280 results for Conference poster

  • Talking Allowed!

    Davies, Maree; Sinclair, A (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Research on the Paideia Method (a method for discussing a topic) was conducted in 20 classrooms across five schools, of varying socioeconomic environments (ages 11-13) in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2010. The researchers sought to further examine the results from their pilot study of the Paideia Seminar, entitled 'Talking Allowed: I like it when the teacher lets us talk without telling us what to say', trialed in 2008 (Sinclair & Davies, 2011). In addition, in order to provide the optimum conditions to prepare the students for the face-to-face seminars, an online component (open source software) was added as an alternative medium to assist students in their preparation. The research questions were: What happens to the Nature of Interaction, and the Complexity of the Discussion when students participate in a Paideia Seminar, and an on-line discussion in preparation for the face-to-face seminar? What is the optimal role of the teacher when participating in a Paideia Seminar and an on-line discussion to increase complexity of discussion?

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  • Using network science to explore innovation

    O'Neale, DR; Hendy, SH (2013-06-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    We live in a world were scientific and technical advances require increasingly specialised knowledge while drawing expertise from ever more diverse technical areas. In an effort to better understand the relationships between different areas of innovation, and the role of specialisation, diversity and ubiquity in national and regional economies, we have mined several million patent records from the European Patent Office, along with their classification codes, and used them to construct a network of ???patent-space???. Patents provide a rich data set when studying innovation. Networks of scientific publications, such as that in [1], formed from inter-journal citations, illustrate the links between different disciplines as new knowledge is created, while networks of countries and the goods they export, such as the ???product-space??? network in [2], give insight into the economic complexity (or otherwise) and the likely areas of growth for national economies. Using patents allows us to take an intermediate view and investigate the role of science and innovation in economic growth. We take an approach similar to [2], identifying when individual countries or geographic regions have a ???revealed comparative advantage??? with respect to particular technical areas. We have constructed a proximity network as a base-map for the space of patentable innovation. We find that patent-space is heterogeneous and highly structured, and that the structure depends on the size or ???granularity??? of the regions that data is aggregated into. By overlaying data for particular regions on the patent-space base map we are able to explore temporal and regional trends ??? in particular how the innovation systems of different countries has produced quite different areas of specialisation. Figure 1: Patent-space for New Zealand (left) and South Korea (right) - two countries with very different innovation systems. Nodes represent patent classification classes. Nodes are dark when the country has a comparative advantage in that area and faded out otherwise. Nodes are connected if a comparative advantage with respect to one classification tends to occur in conjunction with a connected classification. [1] L. Leydesdorff & I. Rafols, Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology (2008). [2] C. Hidalgo & R. Hausmann, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2009).

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  • Using torque rheology to characterise cure of bio-based powder coatings

    Draneboisa, CNE; Smith, D; De Silva, Kaluachchi; Taylor, Mark (2016-07-26)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • An Architecture for Flexible Problem Solving

    Langley, Patrick; Emery, Miranda; Barley, Michael; Maclellan, C (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The literature on problem solving in both humans and machines has revealed a diverse set of strategies that operate in different manners. In this paper, we review this great variety of techniques and propose a five-stage framework for problem solving that accounts for this variation in terms of differences in strategic knowledge used at each stage. We describe the framework and its implementation in some detail, including its encoding of problems and their solutions, its representation of domain-level and strategy-level knowledge, and its overall operation. We present evidence of the framework???s generality and its ability to support many distinct problem-solving strategies, including one that is novel and interesting. We also report experiments that show the framework???s potential for empirical comparisons of different techniques. We conclude by reviewing other work on flexible approaches to problem solving and considering some directions for future research.

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  • The spirit that is one's own: A conversation in two tongues, Ko te wairua n?? te tangata ake: He whakawhitiwhiti k??rerorero ki roto i ng?? reo e rua

    Dattaray, D; Keegan, Peter (2016-11-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Indigenous epistemes and philosophies help one understand ethical responsibilities in a changing world, between knowing and learning. Aesthetic, socio-political, cultural and normative aspects of human existence are reflected in Indigenous narrative traditions and language practices. This paper attempts to forge connections between the historical and discursive Indigenous practices of M??ori of New Zealand and Karbis from the North East of India. M??ori are the only indigenous group in New Zealand. M??ori are now highly urbanized, in a largely English speaking and Western dominated context, yet have made important gains in language and cultural revitalization. The North East of India today is a profound paradox that simultaneously represents the frontiers of globalization as well as a heritage of Indigenous traditions and cultures. In present-day India, the ???North East??? often denotes a sense of geographical isolation and is perceived as a region of ethnic strife and violence. North East is also a treasure trove of culture and tradition belonging to hundreds of Indigenous communities from the region. Through an interdisciplinary dialogue, the paper attempts a rethink on issues of public accessibility, intellectual and cultural property rights. Further, it underlines the significance of reciprocal education and training in the context of Indigeneity.

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  • Do you see what I see? - Surveillance and response

    Patel, Reena; Dixon, Robyn; Webster, Craig (2015-07-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: Early warning scoring systems and rapid response teams are important strategies to improve the detection of patient deterioration in hospitals. Initiation of an appropriate response relies on nurses recognising changes in patient condition and alerting the required emergency assistance team. Study Objective: To determine the level of concordance between the nurse???s assessment and that of the emergency team, based on early warning scores (EWS). Methods: An audit of data collected between June 2011 and May 2013 was undertaken and 2780 instances were reviewed in order to determine the degree of concordance on EWS scores between nurses initiating calls and those assigned by the emergency response team. Results: 881 instances lack of concordance was identified. In the majority of instances, the nurse overestimated the severity of the patient???s condition when compared to the emergency response team???s score. Conclusion: Such lack of concordance is problematic given that failure to activate an emergency response when required has obvious implications for patient safety while inappropriate referral to emergency response teams can result in inefficient use of resources.

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  • Visual Acuity, Refractive Status and Accommodation in Octopus Gibbsi

    Tunrbull, P; Backhouse, Simon; Phillips, John (2010-07-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • How do we make a generic social work curriculum disaster???informed?

    Adamson, Carole (2017-05-29)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Globally, the social work qualifying curriculum is a dynamic construction of core subjects reflective of local contexts, responsive to the principles of the IFSW definition (IFSW, 2014). Whilst the urgency of disaster highlights the imperative for determining the nature of the social work role and response, the possibilities of a disaster-informed curriculum are often subsumed within a host of competing demands. How then can we plan for the unpredictable and ensure that a qualifying social work curriculum contains sufficient preparation for graduate capacity in disaster risk reduction (DRR)? Whilst a minority of qualifying programmes contain specific disaster modules, the challenge for much of social work education is to insert sufficient disaster knowledge through linkages to existing curriculum foci. Starting with an overview of skills and knowledge required for DRR, this practical presentation illustrates ways in which a generic social work curriculum can be infiltrated and embedded with disaster-informed knowledge.

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  • Cells isolated from adult human brain. Are they fibroblasts, neural stem cells or both?

    Park, In; Gibbons, Hannah; Mee, EW; Teoh, HH; Faull, Richard; Dragunow, Michael (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The discovery of endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the adult human brain capable of migrating and differentiating in response to external stimuli has re-defined the field of neuroscience. In order to study and characterize these NPCs, research groups have attempted to culture them in vitro with varying success. Adult human NPCs are generally cultured from the two major neurogenic regions of the brain; the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. However, we propose that cells with similar characteristics to NPCs can be isolated and cultured from other regions of the adult human brain. Briefly, human brain cells were isolated from the middle temporal gyrus (MTG) of post-mortem and biopsy tissue and diced into small pieces prior to enzymatic digestion. The dissociated cells were plated onto poly-L-lysine (PLL) coated culture flasks. Initially the cells were maintained in media consisting of 10% serum, DMEM:F12 media supplemented with 2mM glutamine and antibiotics at 5% CO2/37??C. Once confluent, the cells were re-plated into conditions favourable for NPC growth (serum free Neurobasal medium supplemented with N2, 2mM GlutaMAX?? and antibiotics or commercially available STEMPRO?? medium (Invitrogen)) in either adherent monolayer cultures or non-adherent surfaces for the formation of spheres. When cells from the MTG were cultured in 10% serum, the dominating cell type that arose after prolonged culture periods were fibroblast-like cells (FbCs), which were highly proliferative and expressed high levels of fibroblast markers. However, when cultured under NPC conditions, FbCs became bipolar in morphology and strongly expressed genes associated with NPCs such as nestin, GFAP and GFAP-?? and ??III-tubulin. These expression patterns partially resembled those seen with adherent adult human NPCs isolated from the SVZ. Furthermore, when FbCs were cultured on non-adhesive surfaces, they formed spherical structures resembling neurospheres formed from adult human SVZ-derived NPCs. When these FbC-spheres were plated onto adhesive surfaces they gave rise to cells expressing immature neuronal markers. Although further investigation is needed, these results suggest that more than one cell type from the adult human brain in vitro possesses stem cell-like properties. The origin of these FbCs is yet to be determined, however, leptomeningeal or blood-born mesenchymal precursor (fibrocytes) origin cannot be excluded. Regardless of their origin, these cells provide further evidence for cellular plasticity and possibly provide an alternative in vitro source of adult neural stem cells.

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  • The use of whole community bacterial indicators to monitor ecological health, function and variability within stream biofilms

    Lear, Gavin; Boothroyd, IK; Lewis, Gillian (2009-08-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study describes the extent of variability in biofilm bacterial community structure across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales and assesses whether this may be used as an indicator of stream ecological health and function. A community DNA fingerprinting technique (Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis - ARISA) was used to examine the structure of bacterial communities within freshwater stream biofilms. When compared with macrobenthic invertebrate community assemblages using multi-dimensional scaling techniques, similar broad-scale trends in population structure were revealed between organisms at these different trophic levels. For both communities, spatial variability in community structure was greater between streams than within each site, or compared to temporal variability measured over 1 year. Distance-based redundancy analysis of both bacterial ARISA and macroinvertebrate data estimated that the largest cause of variation in community structure was due to differences in catchment land-use, rather than any single water quality parameter (e.g. ph or ammoniacal nitrogen). Multidimensional scaling of ARISA data also revealed significant differences in community structure between urban, and less impacted stream sites, providing evidence that whole-bacterial communities could be used as an indicator of freshwater ecological health, analogous to the way that macroinvertebrate communities have been used for many years. In conclusion, we propose the analysis of whole bacterial communities as a cost-effective, high throughput alternative indicator of freshwater ecological health.

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  • Human Adenovirus ecology in environmental waters in New Zealand

    Dong, Yimin; Lewis, Gillian (2008-08-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A major New Zealand study of pathogen occurrence in surface freshwaters identified occurrence of human adenovirus in 30% of sites and samples by qualitative PCR based methods. The source or nature of these viruses was not clear from the study and raises important questions in both viral ecology and human health protection. The aim of this study was to begin to unravel these questions by (i) development of specific quantitative analysis methods for adenoviruses in water and (ii) to target identifiable groups of adenovirus associated with human respiratory or gastrointestinal infections. These quantitative group specific real time PCR methods were tested in drinking water, recreational water, river water and wastewater. Adenovirus was detected in all primary wastewater samples tested (n=10) at high genome copy number (1.87 x104 to 4.6 x106 per litre) and in 33% (n=15) of the river water and 11% (n=27) of the treated drinking water samples. In addition, adenovirus was detected in 5 of the 6 estuarine recreational water samples (17 to 1190 virus genome copies per litre). DNA sequence analysis suggested that human adenovirus group C (respiratory infection associated) were most commonly associated with river, recreational and drinking water. Group F adenovirus (gastroenteritis associated viruses) were found to dominate in most wastewater (5 - 100 % total adenovirus) but were not detected in surface waters. This study suggests that the ecology of specific groups or types of adenovirus is sufficiently different, external to the host, to have important implications for human health risk assessment.

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  • Effect of light regimes on the utilisation of an exogenous carbon source by freshwater biofilm communities

    Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian (2007-06-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Biofilms are a major source of ???in stream??? primary production, exhibiting high population density, and being an important source of carbon for microbial heterotrophs. Changing patterns of land-use within freshwater catchment areas may greatly impact on stream biofilm microbial community structure, which in turn may influence the speed and extent with which full ecosystem recovery may occur. This study reports how freshwater biofilm communities respond to additions of acetate, used as a proxy for organic matter, the primary source of carbon within shaded forests and headwater streams. The use of [ 13C] acetate and subsequent isolation of 13C-labelled nucleic acids from the metabolically active fraction of the bacterial community enabled substrate assimilating organisms to be identified. In addition, biofilms were exposed to varied levels of incident light to assess the relative contribution of phototrophic and heterotrophic nutrition.

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  • Ecosystem responses to multiple-stressor gradients: Nutrient and sediment addition to experimental stream channels

    Wagenhoff, A; Matthaei, CD; Lear, Gavin; Lewis, Gillian; Townsend, CR (2009-05-16)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Agricultural land use can strongly affect stream ecosystems by increasing levels of nutrients and fine sediment cover on the streambed. Knowledge of patterns in ecological responses along gradients of these two stressors will help define thresholds of harm. Leaf breakdown rates, algal and bacterial communities are directly and/or indirectly influenced by nutrient supply and fine sediment cover. To investigate the effects of stressor gradients and their interactions on these biological response parameters, we designed a full-factorial experiment in circular stream-side channels with eight levels each of nutrients (36 to 6900 ??g??l-1 DIN, 1.4 to 450 ??g??l-1 DRP) and fine sediment (0 to 100 % cover). Algal biomass, bacterial diversity and leaf pack decomposition were determined after three weeks of exposure to both stressors. Algal biomass was significantly higher in channels with lower levels of fine sediment. Bacterial diversity generally increased with increasing nutrient concentrations up to an intermediate nutrient level but then decreased again with the exception of reaching the highest diversity overall at the top nutrient level. Thus, increased levels of nutrients and fine sediment caused major changes to the algal and bacterial communities. In turn, these changes affect other food-web components as well as ecosystem functioning, including decomposition.

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  • Delayed Cerebral Post-arteriole Dilation is Consistent with Observations at Multiple Spatial and Temporal Scales: Evidence from Mathematical Modelling

    Barrett, MJP; Tawhai, MH; Suresh, Vinod (2011-05-25)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background and aims: Observations from different neurovascular imaging modalities provide conflicting evidence about the presence and/or extent of volume changes in post-arteriole blood vessels. At the level of individual vessels, two-photon imaging during functional activation shows a rapid increase in arteriolar diameter, but little or no increase in capillaries or venules 1 . In contrast, 'bulk' measurements of flow-volume relationships show large increases in arterial volume 2 , and smaller - but still significant - increases in venous volume 3 . Here, we reconcile these competing observations using a dynamic, biophysically based mathematical model of the hemodynamic response. Methods: We use the widely known Windkessel model that represents blood flow as analogous to electrical current, and networks of blood vessels as analogous to electrical resistances and capacitances. The model also includes a novel description of vascular compliance, viscoelastic effects, and stimulus-driven vasodilation. Experimental observations at progressively more detailed scales are used to constrain and validate the model, following a 'top down' approach. In addition, we test the assumption that post-arteriole vessels do not dilate, and use the model to predict observations at progressively more aggregated scales, following a 'bottom up' approach. Results: Model predictions of the total, arterial, and venous steady state flow-volume relationships agree well with experimental observations, as do predictions of transient changes in flow and volume during functional activation. The model also predicts rapid arteriole dilation during activation. Interestingly, this is accompanied by slow increases in capillary and venule diameter that - for brief stimulation - are near indistinguishable from baseline noise. When assuming no dilation of capillaries or venules, there are only minor differences between the model predictions at the single vessel scale. However, predictions at more aggregated scales are qualitatively and quantitatively different from experimental observations. Conclusions: The model presented here is able to reproduce the main features of experimental observations over a range of spatial and temporal scales. These results suggest that arterial dilation represents the majority of regional cerebral blood volume increases during functional activation, especially during brief stimulation. However, passive dilation in capillaries and venules may be increasingly significant during extended stimulation. This is an important consideration when interpreting or comparing results from neurovascular imaging modalities, such as optical methods and magnetic resonance imaging.

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  • Practice-led curricula: driving from the front or rear seat?

    Adamson, Carole (2009-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Do knowledge-driven or practice-led models best serve the needs of social work practitioners engagin

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  • Effect of contact lens induced retinal defocus on the thickness of the human choroid

    Chiang, Samuel; Backhouse, S; Phillips, John (2014-04-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to describe the amplitude and time-course of choroidal thickness changes induced by imposed hyperopic and myopic retinal defocus and to compare the responses in emmetropic and myopic subjects. METHODS Twelve Asian subjects (6 emmetropes and 6 myopes) aged between 18 and 34 years had OCT images of the choroid taken in both eyes at 5 min intervals while exposed to monocular defocus (random right or left eye) for 60 min; the fellow eye was kept optimally corrected (no defocus). Two different monocular defocus conditions (2 D hyperopic or 2 D myopic defocus) were tested on separate occasions. Thickness changes were measured as absolute changes in microns. RESULTS Prior to applying defocus, mean choroidal thickness in myopic eyes (mean ?? SD, 256.30??m ?? 41.24??m) was significantly less than in emmetropic eyes (mean ?? SD, 423.09??m ?? 60.69??m) (p<0.05) in 60 minutes. No significant difference was found between emmetropes and myopes in changes of choroidal thickness with the two types of defocus. CONCLUSIONS Small but significant choroidal thickness changes occurred when human eyes were exposed to both myopic and hyperopic monocular defocus. In each case these changes acted to move the retina towards the altered image plane, so as to reduce the degree of defocus. In this small sample we could detect no difference in responses of myopic eyes compared to emmetropic eyes.

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  • CUTE: CUTting Edge Diamond Optimization

    Downward, Anthony; Zakeri, G (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Centenary Diamond, weighing 55g, was estimated to be worth $100 million when it was unveiled in 1991. This diamond was cut from a rough-stone weighing 120g; thus when cutting such a stone, it is imperative to orient the stone such that waste is minimized. Our interactive software allows a user to maximize the value of a diamond from a given rough-stone. As the user alters the orientation of the diamond, it solves optimization problems to scale and position the diamond within the rough-stone.

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  • Engaging citizenship; formations of professionalism in social development practice - Doctoral Study

    Harington, Philip (2009-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    As an occupational identity emerges, how are critical elements of professionalism resolved in practice?

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  • Coupled mechanics and airflow of a human lung

    Hedges, KL; Hunter, PJ; Tawhai, MH (2006)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    To study the ventilation distribution within a human lung a model has been produced that couples soft tissue mechanics and a simplified airflow solution.

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  • The skeletal effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib

    O'Sullivan, Susannah; Lin, Jian; Watson, M; Callon, K; Tong, PC; Naot, Dorit; Horne, Anne; Aati, O; Porteous, F; Gamble, G; Cornish, Jillian; Browett, Peter; Grey, Andrew (2011-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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