265 results for Conference poster

  • Modelling of Gas Hydrate Dissociation During The Glacial-Inter-glacial Cycles, Case Study The Chatham Rise, New Zealand

    Oluwunmi, Paul; Pecher, Ingo; Archer, Rosalind; Moridis, GJ; Reagan, MT (2015-12-15)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Empirical liquefaction-induced lateral displacements relationship using Lidar data of the Canterbury earthquake sequence

    Wu, C; Orense, Rolando (2016-04-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A trial of image-based dietary records to monitor intake and improve dietary habits, knowledge and behaviours in elite athletes

    Gemming, L; Simpson, A; Braakhuis, Andrea (2017-06-07)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • What is known about the experience of CPAP for OSA from the users’ perspective? A systematic integrative literature review

    Ward, Kim; Gott, M (2013-10-29)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction: The estimated economic, social and personal cost of untreated obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is high. Night time continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a recommended, cost effective and popular treatment. The predicted global increase in obesity will lead to increasing prevalence of OSA. Exploring management of CPAP from the user perspective is crucial to successful administration of this therapy. The objective was synthesis of the international evidence base regarding users’ experience of night time continuous positive airway pressure therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea. Materials and methods: A systematic integrative literature review was conducted and quality assessment criteria applied. Results: From 538 identified papers, 22 met inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis identified four themes: (1) evidence regarding experience of CPAP and issues of research design; (2) CPAP influenced by users’ views and beliefs; (3) CPAP investigated using a language of difficulty; and (4) spouse and family impact on CPAP use. Overall, research relating to user experience of CPAP is limited. Understanding is incomplete because of problems of study design, for example the use of pre-determined checklists and survey questions. The problem oriented terminology adopted by most studies is also likely to set up the expectation that users will encounter difficulties with CPAP. There is evidence that personality and attitude impact expectations about CPAP prior to and during use, whilst engagement of spouse, family and colleagues also influence experience. Conclusion: This comprehensive integrative review identified limited evidence about experiencing CPAP from the users’ perspective. Current research is constrained by researchers’ concern with non-compliance. Typically experiences of CPAP are not defined by the user, but from an ‘expert’ healthcare perspective, using language that defines CPAP as problematic. Family and social support is a significant, but underexplored, element of experiencing CPAP and warrants further investigation. Research that more comprehensively involves CPAP users is required to determine how patients manage this therapy successfully.

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  • What should be stored in Biobanks? Using computational modelling to unravel genotype to phenotype linkage

    Cooling, Michael; Atalag, Koray (2016-10-31)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Human Activities Modify Bacterial Diversity in Stream Benthic Biofilm Communities

    Lewis, Gillian; Roberts, Kelly; Turner, Susan; Lear, Gavin (2008-06-01)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study tests the hypothesis that human impact is an important driver of stream biofilm bacterial population diversity. The seasonal bacterial composition of biofilm in 4 streams with different levels of human impact was determined over 2 years. Bacterial diversity derived from 16S rDNA clone libraries, shows both between stream differences and seasonal transitions in bacterial occurrence and population dominance at a class and genus level. Diversity analysis calculated on pooled seasonal data (class level identification) shows that while composition of the populations are different there is a similar level of both bacterial richness and bacterial diversity in each stream. Trends in bacterial occurrence suggest that the most degraded stream were dominated by cyanobacteria, the mid range impact streams by aeromonads and gamma proteobacteria, while the unimpacted stream showed both high diversity and no dominance by any particular class.

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  • Children who learn in more than one language in Aotearoa/New Zealand: New challenges and research processes

    Harvey, Nola; Podmore, Valerie; Hedges, Helen; Keegan, Peter; Mara, D; Lee, Jennifer; Tuafuti, P (2013-11)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Demographic evidence indicates that learners in Aotearoa-New Zealand are increasingly likely to speak more than one language and that this is most evident in the Auckland region. These trends suggest emerging challenges for researchers and practitioners. This poster presents our TLRI* research, in progress, which documents the diversity of language use and experiences of children in early childhood education and care in the Auckland region. The collaborative research team includes University of Auckland researchers and teacherresearchers in four early childhood centres: a Māori-medium centre, a Samoan immersion centre, and a kindergarten and a centre with children from a wide range of heritage language backgrounds. Theoretical frameworks influencing the design and analyses include an additive approach to bilingual activity and contexts that views children as potentially capable. The research (2013-2015) addresses three questions: 1. What languages do children from participating ECE centres use in their learning in the centre and at home? 2. What experiences and outcomes for children who learn in more than one language in the early years are valued by parents, teachers, and children? 3. How might the opportunities and challenges for children who learn in more than one language be addressed in educational practice? Objectives within each of the four partner-centre settings are to: · document the languages spoken by children, parents, and teachers in the ECE centre and at home · document and interpret the learning experiences of young children who learn in more than one language (as valued by parents, teachers, and children) · document the valued outcomes for young children who learn in more than one language · in partnership between teacher-researchers and University of Auckland researchers, analyse and theorise the data gathered, using funds of knowledge and additive bilingualism approaches, to build on understandings of the learning and teaching of children who learn in more than one language, and · analyse and theorise, using an 'additive approach' (to bilingualism, immersion, or multi-literacies), to extend understandings of the learning and teaching of children who learn in more than one language.) Research team members are using a range of qualitative and quantitative approaches to generate data about the experiences, opportunities, and challenges associated with learning in more than one language. Methods/tools include: questionnaires for parents and teachers, focus group interviews with parents and teachers, and fieldnote observations of arrivals and departures at the centres, videotaped observations of children's learning experiences in ECE settings, and conversations with children. In the poster session, aspects of these processes will be discussed. This research is significant, given the demographics and that there are gaps in current knowledge about learning experiences, valued outcomes and possible futures for children who are learning in more than one language in their ECE and (or) their family environments. Our study is designed to contribute new findings and to advance knowledge and practice about children learning in more than one language in the early years.

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  • Gorgeous Gallery: residential aged care in New Zealand, in pictures

    Broad, Joanna (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Duration of intravenous antibiotics post-operatively in complicated appendicitis: is there a difference in complication rates?

    Chung, L; Paterson, J; Devathasan, J; MacCormick, Andrew (2017)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Clinical prediction rules for appendicitis in adults: Which is best?

    Kularatna, M; Lauti, Melanie; Haran, C; MacFater, W; Sheikh, L; Huang, Y; McCall, J; MacCormick, Andrew (2017)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Bridging Computational Modelling and Clinical Information using openEHR and Semantic Web

    Atalag, Koray; Zivaljevic, Aleksandar; Kalbasi, R; Cooling, Michael; Nickerson, David; Hunter, Peter (2016-02-19)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Linking clinical data to computational physiology is a crucial step for personalised and predictive Medicine. Electronic health records (EHR) embody quantifiable manifestations of genetic and environmental effects that impact on biological systems. Recent attempts to enable this linkage heavily rely on semantic technologies however in the world of EHRs Semantic Web has very limited use. openEHR provides open engineering specifications and tooling to tackle health data which supports Semantic Web. We are setting up an openEHR-based research data repository at ABI to normalise and annotate clinical and experimental data with an aim to integrate with the Physiome Model Repository (PMR).

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  • Methodology to set up minimum pasteurisation conditions for high acid shelf-stable foods

    Oliveira, Maria; Gibbs, PA (2007-11-14)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Critical transitions in the public space of contemporary Chinese cities: Evaluating the “otherness” of the malls of consumption and spectacle in Changsha

    Manfredini, Manfredo; Xin, T; Wei, C (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New technologies, social media and spatial representations: Auckland’s public space of spectacle and consumption

    Manfredini, Manfredo; Jenner, Gordon (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The virtual public thing: Or about the res publica in the post-consumerist society

    Manfredini, Manfredo; Jenner, R (2015)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Relationship Between University Student Motivation, Beliefs and Approaches to Learning and Local and Global Achievement

    Hamilton, Richard; Peterson, Elizabeth (2017-05-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    The ways students approach a given learning task, their beliefs about what learning is, and their learning goals and motivation have all been argued to be important for academic achievement. To date most of these different components of learning have largely been studied in isolation and there is a dearth of research which includes all these factors and their relationship to learning outcomes within the tertiary sector This information is crucial to expanding researchers’ understanding of how these factors relate to university student achievement and to advance our knowledge of how best to facilitate higher levels of achievement within this population. The aim of the present study was to firstly develop a measurement model of the different approaches, goals and beliefs about learning and secondly to validate this model by exploring it’s relationship with local and global achievement within a tertiary sector context.

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  • Pretraining effects on cognitive load in authentic settings when learning complex science ideas?

    Haslam, C; Hamilton, Richard (2015-08-27)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    High cognitive load is often a consequence of learning complex ideas in science. One approach to reducing cognitive load when learning complex material is ìpretrainingî which involves the presentation of the information essential for understanding the concepts in two stages: Stage 1 - present names and characteristics of the main parts or ideas to provide the learners with some prior knowledge but no understanding of the concepts; Stage 2 - present material required for full understanding of the concepts. This study assessed the impact of pretraining on the efficiency of learning of basic graphing skills and complex physics concepts within actual classrooms. 495 students participated in this study and were given either pretraining and a power-point presentation, just the power-point presentation, or the power-point presentation twice. The pretraining group reported lower subjective cognitive load scores, greater improvement from pre to posttest and greater efficiency in learning (i.e., effective use of mental effort while learning) than the other two treatments. This supports the usefulness of pretraining as a strategy to reduce cognitive load and enhance learning within authentic settings.

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  • Evidence for the intensive-exposure and cross-sex transmission hypotheses in epidemic poliomyelitis mortality patterns in southern Ontario, 1910–1937

    Battles, Heather (2013-04-12)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Poliomyelitis was a major emerging epidemic disease in the early 20th century, and models of its epidemiology continue to be revised. Nielsen and colleagues have recently presented two new hypotheses: 1) that polio severity is related to intensity of exposure, creating a U-shaped age curve rather than a linear increase in severity with age, and 2) that polio severity increases when transmission occurs between opposite sexes, and therefore the sex ratio in severe polio cases will be more equal when family sizes are larger. Data for polio deaths in Ontario’s Wentworth and York Counties from 1900-1937 were gathered from a variety of archival sources, including birth, marriage, and death registrations and census records, and entered into an Excel database. Analysis of mortality patterns in this sample revealed two distinct stages within the study period, discussed in part here. Stage One (1910 to 1927) is characterized by an equal sex ratio and a median known family size of 4. Stage Two (1928 to 1937) is characterized by excess male deaths and a median known family size of 2. For 1910-1937 inclusive, the sex ratio for ages 0-19 was 2.6 in families of 1-2 children and 0.9 in families of ≥3 children. A U-shaped age curve was observed in the 1928-1937 period, with a dip at ages 7-8, but not in 1910-1927. These results support Nielsen and colleagues’ cross-sex transmission hypothesis and intensive-exposure model, tying polio mortality patterns to demographic shifts in the early 20th century and indicating further research is warranted. This research was supported by funding from SSHRC (Canada Graduate Scholarship), OGS (Ontario Graduate Scholarship), and McMaster University Department of Anthropology.

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  • Postmortem violence? Identifying and interpreting postmortem disturbance in Mongolia

    Littleton, Judith; Frohlich, B (2011)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Deliberate violence to remains can be inflicted post-mortem but archaeologically distinguishing the source of disturbance is hard enough while interpreting motive may be impossible. We present the results of excavation of 37 Bronze Age mounds, northernMongolia. Based on detailed analysis of burial structure, patterns of articulation, damage to elements and movement of bones within and outside the burial space, we argue there is evidence of human activity distinguishable from that of animals. Alternative hypotheses of disturbance incidental to robbery versus intentional post-mortem violence are evaluated in the context of the graves themselves, the archaeological context and ethnographic studies.

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  • The Effects of a Vitamin D, Omega 3, Co-enzyme Q10, Zeaxanthin, Lutein and Astaxanthin Supplement (Lester’s Oil) on Healthy People: Preliminary Results.

    Laing, Bobbi; Ellett, S; Marlow, G; Han, Dug; Jesuthasan, A; Ferguson, Lynnette (2014-08-25)

    Conference poster
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Diet is a key component in the disease susceptibility of individuals. Reducing inflammation especially in people with inflammatory disorders is thought to decrease disease susceptibility. The aim of this trial was to investigate the effects of a dietary supplement which contains Vitamin D, Omega 3, Co-enzyme Q10, Zeaxanthin, Lutein and Astaxanthion inflammatory markers in healthy people. Methods: The cross over trial was double blinded, randomised and placebo controlled. The study population (n = 30) was recruited from Auckland, New Zealand. The intervention or placebo was for 28 days, followed by a washout of 28 days followed by the placebo or intervention for 28 days. In this preliminary analysis blood samples were measured for C-Reactive protein (CRP), HDL, LDL, Triglycerides and cholesterol levels. A quality of life questionnaire, height and weight were also assessed. Results: Analysis of these measures found significant differences between the intervention and placebo groups for CRP (p < 0.0288) HDL (p < 0.0019) and triglycerides (p < 0.0091). Conclusion: In this preliminary analysis the supplement was shown to be effective in reducing key inflammatory markers in healthy people.

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