263 results for Creative work

  • FLUTE FEST CONCERT; Uwe Grodd, performer and conductor flute choir; Schubert 'Staendchen', Hiroshi 'Ocean'

    Grodd, Uwe

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Flautist and Conductor Final concert of flute Fest '16 including a flute choir of 16 players

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  • Witnessing Parihaka

    Matthews, Stephen; Sullivan, R (2011)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stephen Matthews - Composer Robert Sullivan - Poet Auckland Readers and Writers Festival 2011

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  • Doggerel for bass flute

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (2015-11)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Eve de Castro-Robinson: composer

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  • These arms to hold you: for children's voices and orchestra; text by Bill Manhire

    de Castro-Robinson, EK; Manhire, W (2007)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Composer a work for orchestra and children's voices commissioned for the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra by the Royal NZ Plunket Society to celebrate its 100th anniversary. A collaboration with poet Bill Manhire from Victoria University.

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  • Haydn. Trios for Flute, Cello and Piano Hob. XV:15-17 (M Rummel, cello) [CD recording]

    Rummel, Martin

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Uwe Grodd, flute (soloist) ; Martin Rummel, cello (soloist) ;Christopher Hinterhuber, piano (soloist) CD recording of Haydn, Flute Trios Hob XV;15-17. Digital distribution started in May 2011, physical release October 2011

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  • Thomas Daniel Schlee's opera 'Ich, Hiob' op 68 for tenor, soprano, solo cello and a small instrumental ensemble

    Rummel, Martin; Azesberger, K; Langmayr, U

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Thomas Daniel Schlee's opera "Ich, Hiob" op 68 for tenor, soprano, solo cello and a small instrumental ensemble had its world premiere (and simultaneous live recording by ORF)

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  • Trinity - J.S. Bach Soprano Arias

    Grodd, Uwe

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Uwe Grodd performer and Executive Producer, and others performers

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  • HUMMEL Mozart???s Symphonies Nos. 36 'Linz', 35 'Haffner' and 41 'Jupiter' Arranged for Pianoforte, Flute, Violin and Violoncello

    Grodd, Uwe

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Uwe Grodd, editor and performer, others performers

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  • Andrea Zani: Complete cello concertos

    Rummel, Martin

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Martin Rummel (cello soloist), K??lner Akademie (orchestra), Michael Alexander Willens (conductor) This recording was awarded the "Pizzicato Supersonic Award", the "American Record Guide Critics Choice" award and was listed on the Fanfare "Want List" as well as nominated for an ICMA award.

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  • Whaia te iti kahurangi

    Evans, Tecwyn (2016-02)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Wh??ia te iti kahurangi ki te t??ohu me he maunga tei tei : Seek the treasure you value most dearly: if you bow your head, let it be to a lofty mountain.

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  • Proms in the Park - Swansea

    Evans, Tecwyn

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • BBC Proms in the Park Caerphilly

    Evans, Tecwyn

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cradle Song

    Evans, Tecwyn (2016-01)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Setting of WH Auden's poem Cradle Song for SSAA choir a cappella

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  • Pakuranga

    Jack, Fiona

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this instalment of the Te Tuhi Billboard project Auckland-based artist Fiona Jack extends her ongoing series of works that re-present historical photographs within a contemporary art context. The three images presented in Pakuranga depict various outlooks from Te Tuhi's immediate surroundings circa 1910. As Jack has done with previous projects, included alongside the billboards is an accompanying text. An edited transcript of a discussion facilitated by the artist presents a discursive response to the images from artists, writers and historians Alan La Roche, Nova Paul, Luke Willis Thompson and Pita Turei. Scanned from glass plate negatives and then reproduced as billboards, Jack's latest project encourages us to consider transpositions of material and cultural histories. From a position only a few hundred metres from where the original photographs were taken, the viewer may reflect upon the immeasurable transformation that the Pakuranga and wider Auckland area has undergone since the images were first captured. This is reflected through the combination of technologies used as well. Upon close inspection of the billboards skins the viewer may notice scratches, dust and other markings inherent to glass plate photographic technology intentionally left visible as a reminder of the images' origins. Within the layers of archival evidence found in the content of imagery and the materiality of the medium, the billboards' potential as a point of historical contemplation is engaged. The provided transcript offers reflections on the relationship between the production of the original glass plates, the surrounding social and cultural contexts as well as the significance of all these today. The discussion itself moves from factual points of interest relating to flora, to histories of tangata whenua to more nuanced conversation akin to artistic response. With this, the artist proposes for, not only a deeper understanding of the potentially divergent histories that we may veil over a particular place but also a discursive model for talking about art. Writing by Shannon Te Ao

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  • Port workers

    Jack, Fiona

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2012, following a breakdown in negotiations with their employer and in defence of key aspects of their Collective Employment Agreement, unionised waterside workers at Ports of Auckland took strike action. Taking place against a backdrop of the privatisation of public infrastructure and substantial liberalisation of labour laws, this action was subject to intense scrutiny from the national media and generated sustained public debate. One hundred and sixty of the striking workers agreed to be photographed for posters that were pasted throughout Auckland city during the strike. Each poster consisted of a single portrait, with no text and no name. The workers did not want or need to be named. They recognised that the dissemination of their portraits throughout the city would serve to witness each of them as ordinary, hardworking people ??? a gesture that countered the anti-union assertion that they formed a singular, gang-like entity. The portraits reminded the Auckland public of the waterside workers??? individual human dignity and reflected back to them the most basic aspirations of their fellow citizens.

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  • The Trees, the story of a community action

    Jack, Fiona; Tanuvasa, S

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Trees, the story of a community action Fiona Jack and Salome Tanuvasa, March 2013, Rosebank Artwalk, Auckland, curated by Marcus Williams. This photograph depicts two historic trees in Avondale on the former site of the Connell homestead and market garden ??? approximately 321 Rosebank Road. These trees and the open fertile land around them are the last remnants of the Rosebank area???s rich market garden history spanning 1870 to 2008. A monumental community effort saved these trees from removal by property developers, however they are soon to be hidden from view by new industrial buildings, and the land at their feet will be blanketed in concrete. Digital photographic print (edition of 6 ??? 5 gifted to the community activists who led the effort to save the trees, and one to the Rosebank Peninsula community hall and church for permanent display), continuous spoken word performance over a weekend, ring-binder folder (council materials documenting the protracted proceedings), poems.

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  • Anzac Centenary print portfolio

    Jack, Fiona; Sandrasegar, S; Cotton, S; Spong, S; Parr, M; Reynolds, J; Cope, M; Johnson, M; Boyd, D; Graham, B

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The will of the people is law

    Jack, Fiona

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    From the catalogue text by Michael Ned Holte: Fiona Jack is an artist working in Auckland, New Zealand. Driven by research and dialogue, her work often explores the social space of political action, and she frequently draws upon collaboration in and with specific communities. The 2014 exhibition ???The Heraldry of Presence,??? at Auckland???s Fresh Gallery ?tara, consisted entirely of banners???some made by the artist based on historical protest signs, others borrowed from community groups or produced in collaboration with them. ???Banners can be disquiet, or celebratory,??? Gwyneth Porter argues in an essay on Jack. ???A banner, at a basic level, indicates the formation of a crowd, and a crowd suggests numbers of people that are too many to be a comfortable thing. A crowd is something that is big enough to make it hard to count it quickly, or at all, like a group of sparrows feeding. A group speaks of a collective and therefore a higher purpose; of a constituency or fellowship or conscience that is large enough to have power by virtue of its sheer force of volition.??? The subject of Jack???s presentation at Commonwealth & Council follows from a single banner in ???The Heraldry of Presence??? exhibition that reads, in emphatic all-caps, ???THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE IS LAW.??? The banner follows from a placard seen in a photograph of women marching in the 1915 rent strikes in Glasgow. The image carries personal history for the artist: Her great aunt Helen Crawfurd was one of the key organizers of the strikes. But divorced from this specific origin it becomes possible for the phrase to be read in a variety of cultural or geographical contexts, reflecting popular sentiment on either side of the political spectrum. Here, the banner is made and remade, and in the force or absurdity of that repetition the phrase reveals its allegorical potential in the present???or even in the future.

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  • A stitch in time

    Jack, Fiona; Van Zon, E; Orjis, R; Munro, V; Arps, D; O'Neill, A; Hickman, Yolunda; Hurley, G; Fitts, E

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    A curated group exhibition featuring work by artists working with textiles, ???A Stitch in Time??? brings together the work of nine artists exploring textiles in very different ways???. Includes work by ERICA VAN ZON, RICHARD ORJIS, VICTORIA MUNRO, DAN ARPS, FIONA JACK, ANI O'NEILL, YOLUNDA HICKMAN, GAVIN HURLEY and EMMA FITTS. ... FIONA JACK presents a selection of recent banner works that are witty, lyrical and thought provoking all at the same time. ???One of the banners???repeats the word ???tiresome??? over and over again in a cursive script. It has been appropriated from a child???s workbook Jack found in Taranaki. A child had been given the task of repeating certain words to develop her hand, and she had, in an apparent act of self-love, made a space for her own feelings in this labour.??? (Gwynneth Porter, The Heraldry of Presence exhibition catalogue, Fresh Gallery Otara, 2014). The other work takes its cue from Christchurch based artist Bill Sutton???s journals where in 1922 he wrote - ???When I have my breakfast, I cut off a slice of bread for myself and one for the birds. We are all in it together.??? Gwynneth Porter describes Jack???s work as ??????a practise that involves observation, and indexes something fleeting. There is also the direct repurposing of forms of presentation, and the desire to mediate on change and social cost??? (Gweneth Porter, ibid. 2014).

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  • Anzac Centenary print portfolio

    Jack, Fiona; Spong, S; Graham, B; Cotton, S; Reynolds, J; Boyd, D; Cope, M; Parr, M; Johnson, H; Sandrasegar, S

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Based in Auckland, Fiona Jack works across a range of media, undertaking archival research and collaborating with various communities around New Zealand to examine social histories. The prints in this portfolio were commissioned as an edition of 20; however each of Jack???s prints is a unique print. Stretching across a white expanse of 20 sheets is a survivors??? roll of honour. When thinking about family stories from both the First and Second World Wars Jack realised that ???in our large extended family everyone known to me survived???. Growing up she had not recognised the significance of this or appreciated it as a blessing. Tales of traumatised and damaged people returning home carried an emotional weight, and Jack was conscious that while ???they hadn???t made the ???ultimate sacrifice??? their experience was beyond anything I could imagine ??? yet none of them were on any national roll of honour???. In contrast to Australia, it was unusual for the names of First World War survivors to be listed on New Zealand memorials, and there was no complete list of those who served and survived. While it may appear to be a simple list, this singularly exhaustive roll of New Zealanders who fought in and survived the war was painstakingly assembled by Jack in collaboration with historian Phil Lascelles. It remains ???the first and most complete list??? of New Zealand First World War survivors to date, comprising 108,920 names compiled from original embarkation lists and extensive research.

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