250 results for Creative work

  • Stockholm Falsework

    Cullen, P (2012-04-12)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Falsework is a temporary scaffold-like architectural support which is used to hold elements in place during construction and until they become self supporting. Paul Cullen’s Falsework sculptures are makeshift constructions in which items of furniture are inverted and supported off the floor and against the ceiling. These sculptures could be said to model the unlikely situation in which gravity is suspended and objects are able to float free from their usual restraints. Or they could be regarded as modelling a situation in which the inverse of the everyday, in which objects sit upon the floor, is presented. The do-it-yourself aesthetic of these sculptures has a basis in the drawings of Heath Robinson and Rube Goldberg. Both men drew complex, makeshift and illogical devices designed to perform simple tasks by indirect means and to represent the application of irrational principles to the pursuit of rational outcomes. The Falsework sculptures are improvised constructions of relationships between ordinary objects reliant, like the whimsies of Goldberg and Robinson, on impractical and makeshift means. Although they are model-like, the Falsework sculptures only imitate the act of representation up to a certain point; they serve no real purpose and instead refer insistently to the processes of their own making and materiality.

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  • As it is Now [Director: Lesley Kaiser. Animation: Logan Austin] in Animacall Animation Project 2011, The Contemporary Art Center of Thessaloniki (part of the State Museum of Contemporary Art in Greece).

    Kaiser, L; Austin, L (2011-08-19)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    This animation of daily photos (by Lesley Kaiser) of a blossom tree over a period of one year tracks the changing seasons in the microcosm of a Ponsonby garden and responds to the fact that a work of art can be seen as a biological encounter. This work looks at digital aesthetics in nature within the wider context of cognitive science, evocriticism, poetry, and from an art practitioner’s perspective. Created in an era of climate change, the work is set against a background of a dying native cabbage tree, and nostalgically captures for the future the delight that springtime may bring, as well the sadness inherent in things (the Japanese concept of mono no aware). Technical aspects of animation: Logan Austin

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  • Panelbeating. Automotive landscape. Competition entry for Auckland Architecture Association Cavalier Bremworth awards '07

    Douglas, C; Douglas, L (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Carparks are not to be thought of as simply service-spaces. Large carparks typically have distant corners which are rarely used for parking. These spaces take on another life, serving a range of complex functions: kicking it, demonstrating the volume of car audio systems, ghost-riding the whip, eating KFC, waiting up, showing off, making trademe meetings, performing minor repairs and upgrades. This project proposes a strategic excess of parking in order to allow for these events. Rather than a place to leave your car, this project provides a space which is inhabited in continual reference to the mobile space of the car. The site is located on Ti Rakau Drive in Pakuranga, a main arterial route to the Botany Downs shopping centre, and the rapid suburban developments of East Auckland. The area is dominated by vehicular traffic, big-box retail, and industry. The large scale of the site is unfriendly to pedestrians. A panelbeating shop is a sophisticated formal laboratory. Sheets of metal are shaped three-dimensionally through bending, hammering, moulding, routing, punching, denting. Aftermarket modification is often sneered at as an amateur pursuit, aesthetically unworthy. The technologies and formal strategies of car modification are used in this project to address the primarily surface-based condition of a carpark. Solar panel surfaces made from laminate of toughened glass and extruded photovoltaic sheets collect power for lighting. Future increases in efficiency of photovoltaics will allow recharging of electric vehicles. Plates are folded up into low islands and oriented to collect sunlight. Service masts made of folded and welded steel sheets provide lighting and patchy surveillance. Selected masts also incorporate self-service fuel pumps and recharge ports. Rubbish bins are recessed into the ground. Surface water is gathered into shallow puddles which become sheets of slightly oily water when it rains. When puddles reach a predetermined size they drain into a system of shallow channels and culverts cut into the parking surface and run off into tidal sedimentation basins. Mangroves trap anoxic sediment and prevent trace metals and contaminants from entering groundwater and waterways. The existing tidal creek at the north boundary has been dredged and extended into large tidal sedimentation basins which collect surface water. Sediment will accumulate as mangroves take hold, and the system will stabilise according to the amount of runoff.

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  • Undrowned

    Richards, JGR

    Creative work
    Massey University

    Undrowned is a creative response to performing in Sally J Morgan’s In the Hollow of Your Hand as part of Deep Anatomy/Fluid States, 2015.

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  • Drei Equali

    Taylor, SM (2011-09-29)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    This is a high quality type-setting of a trombone quartet composed by Beethoven, created using LilyPond software from an old public domain scanned score. The original source was Breitkopf & Härtel, Beethoven Gesamtausgabe, 1862-1865, located on the IMSLP website.

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  • Concerto Auckland; Kufferath, Irons, Salzmann trio

    Irons, D; Kufferath, E; Salzmann, Edith

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Piano trio evening with works by Haydn and Brahms Joseph Haydn, Trio G Major Hob. XV. Elliott Carter, Mnemosyne for violin & Figment IV for viola. Maurice Ravel, Sonata for violin and piano No.2 in G Major. Johannes Brahms, Trio in B Major op.8.

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  • Fashion and Fibres; Island dress in Polynesia

    Forgan, S (2015-12-03)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lythberg, B., catalogue author

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  • Doggerel for bass flute

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (2015-11)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Eve de Castro-Robinson: composer

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  • Releasing the Angel for cello and orchestra [For David Chickering]

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (2005)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    a 15 minute work for cello and orchestra. Premiered in Hamilton then performed in Auckland and Wellington. Recorded and broadcast by Concert FM.

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  • Chaos of Delight III for womens voices [To Karen Grylls]

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (1998)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Recorded NZ Choral Music CD SLD 108 Kiwi-Pacific Auckland University Singers conducted by Karen Grylls

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  • Tuku Iho, Legado vivo M??ori???NZMACI exhibition in South America

    NZMACI (2015-12-03)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lythberg, B., catalogue author

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  • Te Mahou: Ko Te Matatini

    NZMACI (2015-12-03)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lythberg, B. author of catalogue

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  • Tauhi V??: the art of socio-spatial relations???Legacies of 18th century Tongan arts

    Afu, S; Edwards, T; Fonua, L; Gillies, TE; Burrows, SF; Havea, T; Kaloni, Tomui; Mafile'o, E; Mafile'o, V; Ofamo'oni, M; Toetu'u, '; Work, B; Mahina, O; Potauaine, S

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lythberg, B., exhibition curator, catalogue author and editor Tauhi V?? is the latest group exhibtion of Auckland-based Tongan Artists??? collective No???o Fakataha. It explores the ways they and invited guests ??? tend relationships with people, and through art, across time and space. The resulting works, many of which feature decorated barkcloth (ngatu), give material form to socio-spatial relations.

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  • Andrea Zani: Complete cello concertos

    Rummel, Martin

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Martin Rummel (cello soloist), K??lner Akademie (orchestra), Michael Alexander Willens (conductor) This recording was awarded the "Pizzicato Supersonic Award", the "American Record Guide Critics Choice" award and was listed on the Fanfare "Want List" as well as nominated for an ICMA award.

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  • Gidon Bing???s modernist milieu

    Bing, G (2015-12-03)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lythberg, B., catalogue author

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  • Diptych South

    Febvre-Richards, ER; Merlino, D

    Creative work
    Massey University

    Diptych South is an audiovisual project that explores the physiological effects of the rhythms of colour and music in relation to memory and place. It questions the nature of our memory and connection to place by playing with repetition and difference. The two video pieces for the work are almost identical and are inspired by Febvre-Richards’ regular ‘journeying’ in the New Zealand forest. The repetition of such journeys – the memories and anticipations, the expectation of familiar sensorial experiences – provides rich inspiration for mark making on paper. There is a potentially static nature to this representation, which may convey a momentary sense of place but cannot capture the experiential journey to and through the forest. This problem is ameliorated by the reworking into video form. It is here that the temporal interplay between past as memory plays with the present as experience and the future as anticipation. However, not every experience is identical. To explore the nature of the difference of these temporal experiences, Merlino has provided two contrasting sound pieces that are not juxtaposed with the video work, but rather attempt to show how the experiential sameness of the video actually inspires difference and uniqueness. It is the sameness of our sense of place that inspires a variety of affective responses, thus dispelling the idea that our experiences, when tinged with memory and anticipation, must always remain the same.

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  • Life Size

    Richards, JGR

    Creative work
    Massey University

    Commissioned piece of creative autobiographical writing produced for the Ardtornish Retreat in partnership with Scottish Book Trust 2014. The text is thematically focused on 'love' and actively searches for the 'magical' within the natural world, using metaphor and imagery from the geographically isolated location. (The Ardtornish Estate on the Morvern Peninsula in the Scottish Highlands.)

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  • The Light Horizon

    Jenkinson, Megan

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Light Horizon exhibition draws on photographs taken during my two weeks on the Ice as an Antarctic Artist’s Fellow, Dec. 2005. The show was significant for its scale and scope – 40 digital photo collage works, and lenticular prints, from eight different series. It represents the culmination of my most significant research outputs from the ‘Antarctica’ project to date and included works selected from the exhibitions The Dark Continent, Jonathan Smart Gallery, Christchurch, Jun-July 2007, and The Weight of Water, Mark Hutchins Gallery, Wellington, Sept 2007. This exhibition occupied both the downstairs and upstairs galleries at Two Rooms, one of New Zealand’s leading galleries. [583] Commentary: This research acknowledges Antarctica as a complex site that cannot be summed up in one particular artistic approach. The images I produced represent a major departure from my previous photographic practice and constitute a range of approaches differing considerably from the majority of photography undertaken on the Continent. In my work landscape was the starting point for a series of meditations on Antarctica’s heroic age of exploration, Antarctica as a place of speculation and wonder, a site of scientific study and more recently commercial speculation. Digital montage enabled me to overlay past and present, the scientific and cultural, while the visual trickery of the lenticular process (first used in The Dark Continent, 2007) provided further conceptual shifts, emphasizing the uncertainty and instability of the landscapes in view. Virginia Were in Volatile Imaginings, Art News New Zealand, Winter 2008, wrote: “Megan Jenkinson’s visit to Antarctica has spawned an extraordinary series of photographs, which present a post-romantic view of our engagement with nature’… ‘[her work is] like an extended love poem to a place she found both confounding and inspiring’… ‘Jenkinson’s photographic montages are brilliant evocations of these atmospheric phenomena [auroras and mirages], visual tricks from the imagination of this acclaimed artist’. Reviewed in The NZ Herald and 5 works collected by Te Papa Tongarewa. [1,214] • Part of the Auckland Festival of Photography, 2008, receiving additional public exposure as a result. • Five Works collected by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington. • Volatile Imaginings’, Artist’s Profile, Art News, New Zealand, Winter, 2008, pages 72 – 75. • Adam Gifford, ‘Changing View of a Frozen Land,’ review, in the New Zealand Herald, illustrated, 20.5.09 • Sharu Delilkan, ‘Trick of the Light,’ review in The Aucklander, illustrated, 7.5.08 • Gallery Talk on the exhibition, Two Rooms (in connection with the 2008 Auckland Festival of Photography), 11.6.08 • Gallery talk to members of the Paradise Art Group. • The exhibition was advertised in the following: Art News, New Zealand, Winter 2008 (full page colour advertisement); Art Zone April/June 2008 (full page); and the Auckland Readers and Writers Festival ’08 booklet (1/3 page). • “I was horrified by the Brilliance of your work. My jaw dropped open as I tried to comprehend how you achieved it all.” (Email from Greta Anderson, ex student and tutor at Elam).

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  • REVOLVE An interactive performance

    Brown, Carol; Niemetz, A; Gander, P; Medlin, M; Scoones, R

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Co-conceived by Carol Brown and Anne Niemetz; dancing, choreography, spoken text and performance elements authored by Carol Brown; Anne Niemetz designed the wearable technology, interface system and filmed and edited the video compoent; Russell Scoones developed the recorded soundscape; Philippa Gander contributed expertise as a sleep scientist and co-researcher in the developmental stages of the project dramaturgy; Margie Medlin was responsible for the overall lighting design and related performance elements; additional contributors included Fiona Graham and Alys Longley who contributed to the development of the performance texts. REVOLVE is a real-time interactive performance that sheds light on the ‘stuff’ dreams are made of, the night-stories and bodily states that shape our sleeping hours. As an arts-science collaboration, the research imperative was to translate the data of a sleep scientist into sonic and choreographic content through wearable technologies. The work invites audiences to experience a series of states enfolding voice, sound, light, video and dance, as she metaphorically traces the path of the sleeper’s mind and body from dusk to dawn. Driven by a curiosity about the body, its rhythms and potential for change, the work alludes to the planetary, physiological and personal cycles that round our lives. In doing so, it explores how the non-literalness of scientific phenomena (data from EEG readings of brain waves) can be mapped through interactive performance and made meaningful as a series of performative states for audiences. The performance ecology enfolds wearable electronic sensor technology, video, lighting, text, recorded sound and an interactive sound environment within a choreographic score. Sensing the body, its gestures and its environment through the measurement of light, tilt and acceleration, Carol Brown wears a “sensor suit” that allows her to intuitively control and interact with a malleable sound environment. She can respond to this environment by choosing to expose or hide light-sensitive parts of her body and combining these actions with movements of varied speed. In turn, the sonic feedback influences the emerging choreographic score, inducing constraints and generative cyclic patterns for movement. The dramaturgy is driven by concepts based on the physiological cycles that underlie sleeping and waking, which are in turn shaped by our circadian biological clock that keeps our sleep/wake cycle coordinated with the rotation of the earth. REVOLVE includes scenes that are inspired by states such as light sleep – delving in and out of wakefulness; deep sleep – a state in which the brain’s neuronal activity synchs up to create very slow and large brainwaves; and REM sleep – a state characterised by nervous muscle twitches and rapid eye movements that come from an active, but sleeping brain. At the end of the performance there is a metaphorical breech into waking consciousness as the brain re-engages with the external world through purposeful and directed movement. The sound design is partially composed, and partially interactive. The composed sounds are sourced from EEG brainwaves, recordings of a sleeping child and the voice of tenor Keith Lewis. The interactive sounds are based on the auditory beat, a phenomenon that arises when two pure tones of different, but neighbouring frequencies are played together. In such a situation, a beat frequency emerges, perceived as a periodic pulsing of the sound. These beats – waves of sound - are powerful to listen to, physically moving, subsonic but clearly perceivable.

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  • Polymer Monoliths

    Robinson, Peter

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    New Zealand artist Peter Robinson was last seen at the IMA in 2005, exhibiting alongside Gordon Bennett in the exhibition Three Colours. There he offered his sceptical take on post-colonial art-and-identity politics. His recent work, however, leaves such issues behind, in what seems like an abruptly formalist about-face. He has moved away from illustrating political, scientific, and philosophical ideas, and toward playing with materials and exploring the resulting poetic nuances. He's been working with polystyrene—that mundane, everyday material of consumer excess. A non-biodegradable thermo-plastic, it cushions our electronic goods in transit and pollutes our foreshores. In Robinson's work, it is also a sculptural material of infinite possibility—lightweight yet massive, able to fill large spaces yet also to articulate delicate forms. Robinson pursues multiple lines of inquiry, as if, given polystyrene's association with disposability, any number of sculptural experiments could be explored, cast aside, and reworked. His work ranges from roughly hewn, lumpen forms to intricately carved, baroque ones. In our show, Robinson continues his recent exploration of the monolith. In conjunction with Artspace, Sydney; supported by Creative New Zealand, University of Auckland, and Brisbane's Urban Art Projects.

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