277 results for Conference poster

  • Searching for anomalous light curves in massive data sets

    Rattenbury, Nicholas (2014-01-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The photometric surveys currently under way by the MOA and OGLE collaborations have produced and are extending databases of millions of stellar light curves. These databases have allowed investigations into diverse astrophysical fields including variable stars, proper motion studies and Galactic structure. Odd, or otherwise curious events have been discovered in the databases. We consider here one such event and propose methods for discovering more like it in the microlensing databases. A further aim of this initial work is to set out the prospects of the classification scheme for identifying time series that are maximally discordant - i.e. those that do not look like any other time series in the data set, and which therefore, may be of particular interest.

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  • What influences the association between previous and future crashes among cyclists.

    Tin Tin, Sandar; Woodward, Alistair; Ameratunga, Shanthi (2014-10-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Characterisation of a transgenic ovine model of Huntington???s disease

    Reid, Susanne; Handley, R; Patassini, S; Rudiger, S; Keynes, P; McLaughlan, C; Waldvogel, H; Jacobsen, J; MacDonald, M; Gusella, J; Morton, J; Bawden, S; Faull, R; Snell, R (2011-09-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    A transgenic ovine model of Huntington???s disease has been developed to enable the examination of the earliest disease changes in a large mammal. Ovis aries were selected because their basal ganglia and cortex is similar to analogous regions of the human brain. Importantly, they live for more than a decade, allowing for the study of the chronic effects of a fulllength HTT expressing transgene. Microinjection of a fulllength human HD cDNA containing 73 polyglutamine repeats under the control of the human promoter, resulted in six transgenic founders varying in copy-number of the transgene.

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  • Talking Allowed!

    Davies, Maree; Sinclair, A (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Research on the Paideia Method (a method for discussing a topic) was conducted in 20 classrooms across five schools, of varying socioeconomic environments (ages 11-13) in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2010. The researchers sought to further examine the results from their pilot study of the Paideia Seminar, entitled 'Talking Allowed: I like it when the teacher lets us talk without telling us what to say', trialed in 2008 (Sinclair & Davies, 2011). In addition, in order to provide the optimum conditions to prepare the students for the face-to-face seminars, an online component (open source software) was added as an alternative medium to assist students in their preparation. The research questions were: What happens to the Nature of Interaction, and the Complexity of the Discussion when students participate in a Paideia Seminar, and an on-line discussion in preparation for the face-to-face seminar? What is the optimal role of the teacher when participating in a Paideia Seminar and an on-line discussion to increase complexity of discussion?

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  • Preclinical rationale for the ongoing Phase 2 study of the hypoxia-activated EGFR-TKI tarloxotinib bromide (TH-4000) in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) or skin (SCCS).

    Jackson, V; Silva, S; Abbattista, Maria; Guise, Christopher; Bull, Matthew; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Hart, C; Pearce, T; Smaill, Jeffrey; Patterson, Adam (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Multi-Scale and Multi-Physics Visualization

    Blackett, Shane; Bullivant, D; Nickerson, David; Hunter, Peter (2005-07-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Accurate computational models of physiology require the coupling of different physical processes that occur across a wide range of spatial scales. The interpretation and analysis of the calculated results of these models require the integrated visualization of these multi-scale and multi-physics processes. A number of different strategies for doing this are presented for a model of the heart left ventricle.

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  • Urea cycle enzymes and peptidylarginine deiminase in Alzheimer's superior frontal gyrus

    Cicolini, J; Jing, Y; Waldvogel, Henry; Faull, Richard; Liu, P (2016-07-24)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The spirit that is one's own: A conversation in two tongues, Ko te wairua n?? te tangata ake: He whakawhitiwhiti k??rerorero ki roto i ng?? reo e rua

    Dattaray, D; Keegan, Peter (2016-11-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Indigenous epistemes and philosophies help one understand ethical responsibilities in a changing world, between knowing and learning. Aesthetic, socio-political, cultural and normative aspects of human existence are reflected in Indigenous narrative traditions and language practices. This paper attempts to forge connections between the historical and discursive Indigenous practices of M??ori of New Zealand and Karbis from the North East of India. M??ori are the only indigenous group in New Zealand. M??ori are now highly urbanized, in a largely English speaking and Western dominated context, yet have made important gains in language and cultural revitalization. The North East of India today is a profound paradox that simultaneously represents the frontiers of globalization as well as a heritage of Indigenous traditions and cultures. In present-day India, the ???North East??? often denotes a sense of geographical isolation and is perceived as a region of ethnic strife and violence. North East is also a treasure trove of culture and tradition belonging to hundreds of Indigenous communities from the region. Through an interdisciplinary dialogue, the paper attempts a rethink on issues of public accessibility, intellectual and cultural property rights. Further, it underlines the significance of reciprocal education and training in the context of Indigeneity.

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  • Population Pharmacokinetics of Ethanol in Moderate and Heavy Drinkers

    Jiang, Y; Holford, Nicholas; Murry, DJ; Brown, TL; Milavetz, G (2015-10-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of sex, age, and previous drinking history on ethanol pharmacokinetic parameters with the implementation of a rate dependent extraction model [1], which takes into account the change in hepatic first-pass extraction along with absorption rate and a body composition model that accounts for fat free mass and fat mass [2]. Methods: 108 moderate or heavy drinkers were dosed orally on 2 occasions to achieve a peak blood ethanol concentration of 0.65 g/L or 1.15 g/L using a randomized, crossover design. A total of 6025 breath measurements were obtained and converted into blood alcohol concentration by applying a blood: breath ratio of 2100:1. NONMEM 7.3.0 was used for data analysis. A semi-mechanistic rate dependent extraction model with zero-order input followed by first order absorption was utilized with V allometrically scaled by normal fat mass, Vmax allometrically scaled by total body weight and portal vein blood flow allometrically scaled by fat free mass. The effects of sex and age (21???34, 38???51, or 55???68 years of age) on V, Vmax, and Km; and the effect of drinking status (moderate or heavy drinkers) on Vmax and Km were explored. The covariate effect was considered to be statistically significant if the 95 % non-parametric bootstrap confidence interval of the fractional difference did not include 1. Results: The 95 % bootstrap confidence interval of fractional differences between groups in age, sex and ethanol consumption history all contain 1, indicating none of those covariates have significant effects on any ethanol disposition parameters. Conclusions: Age and sex were not regarded as significant predictors for ethanol disposition parameters after accounting for body size and composition. The results indicated a 19 % higher Vmax and 15 % lower Km for heavy drinkers compared with moderate drinkers, but the difference was not statistically significant.

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  • Identification of a novel group of muscular dystrophies, the Anoctaminopathies, caused by recessive mutations in the putative calcium activated chloride channel, ANO5

    Marlow, Gareth; Bolduc, V; Boycott, KM; Saleki, K; Inoue, H; Kroon, J; Itakura, M; Robitaille, Y; Parent, L; Baas, F; Mizuta, K; Kamata, N; Richard, I; Linssen, W; Mahjneh, I; de Visser, M; Brais, B; Bashir, R (2010-03-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Anoctamin (ANO) family consists of 10 proteins several of which have been shown to correspond to the elusive calciumactivated chloride channels (CaCCs). CaCCs are gated by increases in intracellular calcium and they have been linked to several cellular functions including epithelial transport, cell volume regulation, olfactory and photoreceptor transduction, cardiac membrane excitability, and smooth muscle contraction. The only reported human mutations linked with the ANO family are dominant mutations in ANO5, which cause a rare bone fragility disorder gnathodiaphyseal dysplasia (GDD1). Recently we have identified recessive ANO5 mutations in patients with proximal limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2L) and a distal non-dysferlin Miyoshi myopathy (MMD3). The mutations identified consist of splice site, a single adenine duplication and missense. The duplicated adenine is present in LGMD2L and MMD3. The LGMD2L phenotype is characterized by proximal muscle weakness and prominent asymmetric quadriceps atrophy. The MMD3 phenotype is associated with distal weakness in particular of the calf muscles. The clinical heterogeneity associated with ANO5 mutations is reminiscent of that observed with dysferlin mutations which can cause both a LGMD and distal muscular dystrophy. ANO5 mutations are associated with loss of muscle membrane integrity and defective membrane repair. Our studies suggest that ANO5 is a putative calcium-activated chloride channel which may function with dysferlin in membrane repair. Our study has identified a novel group of muscular dystrophies ???the Anoctaminopathies???.

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  • Diversity in Large Classes: The Challenge Of Providing Self Directed Formative Learning

    Harper, Amanda; Brittain, Judith (2007-12-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    First year science courses at the University of Auckland face a number of common challenges which impact on course design and learning support for individual students. The large student cohorts (> 1100) entering courses are not only diverse in future program choices but also in their educational backgrounds. Opportunities for formative learning have been developed though the web environment using the university???s ???in house??? learning management system Cecil, and Bestchoice (an interactive learning portal). http://bestchoice.net.nz (Woodgate and Titheridge 2006). These formative learning activities have been integrated into existing course designs (Gunn & Harper 2006) to support diversity in learning strategies and learning styles while enabling all students to develop a sound body of knowledge essential in the discipline of Science. Teachers across the disciplines of Chemistry and Biological Sciences maintain a professional dialogue about learning developments. There is an overlap of the order of 80% across the Biology and Chemistry cohorts. Where it is appropriate, similar technologies are used. This commonality between courses results in improvements in students??? learning outcomes. This is part of teaching reflective practice which is currently influencing future developments.

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  • Potential Uses of Adipose Derived Stem Cells in Reconstructed Human Skin

    Feisst, Vaughan; Dunbar, PR (2011-01-30)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Adipose derived stem cells (ASC) are multipotent adult mesenchymal stem cells with great potential for use in regenerative medicine. ASC are obtained from lipoaspirate, making them a relatively abundant and accessible source of adult stem cells. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate whether ASC can substitute dermal fibroblasts, and provide benefits for neovascularisation, in reconstructed human skin.

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  • A Computational Model For Cerebral Circulation And Its Application For Haemodynamic Modelling In Vascular Surgeries

    Ho, Harvey; Mithraratne, K; Hunter, Peter (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Lower Limb Estimation from Sparse Landmarks using an Articulated Shape Model

    Zhang, Ju; Hislop-Jambrich, J; Besier, Thor (2016-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Rapid generation of lower limb musculoskeletal models is essential for patient-specific gait modeling. Motion-capture is a routine part of gait assessment but contains relatively sparse geometric information. We present an articulated statistical shape model of the lower limb that estimates realistic bone geometry, pose, and muscle attachment regions from seven commonly used motion-capture markers. Our method obtained a lower (p=0.02) surface error of 4.5 mm RMS compared to 8.5 mm RMS using standard isotropic scaling, and was more robust, converging in all 26 test cases compared to 20 for isotropic scaling.

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  • Measuring mindfulness at interval level: Transformation of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire using Rasch approach

    Medvedev, Oleg; Siegert, RJ; Kerston, P; Kr??geloh, CU (2016-05-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: Significant contribution of mindfulness to individuals??? health and well-being requires precise mindfulness measures for accurate assessment of psychological and cognitive changes in individuals undergoing mindfulness-based interventions. The widely used measure of trait mindfulness the 39-item Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ; Baer, Smith, Hopkins, Krietemeyer, & Toney, 2006) including: Observing, Describing, Act With Awareness, Non-Judging and Non-reacting to inner experience has shown acceptable psychometric properties but no efforts were made to increase precision of its subscales in discriminating between trait levels. Method: Rasch analysis was conducted to enhance the psychometric properties of the FFMQ using sample of 296 participants. Results: The best fit to the Rasch model was achieved for all five FFMQ subscales after minor modifications that involved combining locally dependent items into subtests and removing two items that critically affected the estimates. Discussion: Findings support structural validity of the FFMQ subscales and allow researchers and clinicians transform ordinal FFMQ responses to interval level data suitable for parametric statistics, which increases measurement precision. Conversion tables are included here for convenience and can be used without any modifications of the original FFMQ response format. Further implications of these findings are discussed.

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  • How do we make a generic social work curriculum disaster???informed?

    Adamson, Carole (2017-05-29)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Globally, the social work qualifying curriculum is a dynamic construction of core subjects reflective of local contexts, responsive to the principles of the IFSW definition (IFSW, 2014). Whilst the urgency of disaster highlights the imperative for determining the nature of the social work role and response, the possibilities of a disaster-informed curriculum are often subsumed within a host of competing demands. How then can we plan for the unpredictable and ensure that a qualifying social work curriculum contains sufficient preparation for graduate capacity in disaster risk reduction (DRR)? Whilst a minority of qualifying programmes contain specific disaster modules, the challenge for much of social work education is to insert sufficient disaster knowledge through linkages to existing curriculum foci. Starting with an overview of skills and knowledge required for DRR, this practical presentation illustrates ways in which a generic social work curriculum can be infiltrated and embedded with disaster-informed knowledge.

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  • Characterisation of the Genetic Controls of Branching in Petunia

    Simons, Joanne; Templeton, KR; Plummer, K; Beveridge, CA; Snowden, Kimberley (2005-10-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Branching is a fundamental process affecting plant form and is a source of much of the wide variety of plant architecture seen in nature. Our aim is to understand the function of genes involved in branching using petunia as a model system. This research involves the study of the decreased apical dominance (dad) mutants in petunia, which have increased basal branching compared with wild type. It also involves the investigation of genes known to affect branching in other plant species to discover their effects in petunia. One of these genes, MAX2, was identified from an increased branching mutant in Arabidopsis, and its effects in petunia are being investigated by misexpression of the petunia orthologue. Previous grafting experiments using the dad mutants in petunia have shown that a graft-transmissible signal is involved in causing the increased branching phenotype. Hormones are graft-transmissible chemicals and variation in their levels play important roles in the control of apical dominance, one of the most studied controls in lateral branching. Auxin and cytokinin levels in dad mutant and wild type plants were investigated, but the levels of these hormones were not consistent with them being the graft-transmissible signal modified by the DAD genes. In order to investigate the relationships between the DAD genes, the branching phenotypes of the single and double dad mutants were characterised and analysed. Grafting experiments to investigate the interactions between the DAD genes in controlling the branching signal were also undertaken. This work has revealed interactions between the DAD genes and provided evidence for the order of action of these genes.

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  • Synthesis and mechanistic studies of PLA??? inihibition by the marine alkaloid hyrtiosulawesine

    Liew, Lydia; Bourguet-Kondracki, M-L; Copp, BR (2010-10-17)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The first isolation of hyrtiosulawesine (1) was from an Indonesian collection of the marine sponges Hyrtios erectus and H. reticulatus.1 The ??-carboline alkaloid was subsequently re-isolated from a Red Sea collection of Hyrtios sp. and found to display anti-phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity with an IC50 value of 14 ??M. Phospholipase A2 catalyses the hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids at the sn-2 position to generate arachidonic acids (AA).3,4 AA are precursors to a large family of compounds known as the eicosanoids associated with inflammatory reactions.4 PLA2 inhibition by hyrtiosulawesine would lead to a decrease in AA and proinflammatory eicosanoids, with anti-inflammatory effect.4 In an effort to understand the structural attributes of the natural product (1) that cause PLA2 inhibition, hyrtiosulawesine and a series of related model compounds (2, 3) will be synthesised and evaluated for biological activity. Biomimetic nucleophiles will be used to probe hyrtiosulawesine and related compounds in order to determine their reactivity and possible site of reaction. Bioactive members of the library of compounds will subsequently be subjected to reaction with bee venom phospholipase A2 to identify the presence of any covalent adducts. Further studies may be directed to discovering the nature and location of the covalent linkage within the enzyme active site. The latest results will be presented. References 1. Salmoun, M.; Devijver, C.; Daloze, D.; Braekman, J.-C.; Van Soest, R. W. M. J. Nat. Prod. 2002, 65, 1173-1176. 2. Sauleau, P.; Martin, M.-T.; Dau, M.-E. T. H.; Youssef, D. T. A.; Bourguet-Kondracki, M.-L. J. Nat. Prod. 2006, 69, 1676-1679. 3. Balsinde, J.; Balboa, M. A.; Insel, P. A.; Dennis, E. A. Annu. Rev. Pharmacol. Toxicol. 1999, 39, 175-189. 4. Parente, L. J. Rheumatol. 2001, 28, 2375-2382.

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  • Gorgeous Gallery: residential aged care in New Zealand, in pictures

    Broad, Joanna (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Co-Prescribing of Medications with Anticholinergic Properties to Those Using Cholinesterase Inhibitors for Dementia

    Garrigan, Katherine; John, N; McGrogan, A; Jones, R; de-Vries, C (2010-08)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Medications with anticholinergic (AC) propertieshave adverse effects on cognition and many guidelines recommend avoiding them in older adults. Theoretically they could negate benefits of cholinesterase inhibitor (CI) treatment in patients dementia patients, although there is inadequate evidence to date. Objectives: To determine the frequency of AC medicine use in patients treated with a CI and to assess whether such use is associated with early CI discontinuation. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was carried out using the General Practice Research Database. Subjectswere all patients aged 18+ with a new CI prescription after January 2000. All medicines were classified as to their AC properties according to the Rudolph Anticholinergic Risk Scale. AC medication use in patients prescribed CI was determined as well as CI discontinuation rates in those with and without AC medicines. Cox regression survival analysis with time dependent covariates was carried out to determine risk factors for CI discontinuation. Results: 7523 patients newly prescribed CIs were identified. On average, CIs were prescribed for 536 days; 50% of users had discontinued treatment 383 days after CI initiation;75% had discontinued by day 777. 3556 (47%) patients used CIs and AC medicines concomitantly; 1946 (26%) for over 90 days. Being underweight and frail were associated with a 12???15% higher risk of CI discontinuation. An association was found between concomitant AC use (especially antipsychotics) and discontinuation of CI but no association with the strength of AC action or cumulative exposure. Patients aged 80+ were significantly more likely to discontinue their CI early: HRadj 1.27 (CI951.13???1.43) in 80???84 year olds and 1.72 (CI951.53???1.93) in those aged 85+. Conclusions: Further work is needed to evaluate any association between CI discontinuation and cumulative AC exposure. Very elderly and underweight patients discontinued CIs earlier.

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