275 results for Creative work

  • Aarero Stone - Two Solos in a Performance Landscape

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Koronheo, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    How do we care for the strangely familiar and mourn the distant dead? The solo performance, Aarero Stone (2006) grew out of collaborative research into mythologies of stone and narratives of embodiment which express grief. European and Maori expressions of grief embodied in stone were researched through workshops in New Zealand and London. Through this research, processes of metamorphosis as embedded in mythology, geology and in digital processes were explored as a way to better understand and inhabit the changes we are experiencing in a new world order of global communications and terrorism. This enquiry followed a perceived shift in relations of meaning within art processes from metaphor to metamorphosis. Inspired by mentor, Marina Warner, I sought to explore metamorphosis as an energy and defining dynamic for change and transformation. The resulting choreography was described as 'spellbinding...an austere pageant of dance poetry...tragic, bold and clandestine.??? The Listener Dec 2007.

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  • Seaunsea : An Interactive Performance

    Brown, Carol; Ramsgard-Thomsen, M; MacDonald, A; Mannion, M; Mottram, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography and Artistic Direction - Carol Brown Architecture and Interactive Design - Mette Ramsgard Thomsen Sound Design - Alastair MacDonald Programming - Chiron Mottram Lighting Design - Michael Mannion Premiered Dance Umbrella London, SeaUnSea was an evolving interactive performance for three dancers moving in response to and affecting a virtual seascape.Core to its development was the making of an intuitive interface through which the dancers could affect and respond to the digital scenography. Using a camera interface, mounted above the stage, the dancers are seen by a swarm of intelligent agents that navigate their way through a virtual space. The agents can be understood as a swarm of digital beings that interact with each other as well as react to changes in their environment. As they seek to navigate the plane, drawn by defined points of attraction, they are hindered by shades of darkness (the dancers digital shadow). In this way ???the agents??? encounter the performers, at times evading, at times following and at other times being curious about their presence. The digital agents form vivid colour fields, assembling and dissolving creating cloud-like patterns around the performer/participant.Other artists exploring particle streams to extend the trace-form of the dancer include Trisha Brown, however this research as developed in SeaUnSea is original in its extension of this technology through the layering of a mesh architecture which embeds the time-based trace of the dancers??? presence.

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  • REVOLVE An interactive performance

    Brown, Carol; Niemetz, A; Gander, P; Medlin, M; Scoones, R

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Co-conceived by Carol Brown and Anne Niemetz; dancing, choreography, spoken text and performance elements authored by Carol Brown; Anne Niemetz designed the wearable technology, interface system and filmed and edited the video compoent; Russell Scoones developed the recorded soundscape; Philippa Gander contributed expertise as a sleep scientist and co-researcher in the developmental stages of the project dramaturgy; Margie Medlin was responsible for the overall lighting design and related performance elements; additional contributors included Fiona Graham and Alys Longley who contributed to the development of the performance texts. REVOLVE is a real-time interactive performance that sheds light on the ???stuff??? dreams are made of, the night-stories and bodily states that shape our sleeping hours. As an arts-science collaboration, the research imperative was to translate the data of a sleep scientist into sonic and choreographic content through wearable technologies. The work invites audiences to experience a series of states enfolding voice, sound, light, video and dance, as she metaphorically traces the path of the sleeper???s mind and body from dusk to dawn. Driven by a curiosity about the body, its rhythms and potential for change, the work alludes to the planetary, physiological and personal cycles that round our lives. In doing so, it explores how the non-literalness of scientific phenomena (data from EEG readings of brain waves) can be mapped through interactive performance and made meaningful as a series of performative states for audiences. The performance ecology enfolds wearable electronic sensor technology, video, lighting, text, recorded sound and an interactive sound environment within a choreographic score. Sensing the body, its gestures and its environment through the measurement of light, tilt and acceleration, Carol Brown wears a ???sensor suit??? that allows her to intuitively control and interact with a malleable sound environment. She can respond to this environment by choosing to expose or hide light-sensitive parts of her body and combining these actions with movements of varied speed. In turn, the sonic feedback influences the emerging choreographic score, inducing constraints and generative cyclic patterns for movement. The dramaturgy is driven by concepts based on the physiological cycles that underlie sleeping and waking, which are in turn shaped by our circadian biological clock that keeps our sleep/wake cycle coordinated with the rotation of the earth. REVOLVE includes scenes that are inspired by states such as light sleep ??? delving in and out of wakefulness; deep sleep ??? a state in which the brain???s neuronal activity synchs up to create very slow and large brainwaves; and REM sleep ??? a state characterised by nervous muscle twitches and rapid eye movements that come from an active, but sleeping brain. At the end of the performance there is a metaphorical breech into waking consciousness as the brain re-engages with the external world through purposeful and directed movement. The sound design is partially composed, and partially interactive. The composed sounds are sourced from EEG brainwaves, recordings of a sleeping child and the voice of tenor Keith Lewis. The interactive sounds are based on the auditory beat, a phenomenon that arises when two pure tones of different, but neighbouring frequencies are played together. In such a situation, a beat frequency emerges, perceived as a periodic pulsing of the sound. These beats ??? waves of sound - are powerful to listen to, physically moving, subsonic but clearly perceivable.

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  • 1000 Lovers

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Graham, F

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography - Carol Brown Design - Dorita Hannah Sound - Russell Scoones Dramaturgy - Fiona Graham Producer - Maximus Smitheram 1000 LOVERS is a performance that moves from sea to city through Auckland???s Wynyard Quarter. A cast of mythical characters ??? Tuna (an eel-man), Hine (his lover), a bride, a widow, and an urban tribe lead this journey. 1000 LOVERS draws its title from Auckland's M??ori name T??maki Makaurau, which translates not only as 'Isthmus of one thousand lovers', but may also be understood as 'T??maki-the bride sought by a hundred suitors'. By re-enacting mythical, historical and everyday stories through music, design and dance the performance reveals hidden narratives and forgotten sites within this urban landscape. 1000 LOVERS follows a walkable route over a 50-minute timeframe, starting at Silo Park and ending on the steps of Karanga Plaza. The sound score provides an additional sensory layer to enhance this experience.

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  • out the window breath bone feather

    Brown, Carol; Whitehead, G; Graham, F

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreographer Carol Brown Composer Gillian Whitehead Dramaturg Fiona Graham Design Kasia Pol Photographer Solomon Mortimer 'out the window breath bone feather' draws on the extraordinarily rich history of the Pah Homestead since its establishment in 1877, with its changing residents including landed gentry, servants, orphans, nuns, immigrants and broken families, acknowledging as well the prehistory and the site of the pre-European Whataroa Pah. 'out the window breath bone feather' approached collaboratively, explores the memories and stories that resonate through the house and landscape.

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  • FLOOD in NZPQ15: ??hua o te Rangi, Prague Quadrennial of Performance Design and Space International Exhibition of Countries and Regions

    Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Erceg, L; Brown, Carol

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography by Carol Brown; performance design by Dorita Hannah; sound design by Russell Scoones; sculptural objects by Linda Erceg. Influenced by Maori and Pacific sacred places (marae), the Ahua o Te Rangi installation serves as an interaction, negotiation and display space that operates as an architecture piece, audiovisual media-site, live performance stage and dialogue exchange platform. FLOOD, the live performance, is re-presented within the exhibition through a video installation and sculptural form.

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  • Any coloured thing: solo exhibition

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Any Coloured Thing, is an exhibition by Nuala Gregory that explores how colour and sensation can influence our understanding of objects. Gregory???s work draws on her investigations into painting, printmaking, collage and colour, advancing the proposition that art can produce effects which escape the bounds of representation and operate instead at the level of bodily sensation. In her writing she explores ideas on contemporary painting as follows: ???Post-medium and post-conceptual theories of art suggest that painting is not so much dead as posthumous, enduring an unending afterlife. Its achievement is certain but insufficiently understood, and so it lingers on (as embarrassment, enigma, or happy commodity) in the digital age. ???

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  • Raum(er)greifend | Ordnung ??? Unruhe

    Ingram, SA; Bogner, AM

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Gioachino Rossini: La Cenerentola: Ossia la bont?? in trionfo

    Spinosi, JC; Bartoli, C (2017-10-30)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Akademie f??r Alte Musik Berlin

    Ross, April; Ponseele, M; Salar-Verdu, T; Wieringa, E; Beuse, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Tony and His Mirror: Transformer Remix

    Harvey, Mark

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Video installed through Data Projection, Visualizing Trans, Exhibition, International Exhibition, Curated by Tamar Brown, Heidi Ganshaw, Chele Isaac, Megan Katz, Amy Noell, Emily Pfotenhauer, Sara Schneckloth, Beth Zinsli, Trans Conference

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  • J.S. Bach in the Italian Style (JH Tibbles, harpsichord) [CD recording]

    Tibbles, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Harpsichord music by J.S. Bach, performed on the Paul Downie copy of Christian Zell 1728 double manual harpsichord

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  • Wrap Me Up, Make Me Happy: Quality Control Remix II

    Harvey, Mark

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Troupe

    Harvey, Mark

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • North German Organ Music [CD recording]

    Tibbles, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Recording on Ahrend Organ, Monash University, Melbourne

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  • Vivaldi, A. Cello Sonatas Nos. 1-6 (with versions by L. Dallapiccola) (JH Tibbles, harpsichord) [CD recording]

    Tibbles, James; Rummel, M

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Sesquialtera [CD recording]

    Tibbles, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Programme notes on the history of early English chamber organs, and on the Avery organ, by James Tibbles; "detailed information on the organ, including documentation on its restoration, registrations of the works on this CD and aspects of performance practice, is available on the Age of Discovery website

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  • The Fluid City, a work as part of the Rosebank Art Walk, Auckland Arts Festival

    Waghorn, Kathy; Longley, Alys; Brown, C; Brierley, Gary; Fitzpatrick, Katrina; Sunde, Charlotte; Ehlers, C; Martin, Rosemary; Wood, Rebecca

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    collaborative research project funded through Transforming Cities The Fluid City project was initiated through a Transforming Cities research grant at the University of Auckland to promote inter-disciplinary urban research for sustainable futures. The premise of Fluid City is that the arts can play an important role in communicating issues of sustainability in novel ways that capture public imagination and provoke alternative understandings and visions of the city. Our motive for undertaking this collaboration was to produce new ways of disseminating hard science knowledge concerning the effects of the urban realm on fresh water catchments and the harbours with the diverse publics of Auckland. Our response then was to generate a mechanism to support a fluid approach to the sharing and exchange of water knowledge and to make a space for the close encounter with water from our urban streams, creeks and rivers.The Fluid City project is anchor-less and mobile, taking the form of three strange, translucent cupboard-like structures each towed by bicycle. Like a stream the bicycle powered Fluid City winds its way through the city???s streets, creating a sense of anticipation and wonder. It then temporarily occupies an urban space and garners the unsuspecting public as audience. The three cupboards open, releasing images, objects, performance, and between them creating a space to pause in the city. Each cupboard and its yellow-aproned attendant invites the passer-by to engage with water; to view, through a diver???s mask, a film showing the passage of water through the city; to don a lab coat and guided by a microbiologist see the usually invisible microbial universe of the city???s waterways, active, alive and full of creatures; to sit on an upturned bucket and listen through headphones to different voices sharing stories and knowledge of the city???s fluid states; to pick up a pen and write or draw your own memories and concerns about water on postcards and contribute this writing to a gently flapping washing line of thoughts; to follow characters through a dance and audio performance evoking the invisible stories of a reclaimed harbour through movement, poetry and sound. In 2013 the Fluid City project was invited to be part of the Rosebank Project (Auckland Arts Festival) which began with the premise that through a better knowledge of place, communities grow and that culture is the mechanism by which this occurs. The project was centered in the industrial precinct and suburban area of Rosebank Rd in Auckland, New Zealand, built over an estuarine peninsula of significant ecological worth and geological interest; the site of the oldest market gardens in Auckland. The Fluid City was adapted to work with the specific estuarine conditions of this local and was operational over the weekend of March 23-24, alongside the work of twenty-five designers, artists and collectives. The Rosebank Project was conceived and curated by Marcus Williams.

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  • Trinity - J.S. Bach Soprano Arias

    Grodd, Uwe

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Uwe Grodd performer and Executive Producer, and others performers

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  • Andrea Zani: Complete cello concertos

    Rummel, Martin

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Martin Rummel (cello soloist), K??lner Akademie (orchestra), Michael Alexander Willens (conductor) This recording was awarded the "Pizzicato Supersonic Award", the "American Record Guide Critics Choice" award and was listed on the Fanfare "Want List" as well as nominated for an ICMA award.

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