275 results for Creative work

  • Blue Latitude (urban design proposal)

    Young, E (2012-05-29)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract

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  • Dew Drop (product design proposal)

    Young, E (2012-05-29)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract

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  • Mio Frame: commissioned modular system

    Young, E; Richards, E; Boardman, P (2012-05-29)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Mio Frame - Commissioned Practice based research project into demountable modular steel framed structural system with case study boutique demountable commercial office building, 2009.

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  • Emily place kindergarten. Competition entry for Auckland Architecture Association Cavalier Bremworth Awards 10

    Douglas, C; Douglas, L (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Auckland will densify, but Aucklanders are skeptical that quality of life can be maintained in a dense city. Proliferation of poor-quality city apartments has reinforced this skepticism. It is not enough to simply pack in more living quarters. For a viable, denser city, the whole range of urban and suburban programmes need to be reconsidered – the Ministry of Education, for example, has recently begun planning for an urban school in the central city. Kindergartens in New Zealand are a suburban typology, typically following the domestic pattern of house, verandah, and yard. Children learn to learn through play. Play is experimental and provisional engagement with other people, places, or things. Friedrich Fröbel, the instigator of the kindergarten movement, prescribed a series of tactile exercises aimed to help children develop spatial skills by slowing down perception. Emily Place Kindergarten is not a passive territory to be explored, but a dynamic system in which children participate. It is a space that children can affect; a medium for their developing sense of the world and their place in it.

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  • As it is Now [Director: Lesley Kaiser. Animation and Editing : Logan Austin]

    Kaiser, L; Austin, L (2011-08-19)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    This animation of daily photos (by Lesley Kaiser) of a blossom tree over a period of one year tracks the changing seasons in the microcosm of a Ponsonby garden, and responds to the fact that we are biological beings (and that any encounter with a work of art is a biological encounter). This work looks at digital aesthetics in nature within the wider context of cognitive science, evocriticism, poetry, and from an art practitioner’s perspective. Created in an era of climate change, the work is set against a background of a dying native cabbage tree, and nostalgically captures for the future the delight that springtime may bring, as well the sadness inherent in things (the Japanese concept of mono no aware). Technical aspects of animation: Logan Austin

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  • The Barricades Commission

    Douglas, C (2011-10-19)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    The initial drawing in this series was a response to the Auckland Architecture Association Urban Gaze 2006 competition, which invited spatial speculations on the city themed around the concept of the 'gift'. The work suggested, in line with Jacques Derrida's writing on gifts, that the truest gift was something without expectation of repayment, and that giving may overlap in strange ways with claiming. The drawing was awarded second prize. Along with two subsequent drawings, it became part of my research into barricading as a "redistribution of the sensible" (Rancière). The series won a contest on the high-profile website BLDGBLOG, and was published in Block, the newsletter of the Auckland Branch of the New Zealand Institute of Architects.

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  • Streaming. An intelligence agency for an unspecified city in a hot climate. Competition entry for Auckland Architecture Association Cavalier Bremworth Awards 06

    Douglas, C (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    This competition entry for the AAA Cavalier Bremworth Awards 06 was an exploration of the use of pattern generation and interference patterns in generating operational architectural space. It sought to create strategic inefficiencies as a contribution to the capacity for imagination in the institution it housed. A in-situ cast concrete shell is proposed, which would be partitioned and filled in according to the specific needs of the agency (a sample program is given on the far right). The subtle misfitting of the heirarchical program and the concrete shell will promote mismatches and shortcuts through the hierarchy in an attempt to multiply the accidental meetings: noticing a piece of paper on someone's desk; meeting someone over the watercooler; double-bookings of meeting rooms; encounters in the corridor; one department overflowing into the next. The building is apprehended through circulation. It is not a building which shows you your place. Although local fixity may be found in the circles and niches, movement reveals the continual streaming-away of the architecture. The project built on techniques and processes I developed for my previous project "Offshore" (2004), which won a Open Category Award at the AAA Cavalier Bremworth Awards.

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  • Garden window. Public space for ambient intelligence. Competition entry for NTT DoCoMo, Inc. Mobile society research institute international architectural design competition 2006

    Douglas, C (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Ambient intelligence is a public garden in which capabilities appear as flowers. This garden overlays the city precisely. We are all in two places at once: the city, and the garden of ambient intelligence. Keitai is a window for observing this other space. The most mundane and overlooked corners of the city blossom furiously! Flowers can be interacted with: to make a connection, to get some information. But the keitai can also be used to spy on the flowers interacting with each other - flourishing as their connections and abilities multiply.

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  • Surrender

    White, M; Charman, J (2011-12-01)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    A collaborative event between poet and photographer, presented as a simultaneous poetry reading and video performance for "rhythm & verse" series for the Titirangi Music Festival and Poetry Event

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  • Janet Charman’s "cold snack"

    White, M (2011-12-01)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Book Design: Cover design and photographic images: "St Jude's Crossing". Plus section title photographic images: One, Two and Three, from "All the Numbers from 1 to 96"

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  • E Tu Ake - standing strong

    Robertson, N (2011-12-01)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    This exhibition was shown at Te Papa from 9 April to 26 June 2011. It will be on display at musée du quai Branly in Paris, France, from 4 October 2011 to 22 January 2012. Visit the quai Branly website Tino rangatiratanga (the ability to choose one’s own destiny) lies at the heart of E Tū Ake: Standing Strong – an exhibition in which ancestral Māori treasures from Aotearoa New Zealand stand alongside contemporary works. E Tū Ake reflects the artistic depth and political aspirations of the vibrant indigenous culture of Aotearoa.

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  • Time dancers

    Piper, G (2011-12-02)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Involves motorised movement and fibre optic lighting

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  • Components of a special collection: a collaboration with the university of auckland fine arts library

    White, M (2011-12-01)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    The exhibition was initiated with a survey of the entire collection of artists books in the university of auckland fine arts library. Through this process various approaches, or components, to the practice of book making were identified, which were then used as a curatorial tool to select books for display. Subsequently by working closely with librarians, these books were presented in projectspace as a pop up reading room and extension of the university of auckland fine arts library.

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  • Boy

    Ings, Welby (2011-12-07)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Boy is Welby Ings' short film about a young male prostitute in a small New Zealand town who discovers the truth behind a fatal hit and run accident. When news of the death spreads through the district, the family of the responsible driver realise that the boy must be kept silent. Using local gossip they set out to frighten him into submission. The pressure becomes increasingly aggressive and through it the boy [who never speaks] battles to expose the truth. Boy was a multi-award winning experiment in poetic narrative as film. Between 2004 and 2007 it was officially selected in competition for over 50 international film festivals. It was also long-listed for the 2006 Academy awards after winning Best Short Film in the prestigious Cinequest International Film Festival. The film flows as a single, linear thread. Its aesthetic references stylistic approaches taken to advertising narratives in New Zealand [integrated colour palettes, editing rhythms and structures]. A significant feature of this approach is the highly condensed nature of the story. The narrative [which might normally be told as a 55 minute drama] is now heavily compressed into less than a quarter of that time. As a result edited sequences average out at 1.2 seconds in duration. The effect establishes an unusually condensed, dreamlike, visually rich form of storytelling that alludes to the world of music video and TVCs but uses these references to develop a very intricate, intensified form of storytelling. [35mm silent, short film with typography.]

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  • Te Ao Taketake

    King, JS (2011-12-19)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Kua roa tā tātou whawhai, arā, tā te ao taketake whawhai ki a tauiwi, mō te mana motuhake o te tangata. Kei roto i ngā pukapuka hītori me ngā kōrero tuku iho a ngā tūpuna te taunakitanga o ngā taukumekume, o ngā kakaritanga ki a tauiwi. I pae mai a tauiwi ki uta ki ngā takutai o ngā whenua katoa o te ao. Ko tā tauiwi mahi ki te ao taketake, he patu tikanga, he kōhuru tāngata, he raupatu whenua, ā, monemone noa. Ki ngētehi tāngata kua panoni ngā tai, kua mutu tēneki mahi, ā, kua murua ngā hara o tauiwi mā. Engari kē, ki ngētehi atu, e whakamau tonu ana i ngā kinonga a tauiwi. E patua tonutia ana ngā tikanga taketake, e raupatu whenua tonu ana a tauiwi. Heoti anō, ko te tino e whakararuraru ana i ngā mātanga mātauranga o te ao taketake, ko te kōhurutanga o te mana motuhake, ā, ko te tūrakitanga hoki o te tino rangatiratanga. He āhua kino, he whakaaro kino kua āta kuhu haere i ngā poka o te hinengaro, i ngā kokonga o te ngākau, ā, i ngā awe o te wairua. E pā kaha tonu ana tēneki āhua ki ngā tāngata o te ao taketake.

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  • Taku Manu Tāwhiowhio

    King, JS (2011-12-19)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    I te marama o Hakihea, i te tau 2010, i toko ake te huatau kia titoa tētehi waiata mō Tā Pāora Reeves. Nā tōna kaha ki te mahi i te ao Māori, i te ao Pākehā, ā, i te ao Atua anō hoki. E mohiotia whānuitia ana e te tī, e te tā, ehake a Tā Pāora Reeves i te tangata, he ata kē ia nō te Atua. Ko ia rā hoki te Manukura o te Wānanga Aronui o Tāmaki Makau Rau. Nō reira, he waiata tautoko tēneki waiata. He waiata whakareka hoki i ngana kupu, i ngana kōrero waiwaiā. He waiata e tiutiu atu ana ki ngā manu o te kī, kia whakapiripiri mai ki te rākau taumatua, ki reira kōrerorero ai ngā take o te wā. He pātere e takitaki haere ana i ngā tohu whenua, tohu maunga, tohu awa, tohu moana anō hoki. Kei roto tonu i ngā ingoa o ngā wāhi he kōrero hītori tāngata, he kōrero hītori whenua mō Tāmaki Makau Rau.

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  • Taku Maukura e Rere Rā

    King, JS (2011-12-19)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    He Poroporoaki ki a Tā Pāora Reeves, Te Manukura o Te Wānanga Aronui o Tāmaki Makaurau 2005-20011. Poroporoaki are eulogies, or farewell speeches to the dead, and contain beautiful language and express people’s grief. Metaphoric language and allusions to the tribal connections, geographic places of significance, traditional places that the spirits of the dead are believed to travel to, and the status and work of the deceased, are a feature of poroporoaki. For these reasons they are difficult to translate so that the full meaning is expressed in English. Poroporoaki are delivered as though the person is alive, as the belief is that the wairua (spirit) remains with the body for a time before burial.

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  • ‘He poroporoaki ki te rangatira nā tana irāmutu’

    King, JS (2011-12-19)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    He kupu whakataki: I te 29 o ngā rā o Whiringa ā-nuku, 2010, i mate mai tētehi o ngā tino kaumātua nō te kāinga nei, nō Te Tahaaroa. Ko te iwi ko Waikato, ko te hapū ko Ngāti Mahuta (ki te tai hauāuru). Ko tōna marae ko Te Kōraha, ā, ko Wharetoroa Robert (Bob) Kerr tōna ingoa. He pou whakakikiwā, he teo herenga waka, he rākau tau matua nō roto tonu mai i te rohe o Tainui. I taetae atu te iti, te rahi, me kī rā, te hārakerake ki te tuku mihi, tuku poroporoaki me te whakatakoto kōrero ki te marae ātea mō te rangatira nei i te wā i takahia ai e ia te mata o te whenua.

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  • Revolutions per minute

    Cullen, P (2012-04-12)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Six sculptures forming a part of my ongoing r/p/m project. With the exception of one work none had previously been exhibited. Chartwell collection purchased two of the sculptures from this exhibition.

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  • Stockholm Falsework

    Cullen, P (2012-04-12)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Falsework is a temporary scaffold-like architectural support which is used to hold elements in place during construction and until they become self supporting. Paul Cullen’s Falsework sculptures are makeshift constructions in which items of furniture are inverted and supported off the floor and against the ceiling. These sculptures could be said to model the unlikely situation in which gravity is suspended and objects are able to float free from their usual restraints. Or they could be regarded as modelling a situation in which the inverse of the everyday, in which objects sit upon the floor, is presented. The do-it-yourself aesthetic of these sculptures has a basis in the drawings of Heath Robinson and Rube Goldberg. Both men drew complex, makeshift and illogical devices designed to perform simple tasks by indirect means and to represent the application of irrational principles to the pursuit of rational outcomes. The Falsework sculptures are improvised constructions of relationships between ordinary objects reliant, like the whimsies of Goldberg and Robinson, on impractical and makeshift means. Although they are model-like, the Falsework sculptures only imitate the act of representation up to a certain point; they serve no real purpose and instead refer insistently to the processes of their own making and materiality.

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