275 results for Creative work

  • As it is Now [Director: Lesley Kaiser. Animation: Logan Austin] in Animacall Animation Project 2011, The Contemporary Art Center of Thessaloniki (part of the State Museum of Contemporary Art in Greece).

    Kaiser, L; Austin, L (2011-08-19)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    This animation of daily photos (by Lesley Kaiser) of a blossom tree over a period of one year tracks the changing seasons in the microcosm of a Ponsonby garden and responds to the fact that a work of art can be seen as a biological encounter. This work looks at digital aesthetics in nature within the wider context of cognitive science, evocriticism, poetry, and from an art practitioner’s perspective. Created in an era of climate change, the work is set against a background of a dying native cabbage tree, and nostalgically captures for the future the delight that springtime may bring, as well the sadness inherent in things (the Japanese concept of mono no aware). Technical aspects of animation: Logan Austin

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  • Panelbeating. Automotive landscape. Competition entry for Auckland Architecture Association Cavalier Bremworth awards '07

    Douglas, C; Douglas, L (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Carparks are not to be thought of as simply service-spaces. Large carparks typically have distant corners which are rarely used for parking. These spaces take on another life, serving a range of complex functions: kicking it, demonstrating the volume of car audio systems, ghost-riding the whip, eating KFC, waiting up, showing off, making trademe meetings, performing minor repairs and upgrades. This project proposes a strategic excess of parking in order to allow for these events. Rather than a place to leave your car, this project provides a space which is inhabited in continual reference to the mobile space of the car. The site is located on Ti Rakau Drive in Pakuranga, a main arterial route to the Botany Downs shopping centre, and the rapid suburban developments of East Auckland. The area is dominated by vehicular traffic, big-box retail, and industry. The large scale of the site is unfriendly to pedestrians. A panelbeating shop is a sophisticated formal laboratory. Sheets of metal are shaped three-dimensionally through bending, hammering, moulding, routing, punching, denting. Aftermarket modification is often sneered at as an amateur pursuit, aesthetically unworthy. The technologies and formal strategies of car modification are used in this project to address the primarily surface-based condition of a carpark. Solar panel surfaces made from laminate of toughened glass and extruded photovoltaic sheets collect power for lighting. Future increases in efficiency of photovoltaics will allow recharging of electric vehicles. Plates are folded up into low islands and oriented to collect sunlight. Service masts made of folded and welded steel sheets provide lighting and patchy surveillance. Selected masts also incorporate self-service fuel pumps and recharge ports. Rubbish bins are recessed into the ground. Surface water is gathered into shallow puddles which become sheets of slightly oily water when it rains. When puddles reach a predetermined size they drain into a system of shallow channels and culverts cut into the parking surface and run off into tidal sedimentation basins. Mangroves trap anoxic sediment and prevent trace metals and contaminants from entering groundwater and waterways. The existing tidal creek at the north boundary has been dredged and extended into large tidal sedimentation basins which collect surface water. Sediment will accumulate as mangroves take hold, and the system will stabilise according to the amount of runoff.

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  • These arms to hold you: for children's voices and orchestra; text by Bill Manhire

    de Castro-Robinson, EK; Manhire, W (2007)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Composer a work for orchestra and children's voices commissioned for the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra by the Royal NZ Plunket Society to celebrate its 100th anniversary. A collaboration with poet Bill Manhire from Victoria University.

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  • Haydn. Trios for Flute, Cello and Piano Hob. XV:15-17 (M Rummel, cello) [CD recording]

    Rummel, Martin

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Uwe Grodd, flute (soloist) ; Martin Rummel, cello (soloist) ;Christopher Hinterhuber, piano (soloist) CD recording of Haydn, Flute Trios Hob XV;15-17. Digital distribution started in May 2011, physical release October 2011

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  • Thomas Daniel Schlee's opera 'Ich, Hiob' op 68 for tenor, soprano, solo cello and a small instrumental ensemble

    Rummel, Martin; Azesberger, K; Langmayr, U

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Thomas Daniel Schlee's opera "Ich, Hiob" op 68 for tenor, soprano, solo cello and a small instrumental ensemble had its world premiere (and simultaneous live recording by ORF)

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  • HUMMEL Mozart???s Symphonies Nos. 36 'Linz', 35 'Haffner' and 41 'Jupiter' Arranged for Pianoforte, Flute, Violin and Violoncello

    Grodd, Uwe

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Uwe Grodd, editor and performer, others performers

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  • Whaia te iti kahurangi

    Evans, Tecwyn (2016-02)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Wh??ia te iti kahurangi ki te t??ohu me he maunga tei tei : Seek the treasure you value most dearly: if you bow your head, let it be to a lofty mountain.

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  • Proms in the Park - Swansea

    Evans, Tecwyn

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • BBC Proms in the Park Caerphilly

    Evans, Tecwyn

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Cradle Song

    Evans, Tecwyn (2016-01)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Setting of WH Auden's poem Cradle Song for SSAA choir a cappella

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  • Pakuranga

    Jack, Fiona

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this instalment of the Te Tuhi Billboard project Auckland-based artist Fiona Jack extends her ongoing series of works that re-present historical photographs within a contemporary art context. The three images presented in Pakuranga depict various outlooks from Te Tuhi's immediate surroundings circa 1910. As Jack has done with previous projects, included alongside the billboards is an accompanying text. An edited transcript of a discussion facilitated by the artist presents a discursive response to the images from artists, writers and historians Alan La Roche, Nova Paul, Luke Willis Thompson and Pita Turei. Scanned from glass plate negatives and then reproduced as billboards, Jack's latest project encourages us to consider transpositions of material and cultural histories. From a position only a few hundred metres from where the original photographs were taken, the viewer may reflect upon the immeasurable transformation that the Pakuranga and wider Auckland area has undergone since the images were first captured. This is reflected through the combination of technologies used as well. Upon close inspection of the billboards skins the viewer may notice scratches, dust and other markings inherent to glass plate photographic technology intentionally left visible as a reminder of the images' origins. Within the layers of archival evidence found in the content of imagery and the materiality of the medium, the billboards' potential as a point of historical contemplation is engaged. The provided transcript offers reflections on the relationship between the production of the original glass plates, the surrounding social and cultural contexts as well as the significance of all these today. The discussion itself moves from factual points of interest relating to flora, to histories of tangata whenua to more nuanced conversation akin to artistic response. With this, the artist proposes for, not only a deeper understanding of the potentially divergent histories that we may veil over a particular place but also a discursive model for talking about art. Writing by Shannon Te Ao

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  • Port workers

    Jack, Fiona

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2012, following a breakdown in negotiations with their employer and in defence of key aspects of their Collective Employment Agreement, unionised waterside workers at Ports of Auckland took strike action. Taking place against a backdrop of the privatisation of public infrastructure and substantial liberalisation of labour laws, this action was subject to intense scrutiny from the national media and generated sustained public debate. One hundred and sixty of the striking workers agreed to be photographed for posters that were pasted throughout Auckland city during the strike. Each poster consisted of a single portrait, with no text and no name. The workers did not want or need to be named. They recognised that the dissemination of their portraits throughout the city would serve to witness each of them as ordinary, hardworking people ??? a gesture that countered the anti-union assertion that they formed a singular, gang-like entity. The portraits reminded the Auckland public of the waterside workers??? individual human dignity and reflected back to them the most basic aspirations of their fellow citizens.

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  • Breathe, an electroacoustic work

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (2010)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Composer Flautist Programme Note Breathe was commissioned by Irish flautist Bill Dowdall and features the sounds of him performing on both bass and sliding headjoint flutes. The other sonorities are vocalisms made by a young Italian visual artist, Alice Grassi, I met while we were both Associate Artists at the Atlantic Centre for the Arts in Florida in 2010. I was taken with her lilting voice and made many recordings. Breathe is an amalgam of breath, voice and flute sounds in a sensuous and suggestive interplay. It is included on the Atoll CD Breathe, new notes for flute from Ireland & New Zealand (ACD 111).

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  • Cirrus

    Matthews, Stephen (2007)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    My role in the creation of this work was as the composer as well as the provision of complete parts to the NZSO including the addition of the final string bowings The title Cirrus is taken from the first stanza of James K. Baxter???s poem, High Country Weather (1948). Alone we are born And die alone Yet see the red-gold cirrus Over snow mountain shine Upon the upland road Ride easy stranger Surrender to the sky Your heart of anger What appealed was the depiction of individual endeavour, the expansive backdrop of New Zealand rural imagery and the poem???s final plea. Despite the foreboding beginning, metaphorically the ???red-gold cirrus??? foretells of a change for the better. Cirrus are beautiful high transparent clouds typically streaming in the direction of the wind, usually signalling the arrival of fair weather. The opening of the piece employs high-pitched bell-like chords. While the upper and lower strings hold a sustained note, a bass clarinet introduces the first significant melodic theme. After the first full-orchestral climax the texture of the climax quickly dissipates to reveal a high-pitched modal melody. The brass abruptly interrupts this moment of quiet with an augmentation of the previous theme. After this interruption subsides the character of the music gradually becomes more uplifting and confident. Then solo instruments perform themes over a lively syncopated chromatic pizzicato bass line and variations of the original theme repeat, driving the music forward to reach the final climax. The piece ends with a final recapitulation of the high modal melody and arpeggiated echoes of the opening bell-like chords in the tuned percussion.

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  • Muddy Urbanism: an LA dialogue

    Waghorn, Kathy; Haringa, H; Jones, R; Khoo, Chia Venn; Seung Kim, Sophia; Lapwood, A; Shake Lee, Z; Lin, S; Paget, V; Ryan, H; Yoo, A; Mecredy, E

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    A piece of collective urban research on the Whau River, Auckland MUDDY URBANISM www.muddyurbanismlab.wordpress.com Auckland, the largest city in New Zealand, has a unique geography, with an extensive coastline abutting urban areas. While architects, planners and politicians often discuss the importance of ???the waterfront???, the view of this watery edge is frequently restricted to the inner city and the exclusive beach suburbs. However Auckland ???fronts??? the water in many different ways and spaces, most of which are ignored in an urban sense. One such space is the Whau River estuary. The Whau River bisects the inner west of T??maki Makaurau Auckland. Its path creates a portage, connecting two harbours, permitting the movement with waka (canoe) between the east and west coasts. This portage has seen over one thousand years of occupation and use. Pre-colonisation, the Whau was one of the main active frameworks of social connection and economic production and in the colonial economy it played a crucial role in the settlement and urbanisation of Auckland???s west, as both a transport route for food and as a source of clay. In latter decades however, the Whau has lost its importance. No longer a transport route, and for much of the recent past a boundary between municipalities, it has increasingly become the site of multiple conflicts across jurisdictional, economic, land use and natural systems. Muddy Urbanism is a special urban-research workshop at The School of Architecture and Planning (The University of Auckland) that engages in the critical mapping of the Whau in order to visualise the many conflicts that have been hidden from institutional thinking and to propose new interfaces between urban policy, ecological systems and community participation for the regeneration of this catchment. This research project amplifies the local as a critical site of intervention for rethinking existing land use, public and environmental infrastructure, and neighbourhood-based socio-economic development, in order to re-imagine a productive coastline for the many different waterfronts of Auckland.

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  • Flotilla Whau, a work as part of the Rosebank Art Walk, Auckland Arts Festival

    Patel, N; Waghorn, Kathy; Bush, R

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Development of one day participatory event / socially engaged art work for the Rosebank Artwalk, curated by Marcus Williams as part of the Auckland Arts Festival. Commissioned as part of the Rosebank Art Walk (Auckland Arts Festival 2013) the Flotilla Whau was intended as a one-day event where a collection of water-craft traversed a marked course on the Whau river in Auckland, new Zealand. Situated as both art work and community development event, the flotilla brought river users together, stimulating connection and ongoing discussion. The intention of the flotilla was to mark out this marginal estuarine space, in some way drawing attention to it, and in so doing re-establishing the river as a visible,material space that can be occupied, a place one can be in and on. The Flotilla was repeated in 2014 as a stand alone event, with the number of participants increasing from 50 to 300. As a result of the success of these two events the Flotilla Whau was offered funding from Auckland Council for 2015, which allowed for the event to grow the performative spatial and visual components. The 2015 Flotilla Whau took place on Sunday February 8 in collaboration with the Voyager, New Zealand Maritime Museum.

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  • No. 3 from Nine Short Pieces for piano, an arrangement of the Douglas Lilburn piano piece

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve; Lilburn, DG (2015-09-03)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stroma: performers Hamish McKeich: conductor The third of Lilburn's Nine Short Pieces has a whimsical, almost cartoonish feel to it, as well as a Latin swing, it's syncopated, suggestive and insinuating, with nudging little statement-phrases answered by low punctuations. It's quasi-humorous, repetitive, insistent and, ironically, very restrained - vintage Lilburn. I've heightened the qualities I hear in it, and exaggerated them, since to me it's crying out to be released from its rather reserved and sparse setting. It seemed to beg colourful, distinctive instrumentation, a clear texture which is enriched where needed, and I've added characterful percussion and sonic touches such as a flexatone and the vocal ahhs and oohhs to release its jazzy quality. To me, it's in Lilburn's piano oeuvre that he reveals his true self. Composers understand that they are laid bare in pianistic utterance, and this is particularly evident in DGL. If you listen say, to the first of the Three Sea Changes, the material itself is extremely economical, but its emotional impact is immediate. Few works speak to me so eloquently of NZ, as much of DGL's piano music. Despite DGL being rather cool and terse on the surface, the interactions I had with him exposed a warm and wry side. There's an irony in that the first thing he ever said to me was after hearing a student work of mine played in St Andrew on the Terrace in the mid-80s: "Yes, I heard your piece - a bit too intellectual for me". I offer up this arrangement as a non-intellectual birthday gift from a fellow-Scorpio, whose birthday is a week after his.

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  • Demonic Thesis: Dialogos

    Lines, David; Mason Battley, C; Giles, S; Thomas, S; Psathas, J (2015-10-24)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Simple facts

    Samsom, Ronald (2015-12-02)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • This is me

    Evans, Tecwyn; Andersson, S

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Debut Album of Swedish Soprano Susanna Andersson, recorded June 9-12, 2015. Works by Mozart, Vivaldi, Stravinsky, Alfven, Grieg, Delibes, Puccini, Schnelzer.

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