case, for the mentor

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  • Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma - aiming for zero recurrence

    Doyle, Anthony; Graydon, A; French, JG; Hanlon, M (2016-04-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over a 13 year period, a single radiologist (AJD) performed radiofrequency ablation (RFA)of osteoid osteoma in 32 patients. The lesions were located mostly in the lower extremities (femur N=15, tibia N=9) and spine (N=5). Lesion size varied from 4 to 18 mm, average 10 mm. Patient age ranged from 5 to 23 years, average 14 years. All but two had RFA as their primary treatment, with two treated after surgical excision had resulted in recurrence. CT guidance was used for all procedures, performed under general anaesthetic. A variety of different radiofrequency generators and probes were used. No complications occurred. None of the patients showed any signs of recurrence and none required further intervention. Although the followup period varied (and a few patients were lost to followup after a few weeks), most of the patients were followed for at least 12 months post procedure, with maximum followup seven years. We conclude that, with careful technique, the recurrence rate for RFA of osteoid osteoma can approach zero. Details of technique are discussed in the poster itself.

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  • The potential of urban forests to mitigate atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The urban population in New Zealand is expected to increase significantly over the next years. Urban areas are generally large sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However, attempts to quantify atmospheric CO2 concentrations and fluxes have suggested that densily vegetated urban areas may absorb sufficient quantities of anthropogenic CO2 to act as a local sink. Consequently, urban greening programs now form an important part of many urban climate change mitigation policies globally as well as in New Zealand. However, knowledge about the direct contribution of urban vegetation on atmospheric CO2 concentrations is still limited and measurements scarce. This paper examines the methods used to date to estimate / measure carbon pools and CO2 fluxes from urban vegetation and soils (collectively known as urban forests) and aggregates currently available results. Results from the northern hemisphere show that carbon pools in urban forests were comparable to 3 – 60% of the annually released fossil fuel emissions, while photosynthetic uptake accounted for 0.3 – 2.6% of the total estimated emissions in urban areas. Whilst vegetation did not offset CO2 emissions on an annual basis in these scenarios, vegetative CO2 uptake resulted in significantly lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations in summer. However, the currently available results are related to a large degree of uncertainty due to the limitations of the applied methods, the limited number of urban areas studied and the temporal / spatial resolution of the fieldwork. This paper demonstrates that in order to effectively quantify and encorporate carbon fluxes from urban areas into annual CO2 budgets, future research needs to use a combination of methodologies and be aware of the scales of their studies. Thus, before investing in urban greening programs the potential of urban vegetation as a climate change mitigation measure needs to be further investigated, particularly for cities in the southern hemisphere.

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  • Baby, Baby: Pregnant Again After Postnatal Depression

    Cowie, Susan (2008-09-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Depression following birth has wide ranging impacts on the woman, her new baby and her family. Studies indicate that treatment has been effective in shortening the duration of depression but does not prevent the increased risk of experiencing depression following another birth. This study explores in detail women’s and practitioners understandings of first time mother’s experiences of and recovery from depression and then focus on how the women prepare for and make sense of the experience of second time pregnancy and motherhood. It is hoped to develop strategies to reduce recurrence and impact of depression in women with young children. Results are presented of interviews with 25 women who had previously experienced post natal depression. Interviews were conducted 3-6 months before birth, focusing firstly on how the women make sense of their transition to first time motherhood and coping with/recovery from depression and secondly, on their expectations of second time birth and motherhood. The second interview, completed 3 months after birth, focused on their experience of the pregnancy, birth, and life with another child. Qualitative methodologies were employed. Of particular interest were the things that women described as helpful and unhelpful, their understanding of the help/treatment (e.g. Home help, CBT, support group, Arapax) they had gained and how this influenced their decisions and coping second time round. Preliminary analyses, particularly of time one data (collection complete), are reported and issues related to the study design and implementation are discussed.

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  • The effect of aspirin and smoking on excretion of lactulose and mannitol in fit young women: Towards an aspirin augmented test of gut permeability

    Sequeira, Ivana; Lentle, RG; Kruger, MC; Hurst, RD (2012-07-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Arabic emphatics are uvularized

    Al-Tairi, Hamed; Brown, Jason; Watson, Catherine; Gick, B (2016-10-21)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Evaluation of liquefaction susceptibility using the critical state soil mechanics concept

    Orense, Rolando; Tan, Wei Yoong (2016-04-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Persistent radial glial cells in the adult human and sheep SVZ differentially express Fatty Acid Binding proteins (FABPs)

    Dieriks, Birger; Dean, JM; Faull, Richard; Curtis, Maurice (2014-07-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Insulin and IGF1 modulate PSA-NCAM turnover in a process involving specific extracellular matrix components

    Monzo, HJ; Park, TIH; Dieriks, Birger; Jansson, D; Dragunow, Michael; Curtis, Maurice (2014-07-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • LiDAR and EM conductivity investigation of a Holocene coastal landslide complex: Pourewa Landslide Zone, Auckland, New Zealand

    Liu, S; Brook, Martin; Richards, NP; Bevan, D; Prebble, W (2016-12-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Rapid mapping of a Holocene coastal landslide using Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry: Ohuka Landslide, Port Waikato, New Zealand

    Bevan, D; Brook, MS; Tunnicliffe, Jon; Prebble, W (2016-12-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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