277 results for Conference poster

  • Pharmacy students: Personality Types, Professionalism and Decision Making

    Jensen, Maree; Ram, Sanyogita; Dhana, A; Ali, R; Goh, S; Sherif, B; Kwon, S; Elsedfy, Y; Russell, Bruce (2014-06-02)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Facebook?? use has become increasingly popular for pharmacy students. Recent debate about the ethical and professional principles pharmacy students possess when social networking online prompted this study. We aimed to identify links between personality types within the University of Auckland (UoA) pharmacy cohort, their activity on Facebook??, and their professional decision making skills.

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  • Bridging the Computational Modelling and EHR standards using openEHR and Semantic Web Technology

    Atalag, Koray; Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Cooling, Michael; Nickerson, David (2015-10-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Linking clinical data to computational physiology will enable real-world model validation as well as the possibility of personalised and population level predictive decision support tools. Electronic health records (EHR) embody quantifiable manifestations of genomic and environmental aspects that impact on biological systems when clinical data are structured. However data quality and semantic interoperability remains a major challenge in the world of EHRs. In the computational physiology domain recent attempts to enable semantic interoperability heavily rely on Semantic Web technologies and utilise ontology-based annotations (e.g. RICORDO) but a wealth of useful information and knowledge sits in EHRs where Semantic Web technologies have very limited use. openEHR provides a set of an open engineering specifications that provides a canonical health record architecture and open source tooling to support data collection and integration. Core openEHR specifications have also been adopted by ISO and CEN making it a full international standard which underpins many national programs and has multi-vendor implementations worldwide. Our work describes how to use openEHR to normalise, annotate and link clinical data with biophysical models by using openEHR Archetypes as semantic pointers to underlying clinical concepts in EHR.

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  • Investigation into the racemic X-ray structure of the antimicrobial protein snakin-1

    Yeung, Ho; Yosaatmadja, Yuliana; Squire, Christopher; Harris, Paul; Baker, Edward; Brimble, Margaret (2015-10-22)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Modelling NFAT Cycling Sensitivity in the Cardiac Myocyte

    Cooling, Michael; Hunter, Peter; Crampin, Edmund (2007-10-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The transcription factor NFAT acts as a signal integrator for a number of signal transduction pathways in cardiac myocytes that initiates gene expression in the disease Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy[1]. Here we develop a quantitative mathematical model of the cytoplasmicnuclear-cytoplasmic cycling of NFAT in response to calcium signals in the cardiac myocyte

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  • A case study on frontline perspectives of organizational change: A practitioner-academic partnership to analyse the creation of a Youth Justice entity in Child, Youth and Family

    Webster, Michael; Herrmann, Klaus (2009-11-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A frontline perspective of organizational change: Analyzing the creation of a Youth Justice entity in Child, Youth and Family using Lewin, Kotter & Schein's change management and organizational culture models

    Webster, Michael; Herrmann, K (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • 'Yes we can!': The emerging contribution of social work leadership to clinical governance and quality improvement in district health board mental health services

    McNabb, D; Webster, Michael (2009)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Where's the Sablefish?: Exploring causes of variable sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) representation in Northwest Coast sites

    Nims, Reno; Butler, V (2015-03)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The skeletal effects of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor nilotinib

    O'Sullivan, Susannah; Lin, Jian; Watson, M; Callon, K; Tong, PC; Naot, Dorit; Horne, Anne; Aati, O; Porteous, F; Gamble, G; Cornish, Jillian; Browett, Peter; Grey, Andrew (2011-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Learning styles and e-learning: Delivering knowledge and skills for health, human service and social work managers

    Webster, Michael (2009-03-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Diabetes Management by Primary Health Care Nurses in Auckland, New Zealand

    Daly, Barbara; Arroll, B; Sheridan, N; Kenealy, T; Scragg, R (2011-11-04)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Methods PHC nurses in Auckland (a 26% random sample) were asked to complete postal and telephone questionnaires (86% response rate), on education, experience, knowledge and diabetes management practice, and to log their care given to diabetes patients on a randomly selected day (n=265). Results Responses were received from 287 PHC nurses (86% response rate) comprising 210 practice nurses (PN), 49 district nurses (DN) and 28 specialist nurses (SNs). Most nurses (96%) were able to identify excess body weight as a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes and elevated blood glucose levels (BGLs) or glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) (86%) for diabetes-related complications. In contrast, CV risk factors were less well identified, particularly smoking, although more by SNs (43%) than PNs (14%) and DNs (12%, p=0.0005). CV complications, especially stroke, were less well known than microvascular complications, and by significantly fewer PNs (13%) and DNs (8%) than SNs (36%, p=0.002). Stronger associations were found between nurse???s knowledge of elevated HbA1c as a risk factor for diabetes-related complications and management activities related to BGLs and medication, compared with knowledge of CV risk factors, which was not associated with assessment of blood pressure or knowledge of patient???s total cholesterol or smoking status. The median number of patients consulted on the randomly selected day was one by 38% of PNs, two by 47% of DNs and 4-5 by 57% of SNs. Overall, PNs consulted almost 60% of the patients sampled, while patients consulted by DNs were older and more likely to be European New Zealanders, tobacco uses and have diabetes-related complications and co-morbidities, while SNs consulted by Maori and Pacific patients. Conclusion: There is a need for PHC nurses to increase their knowledge of CV risk factors with more effective management required and particularly of smoking.

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  • Palliative Care Experience, Education and Education Needs of Aged Residential Care Clinical Staff

    Frey, RA; Gott, M; Boyd, M; Robinson, J (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Pregnancy Associated Changes in Insulin Signalling in Daughters of Adolescent Ewes

    Oliver, Mark; Hancock, SN; Kenyon, PR; Blair, HT; Pain, S; Morris, S; Phua, Hui; Bloomfield, Francis (2011-09)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Estado nutricional de los ind??genas Patax?? de 5 aldeas de Minas Gerais, Brasil (Nutritional status of the indigenopus Pataxo from Minas Gerias, Brazil).

    Gontijo de Castro, Teresa; Oliveira, SNLG; Mazzetti, CMS; Conde, WL; Leite, MS; Pimenta, AM (2012-11-13)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introducci??n: En las ??ltimas d??cadas los estudios brasile??os sobre el estado nutricional no incluyeron la poblaci??n ind??gena como un segmento de an??lisis, generando brechas de informaciones para el direccionamiento de pol??ticas de alimentaci??n y nutrici??n para el grupo. Objetivo: Evaluar el estado nutricional de los ind??genas Patax?? de 5 aldeas de Minas Gerais. Metodolog??a: Estudio transversal que evalu?? 257 ind??genas (87,4% del total) en 2011. El peso y la altura fueran evaluados conforme las orientaciones de la OMS. La circunferencia de la cintura (CC) fue tomada en el punto medio entre la cresta il??aca y la ??ltima costilla. Las clasificaciones nutricionales fueron hechas a partir de los ??ndices altura para edad (A/E), ??ndice de masa corporal para edad (IMC/E), ??ndice de masa corporal (IMC) y CC, utilizando las referencias de la OMS y de Lipschitz (para ancianos). Resultados: Fueron evaluados 70 ni??os (27,3%), 59 adolescentes (23,0%), 116 adultos (45,0%) y 12 ancianos (4,7 %). Ninguno de los ni??os present?? d??ficit para A/E, 1,4% presentaron bajo IMC/E y 2,9% peso elevado para IMC/E. Fue observado d??ficit de altura en 3,4% de los adolescentes y peso excesivo (IMC/E) en 8,5%. Altas prevalencias de sobrepeso/obesidad y valores elevados de CC fueron apuntados para adultos (56,0% y 56,8 %, respectivamente) y ancianos (25,0% y 75%, respectivamente). Conclusi??n: Se destacan el exceso de peso en la poblaci??n de forma ascendente desde la ni??ez y la baja frecuencia de d??ficits nutricionales entre ni??os y adolescentes. Financiaci??n: Funda????o de Amparo ?? Pesquisa do Estado de Minas Gerais.

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  • What is known about the experience of CPAP for OSA from the users??? perspective? A systematic integrative literature review

    Ward, Kim; Gott, M (2013-10-29)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: The estimated economic, social and personal cost of untreated obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is high. Night time continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a recommended, cost effective and popular treatment. The predicted global increase in obesity will lead to increasing prevalence of OSA. Exploring management of CPAP from the user perspective is crucial to successful administration of this therapy. The objective was synthesis of the international evidence base regarding users??? experience of night time continuous positive airway pressure therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea. Materials and methods: A systematic integrative literature review was conducted and quality assessment criteria applied. Results: From 538 identified papers, 22 met inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis identified four themes: (1) evidence regarding experience of CPAP and issues of research design; (2) CPAP influenced by users??? views and beliefs; (3) CPAP investigated using a language of difficulty; and (4) spouse and family impact on CPAP use. Overall, research relating to user experience of CPAP is limited. Understanding is incomplete because of problems of study design, for example the use of pre-determined checklists and survey questions. The problem oriented terminology adopted by most studies is also likely to set up the expectation that users will encounter difficulties with CPAP. There is evidence that personality and attitude impact expectations about CPAP prior to and during use, whilst engagement of spouse, family and colleagues also influence experience. Conclusion: This comprehensive integrative review identified limited evidence about experiencing CPAP from the users??? perspective. Current research is constrained by researchers??? concern with non-compliance. Typically experiences of CPAP are not defined by the user, but from an ???expert??? healthcare perspective, using language that defines CPAP as problematic. Family and social support is a significant, but underexplored, element of experiencing CPAP and warrants further investigation. Research that more comprehensively involves CPAP users is required to determine how patients manage this therapy successfully.

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  • A synthetic study towards aryl 6,6-spiroacetal analogues of rubromycin

    Choi, Peter; Rathwell, DC; Brimble, Margaret (2008)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Annotation of Clinical Datasets Using openEHR Archetypes

    Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Atalag, Koray; De Bono, Bernard; Hunter, Peter (2015-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Variability in soil CO2 efflux across distinct urban land cover types

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2015-04-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    As a main source of greenhouse gases urban areas play an important role in the global carbon cycle. To assess the potential role of urban vegetation in mitigating carbon emissions we need information on the magnitude of biogenic CO2 emissions and its driving factors. We examined how urban land use types (urban forest, parklands, sportsfields) vary in their soil CO2 efflux.We measured soil CO2 efflux and its isotopic signature, soil temperature and soil moisture over a complete growing season in Auckland, New Zealand. Soil physical and chemical properties and vegetation characteristics were also measured. Mean soil CO2 efflux ranged from 4.15 to 12 molm 2 s 1.We did not find significant differences in soil CO2 efflux among land cover types due to high spatial variability in soil CO2 efflux among plots. Soil (soil carbon and nitrogen density, texture, soil carbon:nitrogen ratio) and vegetation characteristics (basal area, litter carbon density, grass biomass) were not significantly correlated with soil CO2 efflux. We found a distinct seasonal pattern with significantly higher soil CO2 efflux in autumn (Apr/May) and spring (Oct). In urban forests and sportsfields over 80% of the temporal variation was explained by soil temperature and soil water content. The 13C signature of CO2 respired from parklands and sportsfields (-20 permil - -25 permil) were more positive compared to forest plots (-29 permil) indicating that parkland and sportsfields had a considerable proportion of C4 grasses. Despite the large intra-urban variability, our results compare to values reported from other, often climatically different cities, supporting the hypothesis of homogenization across urban areas as a result of human management practices.

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  • CO2 Fluxes and Concentrations in a Residential Area in the Southern Hemisphere

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Turnbull, JC; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2014-12-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    While cities are generally major sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, recent research has shown that parts of urban areas may also act as CO2 sinks due to CO2 uptake by vegetation. However, currently available results are related to a large degree of uncertainty due to the limitations of the applied methods and the limited number of studies available from urban areas, particularly from the southern hemisphere. In this study, we explore the potential of eddy covariance and tracer measurements (13C and 14C isotopes of CO2) to quantify and partition CO2 fluxes and concentrations in a residential urban area in Auckland, New Zealand. Based on preliminary results from autumn and winter (March to July 2014) the residential area is a small source of CO2 (0.11 mol CO2 m-2 day-1). CO2 fluxes and concentrations follow a distinct diurnal cycle with a morning peak between 7:00 and 9:00 (max: 0.25 mol CO2 m-2 day-1/412 ppm) and midday low with negative CO2 fluxes (min: -0.17 mol CO2 m-2 day-1/392 ppm) between 10:00 and 15:00 local time, likely due to photosynthetic CO2 uptake by local vegetation. Soil CO2 efflux may explain that CO2 concentrations increase and remain high (401 ppm) throughout the night. Mean diurnal winter delta13C values are in anti-phase with CO2 concentrations and vary between -9.0 - -9.70/00. The depletion of delta13C compared to clean atmospheric air (-8.20/00) is likely a result of local CO2 sources dominated by gasoline combustion (appr. 60%) during daytime. A sector analysis (based on prevailing wind) of CO2 fluxes and concentrations indicates lower CO2 fluxes and concentrations from the vegetation-dominated sector, further demonstrating the influence of vegetation on local CO2 concentrations. These results provide an insight into the temporal and spatial variability CO2 fluxes/concentrations and potential CO2 sinks and sources from a city in the southern hemisphere and add valuable information to the global database of urban CO2 fluxes.

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  • The potential of urban forests to mitigate atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Weissert, Lena; Salmond, Jennifer; Schwendenmann, Luitgard (2013)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The urban population in New Zealand is expected to increase significantly over the next years. Urban areas are generally large sources of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However, attempts to quantify atmospheric CO2 concentrations and fluxes have suggested that densily vegetated urban areas may absorb sufficient quantities of anthropogenic CO2 to act as a local sink. Consequently, urban greening programs now form an important part of many urban climate change mitigation policies globally as well as in New Zealand. However, knowledge about the direct contribution of urban vegetation on atmospheric CO2 concentrations is still limited and measurements scarce. This paper examines the methods used to date to estimate / measure carbon pools and CO2 fluxes from urban vegetation and soils (collectively known as urban forests) and aggregates currently available results. Results from the northern hemisphere show that carbon pools in urban forests were comparable to 3 ??? 60% of the annually released fossil fuel emissions, while photosynthetic uptake accounted for 0.3 ??? 2.6% of the total estimated emissions in urban areas. Whilst vegetation did not offset CO2 emissions on an annual basis in these scenarios, vegetative CO2 uptake resulted in significantly lower atmospheric CO2 concentrations in summer. However, the currently available results are related to a large degree of uncertainty due to the limitations of the applied methods, the limited number of urban areas studied and the temporal / spatial resolution of the fieldwork. This paper demonstrates that in order to effectively quantify and encorporate carbon fluxes from urban areas into annual CO2 budgets, future research needs to use a combination of methodologies and be aware of the scales of their studies. Thus, before investing in urban greening programs the potential of urban vegetation as a climate change mitigation measure needs to be further investigated, particularly for cities in the southern hemisphere.

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