8 results for Creative work, 2017

  • Kammermusikfest Hopfgarten 2016 Eine europ??ische reise der Kammermusik

    Salzmann, E; Jaffe, R; Schellenberger, H (2017-06-01)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Design and research: Shared territories

    Chatterjee, A; Macken, M; Fischer, T (2017-08-17)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Design Research Institute at Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University (XJTLU) in Suzhou, China is organising its inaugural exhibition Design and Research: Shared Territories (28 October ??? 11 November 2014). The exhibition is curated by academics at XJTLU - Dr Anuradha Chatterjee, Dr Marian Macken and Dr Thomas Fischer. The exhibition features peer reviewed, mixed media contributions by scholars, academics and designers from Australia, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Finland, United States, United Kingdom, and of course China, from interdisciplinary fields of architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, fine art, industrial design, biological sciences, and language. Design and Research: Shared Territories explores two themes: Inquiring Inquiry and Research as Design. The aim is to inquire and expose, rather than present a known/given view of design research. To this end, the exhibition is approached as a form of scholarship, offering a productive space for creating new ways of knowing and critical insights into existing ways of knowing. Information on exhibition venue and opening times will be posted soon. Please save the date if you are in China and wish to attend.

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  • Boundless: Printmaking beyond the frame

    Allender, R; Hutchins-Pond, M; Allen, B (2017-08-21)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Parts, Fillings, Cuttings is one of a series of experimental works positioned at the boundaries of contemporary printmaking. As the title implies, it was constructed using a combination of techniques from the traditions of chine collé, wood inlay and painting. It was also produced collaboratively, as part of an artistic partnership between Rick Allender and Nuala Gregory. Allender specialises in contemporary marquetry, employing wood veneers. Gregory has been integrating chine collé and lithography since 2009. Among the material and aesthetic influences on these works are Eastern lacquer effects, with their heightened colours, depth and luminosity, and the predella formats of 16th Century European altarpieces and ceilings with their contrasts of style and assemblages of parts. Above all, the works are distinguished by an underlying emphasis on construction and the unforced emergence of form and meaning. Allender draws on his love of the natural world, particularly forests and the sea, and the need for their protection and preservation. Gregory’s practice focuses on the sensuous particularities to be encountered in everyday experiences. By pushing at the limits of traditional mediums, these works provide an indication of what might yet be possible, what might yet emerge and flourish in our world, with our care and thoughtful participation.

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  • Gioachino Rossini: La Cenerentola: Ossia la bont?? in trionfo

    Spinosi, JC; Bartoli, C (2017-10-30)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Gioachino Rossini: La Cenerentola

    Spinosi, JC; Bartoli, C (2017-11-02)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Spinosi, J.C. (conductor), Bartoli, C. (Soloist, Artistic Director), Ensemble Matheus (orchestra), Wiener Staatsopernchor (Vienna State Opera Chorus)

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  • The North Belfast Community Leadership Awards [Flax Trust Concert]

    Evans, Tecwyn (2017-11-20)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Evans, T.H.D. (Conductor)

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  • Future Islands: NZIA at the Venice Biennale

    Walker, C; Waghorn, Kathy (2017-11-20)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The opening exhibition for the Objectspace re-launch is Future Islands, which was New Zealand???s exhibition at the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale. The exhibition is about the practice and promise of architecture in this country ??? a small, open society that is diverse, changing and economically (and seismically) vulnerable. In the exhibition, a grouping of floating forms ??? light, tough shells fabricated by a boat-building company ??? occupy a sea of space. Models of more than 50 architectural projects are arranged on or near, these ???islands???. Some projects sit provisionally on their sites; others seem to have been shaken free of their foundations altogether. Future Islands is designed as a navigational experience: it is designed to be moved through. Visitors are free to make their own inter-island connections ??? there???s no prescribed route. The exhibition is not didactic, but it does make a case for the heterogeneity of architectural practice in New Zealand, and the unsettled state of contemporary architecture, generally. With its untethered and even upside-down models, Future Islands has some fun with the commonplace assertion in New Zealand architecture that buildings arise ???naturally??? from the landscape. The exhibition, optimistically, makes the case for architectural exploration. It includes projects at very different scales, from large social and educational buildings by New Zealand???s biggest architectural firms to tiny structures designed and built by recent graduates. There is a strong strain of inventiveness running through the exhibition: many of the projects manifest a desire to create alternative forms of practice, to be entrepreneurial, to think of new ways to do ???architecture???. The exhibition???s ???islands??? are a play upon New Zealand???s insular condition, but they also allude to the rich literary and scientific narratives of islands as sites of possibility ??? as places of uninhibited or necessary social experiment, or incubators of evolutionary development. Accordingly, Future Islands includes many unbuilt and purely speculative projects. The exhibition seeks to provide many perspectives on the one place. In this, it draws inspiration from one narrative in particular: Italo Calvino???s allegorical novel Invisible Cities, in which the Venetian merchant adventurer Marco Polo entrances Kublai Khan with stories of wondrous places he has encountered. All these places, it turns out, are the same place ??? Polo???s own city. This narrative device resonated with our exhibition purpose. What better way to present our architecture in Venice? The projects on the archipelago of Future Islands ??? whether real or imagined, they???re all stories about this place. Objectspace is Aotearoa/New Zealand???s leading gallery dedicated to the fields of design, craft and architecture. It seeks to invigorate exhibition making, support discourse in these fields, and provide a wealth of opportunities to engage and expand knowledge of material cultures.

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  • The Demon Machine

    Brown, Carol; Kinder, J; Mayer, LM; Bodenwieser, G; Grayling, J (2017-11-20)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Demon Machine (1924) is an iconic work of modern dance created by the Viennese choreographer Gertrud Bodenwieser. Expressing the anxieties of the machine age during the Weimar era, it explores the potential for machines to dehumanise and colonise bodies. This modern dance work toured Australia for nearly two decades beginning in 1939. For the National Gallery Victoria's event 'Dancing Sculpture' as part of the Brave New World exhibition celebrating artists of the 1930s, I recreated the choreography with five Victoria College Australia dancers. The performance recreation is based on reconstructions by Shona Dunlop-MacTavish for Dunedin Dance Theatre (1980); and Bettina Vernon and Evelyn Ippen for Dance Studies, University of Surrey (1988).

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