280 results for Conference poster

  • Diagnostic Utility of a Next Generation Sequencing Retinal Panel in a M??ori and Polynesian population with Inherited Retinal Disease

    Vincent, Andrea; Coysh, A; van Bysterveldt, K; Oliver, Verity; Black, G (2016-05-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Engaging citizenship; formations of professionalism in social development practice - Doctoral Study

    Harington, Philip (2009-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    As an occupational identity emerges, how are critical elements of professionalism resolved in practice?

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  • Coupled mechanics and airflow of a human lung

    Hedges, KL; Hunter, PJ; Tawhai, MH (2006)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    To study the ventilation distribution within a human lung a model has been produced that couples soft tissue mechanics and a simplified airflow solution.

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  • The skeletal effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib

    O'Sullivan, Susannah; Lin, Jian; Watson, M; Callon, K; Tong, PC; Naot, Dorit; Horne, Anne; Aati, O; Porteous, F; Gamble, G; Cornish, Jillian; Browett, Peter; Grey, Andrew (2011-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Fostering the exchange of geoscience resources for knowledge exploration and discovery

    Whitehead, Brandon; Gahegan, Mark; Everett, M; Hills, S; Brodaric, B (2010-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Geoscience data capture is expensive. In order to extract maximum value, the data need to be consistently described, easily found, and then shared among those who need it. There has been recent momentum in the geoscience community to develop a common descriptive framework which facilitates data sharing. While storage and transfer standards are vital, they lack a descriptive element which standarizes the meaning of their contents. Metadata capture is appropriate for data stores, but often the terminology carries different meanings as domains become more specialised. For example, the term ???migration??? to a petroleum geochemist refers to the movement of hydrocarbons in geologic time, yet to a seismologist describes an imaging process. Furthermore, concepts associated with a term may change through time or as contextual factors in a discussion are modified. How, therefore, can the concepts evoked from geoscience resource terminology be defined and aligned to represent this multi-scaled orthogonal variability? Here we show how a community knowledge acquisition exercise was orchestrated to discuss fundamental concepts and their meanings as interpreted by leaders in basin characterization. The result of this exercise is a formal description of many of the features and processes associated with sedimentary basins, i.e. a basin ontology. This ontology allows the use of semantic connections between concepts as a backbone for search and discovery of research artifacts in large data stores.

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  • First born children have reduced insulin sensitivity, higher blood pressure and taller stature than later born children

    Savage, T; Ayyavoo, A; Mouat, F; Miles, H; Hofman, Paul; Cutfield, WS (2012-07-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cortisol response to Synacthen stimulation is attenuated following abusive head trauma

    Heather, N; Derraik, J; Brennan, C; Hofman, Paul; Jefferies, C; Cutfield, W (2012-06-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Is keratoconus a case of matrix remodelling gone crazy?

    Brookes, Nigel; Loh, IP; Clover, GM; Poole, CA; Sherwin, Trevor (2002)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Multi-dimensional model generalisation of human activity patterns in space and time

    Zhao, Jinfeng; Forer, Pip (2007-09-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of New Zealand Sauvignon blanc

    Herbst, M; Nicolau, Laura; Kilmartin, Paul (2009-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Stability of varietal aromas in Marlborough Sauvignon blanc wines

    Herbst, M; Kilmartin, Paul; Nicolau, Laura (2007-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Factors Influencing the Aroma Stability of Sauvignon blanc Wines

    Herbst-Johnstone, Mandy; Nicolau, L; Kilmartin, Paul (2010-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Variations in Extemporaneous Ophthalmic Practices in New Zealand Hospitals

    Gargiulo, Derryn; Kairuz, Therese (2006-11-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    In New Zealand certain dosage forms are not readily available as a result of government policy on the funding of pharmaceuticals. Extemporaneous ophthalmic formulations are required for a variety of patients, and the challenge to demonstrate that such products are prepared in accordance with best practice. Extemporaneous compounding is considered an area of pharmaceutical activity that carries a high risk of error in terms of safety and quality. This can be increased by the number of aseptic manipulations.

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  • A Structure-Based Model Analysis Of Ventilation And Contrast Gas Distribution In The Ovine Lung

    Mitchell, JH; Hoffman, EA; Mitchell, Jennine (2011-05-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rationale: Sheep are increasingly used as a model for human ventilation, however there are substantive anatomical differences between human and ovine lungs that may affect the gravitational distribution of tissue at rest and during ventilation. Understanding ventilation and gas transport in the ovine lung is important for interpreting measurements acquired via in vivo gas contrast imaging, such as xenon enhanced computed tomography (Xe-CT). In this study a computational model that integrates finite elastic deformation of the soft tissue with distribution of inspired air was applied to the ovine lung to determine whether a model that is consistent with human ventilation and gas distribution in also suitable for the simulation of ventilation in experimental animals. Methods: Xe-CT imaging was acquired in three sheep at the University of Iowa Division of Physiologic Imaging. Image based finite element meshes were constructed for each lung and the airway tree at a positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 25 cmH 20 in prone and supine postures. Ventilation and gas transport were simulated for each animal using a computational model that includes finite deformation elasticity to define the pressure volume relationship of the lung, and time-dependent advective and diffusive transport of inhaled Xe gas. Gravitational deformation was simulated prone and supine, and ventilation was simulated for the prone lung. The specific volume change predicted from the advective flow simulation was compared to specific ventilation calculated using the time constant method that is used in Xe-CT analysis. Results: The finite deformation model accurately predicts the regional tissue density in prone but underestimates the supine gradient. Ventilation simulated in the prone posture for each of the three animals indicates that the ventilation distribution predicted by an advective flow model typically differs from that predicted from the time constant method of analysis. The R 2 correlations between the simulations and time constant calculations were 0.7824, 0.3423 and 0.42881 for each of the three animals. Conclusions: The human-consistent model is inadequate for predicting ventilation in supine sheep, because the model does not include movement of the heart or fluid shifts that were evident in the imaging. However the model is sufficiently predictive for the prone ovine lung. That advective ventilation differs from inert gas transport is consistent with experimental findings that show a correlation of R 2 of 0.66 between specific volume and ventilation calculated from tracer gas mixing (1). Fuld et al (2008) J. Appl. Physiol 104:1174-1184 This abstract is funded by: NIH Grant ROI-HL-064368-06A1

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  • Safety and efficacy of a superantigen based vaccine carrier in human MHC II-CD4 transgenic mice

    Radcliff, FJ; Munro, GH; Fraser, JD (2008-12-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Islet human amylin oligomer formation is differentially correlated with ??-cell death and diabetes onset between homozygous and hemizygous human amylin transgenic mice

    Zhang, S; Liu, H; Li, XL; Au, M; Chuang, CL; Cooper, GJS (2010)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    One of the pathological features of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the presence of islet amyloid deposits comprising mainly human amylin (hA)/hIAPP. Recent studies suggested that soluble oligomers of human amylin may be the primary cause of ??-cell damage and thus contribute to the onset/development of T2DM. However, the molecular basis of this process remains to be fully elucidated. We aimed to investigate the connection between soluble oligomers and hA cytotoxicity, and their correlation with diabetes development using a rodent model of diabetes.

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  • Resources and strategies used in New Zealand community pharmacies to identify and assist patients with low literacy: An opportunity to improve health outcomes

    Aspden, Trudi; Sheridan, Jane; McKie, J (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Patients with lower literacy generally have less knowledge of health services, poorer health outcomes' and are more likely to have difficulty understanding prescription medication warning labels. To determine how pharmacy staff identify patients with limited literacy skills, the strategies used for identification, the resources available to help patients with low literacy and opportunities for up skilling. A questionnaire was adapted from one developed by Praska et al 20053. A random sample of 120 New Zealand pharmacies were sent information about the study. Those pharmacists willing to participate were interviewed by telephone. ....

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  • Metabolic Outcomes in children born to mothers with severe hyperemesis gravidarum

    Ayyavoo, A; Hofman, Paul; Derraik, J; Mathai, M; Stone, P; Bloomfield, F; Cutfield, C (2012-06-23)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Etiology of increasing incidence of congenital hypothyroidism in New Zealand from 1993 to 2010

    Albert, B; Jefferies, C; Webster, D; Cutfield, W; Gunn, A; Carll, J; Bendikson, K; Derraik, J; Hofman, Paul (2012-06-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Regional Structure of Technical Innovation

    O'Neale, DR; Hendy, SC (2014-06-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is strong evidence that the productivity per capita of cities and regions increases with population. One likely factor behind this phenomenon is agglomeration; densely populated regions are able to bring together otherwise unlikely combinations of individuals and organisations with diverse, specialised capabilities. But clearly not all possible combinations of capability are equally valuable, nor are they equally likely. In order to investigate patterns in the typical combinations of capabilities, we have used the REGPAT patent database to construct a bipartite network of geographic regions and the patent classes for which those regions display a revealed comparative advantage. By identifying the pairs of patent classes that are most likely to co-occur within regions, we can infer relationships between the classes, giving a new network that maps out the structure of technical innovation. The resulting network has a core-periphery structure with a central group of highly connected technologies surrounded by branches of more specialised combinations. We investigate measures such as the diversity of regional patent portfolios and the ubiquity of patent classes across regions. We find that diversity is positively correlated with regional population, while the average ubiquity of patents in a region???s patent portfolio is negatively correlated. This suggests that more populous regions are able to expand into more specialised and higher value parts of the patent network.

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