277 results for Conference poster

  • Molecular basis for binding and subtype selectivity of 1,4-benzodiazepine antagonist ligands of the cholecystokinin receptor

    Cawston, Erin; Sexton, PM; Miller, LJ (2011-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Allosteric intramembranous binding pockets in peptide-binding GPCRs create opportunities to develop novel small molecule drugs with substantial benefit over orthosteric-acting drugs. To gain insights into the molecular determinants of the allosteric binding pocket within cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors, we prepared and characterized a series of receptor constructs in which residues proposed to line this pocket that are distinct in each receptor were reversed (chimeric constructs). Two novel ligands were studied, representing 1,4-benzodiazepine antagonists that differ only in the stereochemistry (S or R) of the 3-position side chain, while exhibiting binding selectivity for either CCK1R or CCK2R, respectively. Radioiodinated 1,4-benzodiazepine ligands were used as tracers in the binding assays. Six mutations within four transmembrane segments of CCK1R and CCK2R were studied. When all six residues were mutated in CCK1R to the corresponding residues in CCK2R, the selectivity of this receptor was completely reversed, yet its peptide-binding selectivity was unaffected. To further investigate which regions may be responsible for this change in selectivity, mutagenesis of the residues within individual transmembrane segments within CCK1R and CCK2R was performed and resulted in minimal impact in binding to the iodinated 1,4-benzodiazepines. Therefore, combining the residue changes within two or three segments were also prepared and studied. This detailed mutational analysis provides important information on the benzodiazepine allosteric binding site present within the CCK receptors and provides insight into ligand-receptor interactions that may be important in selectivity of this allosteric binding pocket within CCK receptors.

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  • In vivo and in vitro assessment of the action of the antitumour benzonaphthyridine derivative SN 28049 on the murine Colon 38

    Chen, Ying; Finlay, GJ; Richardson, E; Baguley, BC (2010-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    SN 28049 a new DNA binding benzonaphthyridine derivative targeting the topoisomerase II enzyme is curative against the murine Co38 adenocarcinoma, whereas another agent targeting the same enzyme, etoposide, is relatively ineffective against this tumour.

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  • High throughput methods for the investigation of the human microbiome

    Lau, Kelvin; Berg, A; Ketley, J; Barer, M (2011-03-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Microorganisms can colonise many sites within the human host, including the skin, gastrointestinal tracts, oronasopharyngeal cavity and urogenital tract. Comprehensive studies of the human microbiome often need to encompass a large number of samples as a consequence of the variety of distinct sites that are colonised, and the significant variation in microbiota that can exist between individuals. For large sample sets, the cost of sequencing and the bioinformatics resources required to process sequence data can be prohibitive, and become limiting factors for the depth of the investigation. ....

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  • A Structure-Based Model Analysis Of Ventilation And Contrast Gas Distribution In The Ovine Lung

    Mitchell, JH; Hoffman, EA; Mitchell, Jennine (2011-05-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rationale: Sheep are increasingly used as a model for human ventilation, however there are substantive anatomical differences between human and ovine lungs that may affect the gravitational distribution of tissue at rest and during ventilation. Understanding ventilation and gas transport in the ovine lung is important for interpreting measurements acquired via in vivo gas contrast imaging, such as xenon enhanced computed tomography (Xe-CT). In this study a computational model that integrates finite elastic deformation of the soft tissue with distribution of inspired air was applied to the ovine lung to determine whether a model that is consistent with human ventilation and gas distribution in also suitable for the simulation of ventilation in experimental animals. Methods: Xe-CT imaging was acquired in three sheep at the University of Iowa Division of Physiologic Imaging. Image based finite element meshes were constructed for each lung and the airway tree at a positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 25 cmH 20 in prone and supine postures. Ventilation and gas transport were simulated for each animal using a computational model that includes finite deformation elasticity to define the pressure volume relationship of the lung, and time-dependent advective and diffusive transport of inhaled Xe gas. Gravitational deformation was simulated prone and supine, and ventilation was simulated for the prone lung. The specific volume change predicted from the advective flow simulation was compared to specific ventilation calculated using the time constant method that is used in Xe-CT analysis. Results: The finite deformation model accurately predicts the regional tissue density in prone but underestimates the supine gradient. Ventilation simulated in the prone posture for each of the three animals indicates that the ventilation distribution predicted by an advective flow model typically differs from that predicted from the time constant method of analysis. The R 2 correlations between the simulations and time constant calculations were 0.7824, 0.3423 and 0.42881 for each of the three animals. Conclusions: The human-consistent model is inadequate for predicting ventilation in supine sheep, because the model does not include movement of the heart or fluid shifts that were evident in the imaging. However the model is sufficiently predictive for the prone ovine lung. That advective ventilation differs from inert gas transport is consistent with experimental findings that show a correlation of R 2 of 0.66 between specific volume and ventilation calculated from tracer gas mixing (1). Fuld et al (2008) J. Appl. Physiol 104:1174-1184 This abstract is funded by: NIH Grant ROI-HL-064368-06A1

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  • What Does My Grade Mean?: Differing Assessment Models in Chemistry.

    Salter, David (2009-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Determining whether students have learnt what was intended is a crucial aspect of every course. How this is done and what the outcome shows can however vary greatly. Traditionally in New Zealand, tertiary students’ academic ability is assessed using methods that allow for discrimination between students through norm-referencing, typically producing a single cumulative percentage value which is translated into a letter grade. In contrast, the Government-mandated system for assessing secondary school students in New Zealand is based on a model of criterion-referenced assessment that aims to describe students’ current level of performance with reference to specific performance criteria which are derived from national curriculum statements. Consequently, in progressing from secondary to tertiary education in New Zealand, students experience a major change in the assessment of their performance from being independent of others to being relative to others. A comparison of these two assessment systems used in New Zealand will be presented as well as a description of how standards-based assessment is being introduced into several first-year tertiary chemistry courses as a way to better indicate students’ current capabilities and assist students in the transition between secondary and tertiary education.

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  • Design of a water soluble amethyrin macrocycle

    Albrett, Amelia; Brothers, Penelope; Aguilar, A; Lee, JT; Sessler, JL (2006-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This JPP issue contains all abstracts accepted for presentation at the Fourth International Conference of Porphyrins and Phthalocyanines (ICPP-4) which was held in Rome, Italy, July 2-7, 2006 and coorganized by Drs Roberto Paolesse and Pietro Tagliatesta from the University of Rome “Tor Vergata”. The printed book of abstracts was given to all ICPP-4 attendees, being a necessary tool to follow the rich scientific program of the meeting, and should also prove useful to those readers of JPP who were not able to attend the biennial scientific meeting of the Society of Porphyrins and Phthalocyanines (SPP).

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  • Context and relationship: defining resilience in health social workers

    Adamson, Carole; Beddoe, Elizabeth; Huggard, Peter (2011-11-05)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A qualitative study of social workers in physical and mental health asked experienced social workers who self-defined as resilient to define the concept and to explore the elements of resiliency within their practice. Initial definition of resilience as a personal characteristic was developed into a strongly contextual and relational construct, the binding feature of which was self-awareness and the capacity to reflect. A strong feature of the social workers’ understanding of resilience was their focus on relationship with colleagues and the quality of professional social work practice with service users. Further reflexive and structural elements in their professional lives were identified, highlighting that resilience within health social workers is in dynamic relationship with the organisational context. A resilience framework derived from current literature and from the research is presented.

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  • Paired catchment research reveals WSUD influences on stream ecosystem condition at average and low residential densities

    van Roon, Marjorie (2013-11-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Water Sensitive Urban Design has much in common with the New Zealand (NZ) practice, Low Impact Urban Design and Development (LIUDD). In New Zealand, both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem protection and re-creation are essential elements of greenfield developments that conform to LIUDD. This paper reports on comparative New Zealand catchment studies over 7 years for conventional and Water Sensitive Urban Design subdivision at low/countryside (2000 – 5000 m2 lots) and average/urban (400 - 500 m2 lots) residential densities. Subdivision, re-vegetation and house construction are now nearing completion. Catchment characteristics are related to the health of in-stream macro-invertebrate communities as indicators of stream and catchment condition. Results for in-stream indicators are compared to region-wide values and show the ecological superiority of WSUD/LIUDD catchments. Indicators of stream ecological health in treatment catchments have improved for two urban streams and up to three countryside residential streams during the subdivision and house construction period contrary to normal expectations for conventional urban development.

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  • Moving From Hard Copy to Online Marking Made Easy

    Li, C; Sheridan, Donald (2015-06)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Significant efficiencies can be made in marking classes with large enrolment using a workflow that involves existing or inexpensive technologies. This poster describes how innovative processes saved time, money, improved educational outcomes and quality assurance.

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  • Loop closure and kinase selectivity in lung cancer

    Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher (2016-07-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Somatic mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors that causes aberrant signalling have been implicated in the development of lung cancer. Two such receptors, EGFR and FGFR kinases are directly involved in many cases of aggressive metastasis and drug resistance. The FGFR kinase family consists of four highly conserved receptor proteins (FGFR1 ??? FGFR4). FGFR pathways are the main cause of resistance to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer patients, and 22% of them show over-expression of FGFR1. There are a number of small molecules in phase III clinical trials that target not only FGFR but also other kinases. A wide range of EGFR mutations are linked to lung cancer development in never-smokers or former smokers. The two most common mutations are exon 19 deletions and the point mutation L858R in exon 21. Many patients harbouring L858R acquire a secondary T790M mutation after treatment with gefitinib/erlotinib resulting in drug resistance. In the past few years AstraZeneca have developed drugs that target specific proteins, eg; AZD4547 (FGFR1 selective) and AZD9291 (selectivity for T790M/L858R EGFR). In an effort to design our own novel and selective inhibitors, we solved the structures of AZD4547 and AZD9291 in complex with FGFR and EGFR respectively. In both cases, the phosphate binding loop (P-loop) of the proteins forms an unusual ???bent??? structure wrapped closely around these inhibitors. We speculate that the ability of these compounds to induce P-loop closure is an important part of their respective selectivity mechanisms.

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  • Investigation into the racemic X-ray structure of the antimicrobial protein snakin-1

    Yeung, Ho; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher; Harris, Paul; Baker, Edward; Brimble, Margaret (2015-08-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Snakin-1 is a 63 residue antimicrobial protein originally isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum).1 It is active against a number of bacterial and fungal phytopathogens such as Clavibacter michiganensis, Pseudomonas syringae and Fusarium solani. Snakin-1 is a member of the GASA (gibberellic acid stimulated in Arabidopsis)/snakin family and the mature protein consists of a GASA domain incorporating six intramolecular disulfide bonds.2 The amino acid sequences of these proteins do not correspond to any known structural motifs. GASA/snakin proteins are found in a variety of plant species and appear to be involved in a range of functions including cell elongation and cell division.2 Their expression profiles support these roles and are commonly linked to development.2 It has also been speculated that the 12 conserved cysteines in these proteins perform a role in redox regulation.2 We have recently completed the total chemical synthesis of native Snakin-1 and showed that its antimicrobial activity is comparable to that of the naturally occurring protein.3 In an attempt to understand how this small protein functions we have determined its threedimensional structure by X-ray crystallography using a quasi-racemic protein system.4 Phase information for structural determination was obtained by radiation-damage induced phasing.5 The structure of snakin-1 appears to be novel, different to known classes of cysteine-rich plant antimicrobial peptide. Its features include a large and distinctly electropositive loop that we speculate to be membrane targeting, and a two helix bundle which is a potential membrane-interacting feature able to disrupt the structural integrity of its target bacteria.

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  • Children who learn in more than one language in Aotearoa/New Zealand: New challenges and research processes

    Harvey, Nola; Podmore, Valerie; Hedges, Helen; Keegan, Peter; Mara, D; Lee, Jennifer; Tuafuti, P (2013-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Demographic evidence indicates that learners in Aotearoa-New Zealand are increasingly likely to speak more than one language and that this is most evident in the Auckland region. These trends suggest emerging challenges for researchers and practitioners. This poster presents our TLRI* research, in progress, which documents the diversity of language use and experiences of children in early childhood education and care in the Auckland region. The collaborative research team includes University of Auckland researchers and teacherresearchers in four early childhood centres: a M??ori-medium centre, a Samoan immersion centre, and a kindergarten and a centre with children from a wide range of heritage language backgrounds. Theoretical frameworks influencing the design and analyses include an additive approach to bilingual activity and contexts that views children as potentially capable. The research (2013-2015) addresses three questions: 1. What languages do children from participating ECE centres use in their learning in the centre and at home? 2. What experiences and outcomes for children who learn in more than one language in the early years are valued by parents, teachers, and children? 3. How might the opportunities and challenges for children who learn in more than one language be addressed in educational practice? Objectives within each of the four partner-centre settings are to: ?? document the languages spoken by children, parents, and teachers in the ECE centre and at home ?? document and interpret the learning experiences of young children who learn in more than one language (as valued by parents, teachers, and children) ?? document the valued outcomes for young children who learn in more than one language ?? in partnership between teacher-researchers and University of Auckland researchers, analyse and theorise the data gathered, using funds of knowledge and additive bilingualism approaches, to build on understandings of the learning and teaching of children who learn in more than one language, and ?? analyse and theorise, using an 'additive approach' (to bilingualism, immersion, or multi-literacies), to extend understandings of the learning and teaching of children who learn in more than one language.) Research team members are using a range of qualitative and quantitative approaches to generate data about the experiences, opportunities, and challenges associated with learning in more than one language. Methods/tools include: questionnaires for parents and teachers, focus group interviews with parents and teachers, and fieldnote observations of arrivals and departures at the centres, videotaped observations of children's learning experiences in ECE settings, and conversations with children. In the poster session, aspects of these processes will be discussed. This research is significant, given the demographics and that there are gaps in current knowledge about learning experiences, valued outcomes and possible futures for children who are learning in more than one language in their ECE and (or) their family environments. Our study is designed to contribute new findings and to advance knowledge and practice about children learning in more than one language in the early years.

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  • What should be stored in Biobanks? Using computational modelling to unravel genotype to phenotype linkage

    Cooling, Michael; Atalag, Koray (2016-10-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • So what does linking computational models with clinical data mean and how to do it?

    Atalag, Koray; Kalbasi, R; Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Nickerson, David; Warren, James; Cooling, M; Hunter, Peter (2017-02-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Linking computational physiology models with clinical data has been proposed to help real-world model validation as well as enable personalised and predictive clinical decision support systems. Electronic health records (EHR) are sinks of biomedical knowledge and include manifestations of genomic and environmental aspects that impact on biological systems. We describe how to use openEHR to normalise, annotate and link clinical data with computational models.

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  • Bridging Computational Modelling and Clinical Information using openEHR and Semantic Web

    Atalag, Koray; Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Kalbasi, R; Cooling, Michael; Nickerson, David; Hunter, Peter (2016-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Linking clinical data to computational physiology is a crucial step for personalised and predictive Medicine. Electronic health records (EHR) embody quantifiable manifestations of genetic and environmental effects that impact on biological systems. Recent attempts to enable this linkage heavily rely on semantic technologies however in the world of EHRs Semantic Web has very limited use. openEHR provides open engineering specifications and tooling to tackle health data which supports Semantic Web. We are setting up an openEHR-based research data repository at ABI to normalise and annotate clinical and experimental data with an aim to integrate with the Physiome Model Repository (PMR).

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  • Managing inpatient hypoglycaemia: A clinical audit

    Coats, A; Marshall, Dianne (2010-09-10)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim To examine nursing management of hypoglycaemic episodes in the hospitalised adult patient with Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in the general medical/surgical wards at a secondary level hospital. Objective To describe hypoglycaemia treatment patterns in the adult inpatient by examining nursing adherence to the Northland District Health Board hospital hypoglycaemia protocol. Method A retrospective audit of 32 sets of treatment and progress notes identified nurses??? adherence to the protocol for management of inpatient hypoglycaemia . Results Adherence to the individual steps of the protocol was low. Nurses administered the recommended initial treatment in 40.4% of cases. Within 30 minutes of detection, 36.7% episodes were corrected. Medical staff were informed of hypoglycaemia in 11.4% of cases. This step achieved the lowest adherence. Nurses documented 87.7% of episodes. There was a high degree of recurrent hypoglycaemia (71.9%). Discussion It is critical to patient outcomes that the steps of the protocol are undertaken correctly. Failure to provide the recommended treatment resulted in some patients experiencing prolonged episodes. Whilst frequency of nursing documentation of episodes was high, critical assessment of causes and or a management plan were not routinely documented. Nurses did not routinely advise medical staff of episodes, consequently medical review of causes of hypoglycaemia and the management plan occurred infrequently. Failure to review management contributed to the high number of recurrent episodes.

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  • Safety and efficacy of a superantigen based vaccine carrier in human MHC II-CD4 transgenic mice

    Radcliff, FJ; Munro, GH; Fraser, JD (2008-12-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Inhibition of complement by Staphylococcal superantigen-like protein 7 in vitro and in vivo

    Lorenz, Natalie; Fraser, John; Radcliff, F (2010-12-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Targeting synthetic glycopeptides to MGL on Dermal Dendritic cells

    McIntosh, Julie; Angel, CE; Chen, CJJ; Manning, K; Mansell, Claudia; Agrawai, S; Harris, Paul; Williams, Geoffrey; Squire, Christopher; Brimble, Margaret; Dunbar, Peter (2011-02-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The ability of a peptide vaccine to stimulate T cells in vivo might be improved by specifically targeting the peptide to dendritic cells (DC). The C-type lectin Macrophage Galactose-type lectin, MGL (CD301), has been shown to bind to N-acetyl-galactosamine (GalNAc) and small peptides bearing O-linked GalNAc. Synthetic GalNAc can be produced using relatively simple organic chemistry when compared with the complicated branched sugars that are recognised by other C-type lectins. MGL therefore represents a promising target for the design of synthetic peptide vaccines. We have identified that antigen-presenting cells in human skin express MGL and have confirmed that CD14+ dermal DCs might be targeted via MGL. The intracellular fate of MGL following internalisation was tracked by confocal microscopy. MGL traffics through early endosomes to late endosomes/lysosomes, and colocalises with MHC class I and class II. Synthetic glycopeptides were produced incorporating either native O-linked GalNAc or GalNAc residues linked to the peptide chain via non-native ???Click??? chemistry. Biophysical analysis of the ability of both ???Click??? and native glycopeptides peptides with recombinant MGL confirmed the ability of both these peptides to bind MGL. Ongoing work aims to determine whether targeting to MGL using these synthetic peptides results in efficient presentation of antigen to T cells.

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  • The management of change in social services in Aotearoa New Zealand: An examination of the influence of post 1987 'new public managerialism, on organizational culture

    Webster, Michael (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    New public managerialism??? has transformed organizational cultures of public/NGO sectors ???Government by contract??? inaugurated: Accountability for specified outputs Performance agreements between Ministers and Chief Executives Devolution of accountability required managers to develop leadership skills, strategic thinking, business planning, and performance management systems International Federation of Social Work recognition of management (???core purpose of social work???) professionally validates the project

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