287 results for Creative work

  • 48 hour design challenge Team SoLA: 160 Gloucester Street

    Challenger, Neil P.; Turoa Royal, P.; Garcia Tavaris, S.; Lough, J.; Gilchrist, Erica J.; Bruin, Christopher; Pyne, Laura

    Creative work
    Lincoln University

    The 48hr Design Challenge, run by the Christchurch City Council and held at Lincoln University, provided an opportunity for Council to gain inspiration from the design and architecture industry, while testing the draft Central City Plan currently being developed. The Challenge was a response to the recent earthquakes in Christchurch and brought together local and international talent. A total of 15 teams took part in the Challenge, with seven people in each including engineers, planners, urban designers, architects and landscape architects, as well as one student on each team. The four sites within the Red Zone included the Cathedral Square and BNZ Building; 160 Gloucester Street; the Orion NZ Building at 203 Gloucester Street; and 90 Armagh Street, including the Avon River and Victoria Square. The fifth site, which sits outside the Red Zone, is the former Christchurch Women’s Hospital at 885 Colombo Street. This is team SoLA's entry for 160 Gloucester Street.

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  • In October Light for ensemble of twelve players

    Elmsly, John (2015-11-02)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In October Light was my contribution to an event where nine NZ composers were commissioned by the Stroma ensemble, each to create a tribute celebrating one of the Nine Short Pieces for solo piano by Douglas Lilburn. Premiered 2/11/15 by Stroma, conducted by Hamish McKeich. A video record is available at www.sounz.org.nz

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  • Drei Equali

    Taylor, SM (2011-09-29)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    This is a high quality type-setting of a trombone quartet composed by Beethoven, created using LilyPond software from an old public domain scanned score. The original source was Breitkopf & Härtel, Beethoven Gesamtausgabe, 1862-1865, located on the IMSLP website.

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  • Concerto Auckland; Kufferath, Irons, Salzmann trio

    Irons, D; Kufferath, E; Salzmann, Edith

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Piano trio evening with works by Haydn and Brahms Joseph Haydn, Trio G Major Hob. XV. Elliott Carter, Mnemosyne for violin & Figment IV for viola. Maurice Ravel, Sonata for violin and piano No.2 in G Major. Johannes Brahms, Trio in B Major op.8.

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  • Diptych South

    Febvre-Richards, ER; Merlino, D

    Creative work
    Massey University

    Diptych South is an audiovisual project that explores the physiological effects of the rhythms of colour and music in relation to memory and place. It questions the nature of our memory and connection to place by playing with repetition and difference. The two video pieces for the work are almost identical and are inspired by Febvre-Richards’ regular ‘journeying’ in the New Zealand forest. The repetition of such journeys – the memories and anticipations, the expectation of familiar sensorial experiences – provides rich inspiration for mark making on paper. There is a potentially static nature to this representation, which may convey a momentary sense of place but cannot capture the experiential journey to and through the forest. This problem is ameliorated by the reworking into video form. It is here that the temporal interplay between past as memory plays with the present as experience and the future as anticipation. However, not every experience is identical. To explore the nature of the difference of these temporal experiences, Merlino has provided two contrasting sound pieces that are not juxtaposed with the video work, but rather attempt to show how the experiential sameness of the video actually inspires difference and uniqueness. It is the sameness of our sense of place that inspires a variety of affective responses, thus dispelling the idea that our experiences, when tinged with memory and anticipation, must always remain the same.

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  • Six obstructions [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Le Corbusier's proclamation in 1923 that "a house is a machine for living in" offers a valuable metaphor for discussing architecture as both mass-produced utilitarian object and potent psychological entity. To look upon architecture as a functional object one can examine its place within the mechanisation of society and how ideas of speed and efficiency have found their way into modern urbanisation. Further to this notion of 'architecture-as-machine' is the psychological dissonance of buildings and their influence upon the human condition: the home as machine suggests the occupant has become a cog in an uncanny device. Six Obstructions is an exhibition of models and paintings that examine the intersection of the body with machines, architecture and the environment. Dating from Le Corbusier's statement, and evolving since World War Two, there has been an ongoing interest in architectural paradigms relating to the body. In recent times the advent of nanotechnology has opened the discussion further, heralding a new age of construction. Through an exploration of art historical references and architectural practices, Six Obstructions (Cutting; The Body; Pouring; The Wall; Abstraction and Negation) seeks to address the point at which evolution and entropy take effect. This work has been generously supported by Creative New Zealand.

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  • International Akaroa Music Festival 2015

    Salzmann, E (2016-04-05)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Artistic director, concerts Invited international artists Prof. Alexander Gebert, cello (Hochschule fuer Musik Detmold), Prof. Elisabeth Kufferath, violin (Hochschule fuer Musik, Hannover), Tasana Nagavajara (Dean of strings, Silpakorn University Bangkok) and Caroline Lmonte (University of Melbourne). 48 students attended the masterclasses, with a total of 1360 audience members attending the festival.

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  • 'The selfish gene' exhibited in the National Contemporary Art Award 2014 [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Simon Rees, Judge “I remember looking at dog-shit on the pavement and suddenly I realised, there it is – this is what life is like. Strangely enough it tormented me for months… I think of life as meaningless; but we give meaning during our own existence. We create certain attitudes which give it meaning while we exist, though they in themselves are meaningless, really.” – Francis Bacon, interview with David Sylvester, 1975.

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  • 'Triage' exhibited in the Parkin Drawing Prize 2015 [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Dick Frizzell, Judge

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  • Suicide pavilions [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon; Chon, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Artworks ‘Suicide Pavilions’ is a collaborative exhibition of new work between Auckland-based artists Simon Esling and Clara Chon comprising works on paper, a photograph, printed suicide notes and objects. The suicide pavilions themselves are delicate watercolour, ink, and pencil works on paper depicting contemplative spaces for those who harbour the thought of suicide. Central to these pieces is the idea spoken by the protagonist, Harry, in Herman Hesse’s 'Steppenwolf', ‘that to call suicides only those who actually destroy themselves is false’. Instead, it is the tension within the deliberation of suicide - the avoidance of suicide while holding the thought of it - that Esling and Chon have chosen to explore. The architectural atmosphere of Esling’s imagined illustrations plays on the contrasting aspects of the interior and exterior, and their accompanying structural connotations: lightness, darkness - the flow from one place to another (from one state of mind to the next), as well as their ability to elicit a general ambience or mood. In the drawings and suicide notes (which are both real and imagined) Esling captures those fleeting moments of relief, and inevitably, of falling shadow. The selected sculptural objects suggest something more visceral - they become the tangible points for the physical expression of the psychological friction of the suicide. With its requisite holes and straps, Chon’s crafted leather harness speaks to both the freedom and restraint inherent in the mind of the suicide, where a simultaneous desire exists to be freed from one world, yet remain in it. - Jamie Hanton, Director

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  • architecture e + c work of elin+carmen corneil 1958 to 2008

    Milojevic, Paul

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    architecture e+c work of elin + carmen corneil 1958 to 2008 aims to give a sense of the scope, the composition and the particularity of the Corneil practice archive. From five decades of work and thousands of items, this sampling suggests some of the architects' main preoccupations. Originally proposed by the directors of the Canadian Architectural Archive (University of Calgary) in the late 90's when the material was acquired, the exhibition is meant to bring to light an unusual practice. The work presented shows an engagement in many fields: conceptual, goegraphic, programmatic...

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  • Te Parapara Garden

    Bonica, Dante; Puke, Wiremu

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Te Parapara Garden is the only garden of its type in a major city with traditional structures and food crops that are now extremely rare and outside of a museum setting. Dante played a very important role in almost all facets of the project during the entire duration of project as an adviser and contributor which included: Kokowai advice, preparation and application for all carved structures are believed to be the only structures entirely painted with Kokowai in Aotearoa and outside of a museum setting. The images of carvings attached to this NRO shows kokowai aplication as described from the early accounts. He carved the taumata atua for the tuahu. The patterns carved are from ancient taumatua atua from Waikato. He sourced and gathered obsidian from Taupō for customary usages at Te Parapara including preparing and installing the flaked obsidian eyes for parata-toi moko located at the rear of the pātaka. He prepared all the cordage for the pātaka, whatarangi and ruakūmara. He sourced, gathered and prepared kiekie roots and worked them inot the structural lashings for the pātaka. He sourced, gathered and prepared totara bark for thatching, and employed ancient thatching techiques for the pātaka, kāuta and ruakūmara. He manufactured replica agricultural implements from stone and wood for the māra kūmara He conducted the additional research on traditional lashing techniques to ensure the work's authenticity. He manufactured the feather wig for the tekoteko of the main pātaka. He gave a demonstration of Hika ahi (fire making) as part of the main opening of the Te Parapara Garden.

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  • Paper Plus: A Group Exhibition

    Batty, H; Croucher, J; Esling, Simon; Stichbury, D; Williamson, S; Youle, W

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Paper Plus is a group exhibition featuring works on paper by six New Zealand artists: Hannah Batty, Julia Croucher, Simon Esling, Douglas Stichbury, Shannon Williamson and Wayne Youle.

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  • Blind Glass

    Cherrie, Derrick

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    'Blind Glass' was a collection of works that drew their form and imagery from familiar every-day situations. The works employed a broad array of materials and pre-constructed objects, including: shelving, tables, household objects, sheets of particle board, plastic laminate, fibreglass, mirror and paint. There was a consistent reference throughout the exhibition to the body. The works have the potential to be read as bodily supports (furniture) and body substitutes (physical and psychic). They opened outwardly onto a socially indexed environment and inwardly through personal reflection. Like partial stage sets, the works are presented as traces of scenarios suggesting narrative. However, despite the apparent potential of subjective relations and what might be described a sculptural variant of narrative production, one would be hard put to summarize quite what story has been told. The sculptures occupy what might be described as a zone existing somewhere between the recognisable and familiar matters of their everyday qualities, and an almost dreamlike state of autonomous ideals and semantic absence. A key objective was to have the sculptures open onto a sense of an alterity in opposition to, yet emerging out of, the commonality of their more obvious indices.

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  • Colin McCahon The Titirangi Years 1953-1959

    Simpson, Peter

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This exhibition included examples from all McCahon’s series between 1953 and 1959 including Towards Auckland (1953-54), Manukau (1954), Kauri (1953-57), Titirangi (1956-57), French Bay (1954, 1955, 1956-58), The Wake (1958, 16 panels shown in full) and the Elias Series (1959). It also included significant individual works such as I AM (1954), Let us possess one world (1954-55), Painting (1958), Cross (1959), and John in Canterbury (1959). Displayed in the very environment in which the works were painted, this exhibition enabled an unusually intimate response to McCahon’s painting during a crucial watershed period of his career, when he was first moving beyond landscape regionalism and figurative religious paintings towards more expansive modes influenced by international practice, especially abstraction. The exhibition of 42 works broke records for attendance at Lopdell House and was widely noticed in the media. It was directly associated with the refurbishment of the McCahon house in Titirangi and the establishment of a major residency in McCahon’s name, a project I participated in as Trustee of the McCahon House Trust.

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  • Calls from the Ark, for bass clarinet

    Elmsly, John

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    One of 34 composers selected for this compilation «ShortCuts» – das ist eine bislang einzigartige Sammlung von kurzen Stücken für zwei Klarinetten bzw. Bassklarinetten. Das Kompendium von 34 vielfältigen Miniaturen von Musikschaffenden aus vier Kontinenten der Erde bildet eine Momentaufnahme gegenwärtigen Komponierens. Initiiert wurden die «ShortCuts» von den Klarinettisten Petra Stump und Heinz-Peter Linshalm. Zwanzig dieser Stücke finden sich auf der der Abo-Auflage der Neuen Zeitschrift für Musik beigege benen CD.

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  • Ripped

    Lee, Pei-Jung

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    I feel "it" ripped out of me, hurting and angry, bleeding and feeling empty. But life goes on and I go on with this life "ripped".

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  • White Feathers, for narrator and orchestra

    Elmsly, John

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Premiere public performance

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  • Leo Bensemann: A Fantastic Art Venture

    Simpson, Peter; Waite, N

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This exhibition, eight years in the planning, had the misfortune to open one week before the 22 February 2011 Christchurch earthquake; the exhibition was immediately taken down and never went up again – the Christchurch Art Gallery has still not reopened. Although in my book Fantastica: The World of Leo Bensemann (NRO1) I covered the whole of Bensemann’s career, in the exhibition I took responsibility for the paintings (portraits and landscapes) , while Dr. Noel Waite (University of Otago) looked after Bensemann’s graphic work, book design and printing. This was the most extensive exhibition of Bensemann’s work ever mounted and together with Fantastica will compel a major reassessment of his place in New Zealand culture. Art New Zealand wrote of it: ‘The exhibition (including more than 100 items) is significant in bringing together what has in the past appeared disparate and unrelated; here Bensemann's entire oeuvre - the output of a painter, illustrator, calligrapher, typographer, designer and publisher is given equal billing. Although this exhibition is an important re-assessment and valuable for a new generation unfamiliar with his work, a national touring show would have precipitated an even greater awareness’.

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  • New works on paper (solo exhibition)

    Cherrie, Derrick

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The six works featured in this exhibition were selected from over 20 works, completed late in 2008 and throughout 2009. This exhibition represents the outcome of the first stage of body of creative work through which I intend to investigate the dialectic gap between brute materiality and constructed meaning. That is, (1) how artists manipulate the ‘dumb’ materials of their medium (paint, wood, stone etc.) to produce meaningful forms; and (2) how the resulting meaning goes beyond (transcends) the materials to become the aesthetic basis of a shared culture. This exhibition was the first of a series of exhibitions through which these themes will be explored. This project, in both its expressive methodologies and theoretical underpinnings draws on the exploration of the dialectic of material and meaning initially explored in 1960’s & 70’s in the work of second generation New York School abstract expressionists and neo-dadaist painters such as Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns. Similar themes of relevance to this project are beginning to be explored through a poststructuralist semiotic frame of reference by contemporary artists such as Josh Smith, Isa Genzken, & Jutta Koether.

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