250 results for Creative work

  • North German Organ Music [CD recording]

    Tibbles, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Recording on Ahrend Organ, Monash University, Melbourne

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  • Haydn. Trios for Flute, Cello and Piano Hob. XV:15-17 (M Rummel, cello) [CD recording]

    Rummel, Martin

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Uwe Grodd, flute (soloist) ; Martin Rummel, cello (soloist) ;Christopher Hinterhuber, piano (soloist) CD recording of Haydn, Flute Trios Hob XV;15-17. Digital distribution started in May 2011, physical release October 2011

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  • Cirrus

    Matthews, Stephen (2007)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    My role in the creation of this work was as the composer as well as the provision of complete parts to the NZSO including the addition of the final string bowings The title Cirrus is taken from the first stanza of James K. Baxter’s poem, High Country Weather (1948). Alone we are born And die alone Yet see the red-gold cirrus Over snow mountain shine Upon the upland road Ride easy stranger Surrender to the sky Your heart of anger What appealed was the depiction of individual endeavour, the expansive backdrop of New Zealand rural imagery and the poem’s final plea. Despite the foreboding beginning, metaphorically the ‘red-gold cirrus’ foretells of a change for the better. Cirrus are beautiful high transparent clouds typically streaming in the direction of the wind, usually signalling the arrival of fair weather. The opening of the piece employs high-pitched bell-like chords. While the upper and lower strings hold a sustained note, a bass clarinet introduces the first significant melodic theme. After the first full-orchestral climax the texture of the climax quickly dissipates to reveal a high-pitched modal melody. The brass abruptly interrupts this moment of quiet with an augmentation of the previous theme. After this interruption subsides the character of the music gradually becomes more uplifting and confident. Then solo instruments perform themes over a lively syncopated chromatic pizzicato bass line and variations of the original theme repeat, driving the music forward to reach the final climax. The piece ends with a final recapitulation of the high modal melody and arpeggiated echoes of the opening bell-like chords in the tuned percussion.

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  • Five past five at the Clock Tower: Exploring artistic spaces of the University

    Locke, Kirsten

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This presentation in the form of a concert explores the aesthetic potential of the University of Auckland Clock Tower. Built in the early 20th Century architectural style of art nouveau during the 1920s, the Clock Tower was originally part of the university Arts Centre that officially opened in 1926. Now an administrative hub for staff and students, this concert reclaims the artistic intentions of the space through an a Capella choral performance that explores the notions of temporality and artistry through music. The concert draws on the enduring power of the Clock Tower as the literal heartbeat of the university, the timekeeper, and symbolic nexus of academia, creativity, and cultural power. Consisting of eleven singers drawn from staff at the university, alumni, and keen enthusiasts, we invite you to explore the intersection and artistic transformation of space, place and time at the university with us at Five Past Five at the Clock Tower.

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  • Muddy Urbanism: an LA dialogue

    Waghorn, Kathy; Haringa, H; Jones, R; Khoo, Chia Venn; Seung Kim, Sophia; Lapwood, A; Shake Lee, Z; Lin, S; Paget, V; Ryan, H; Yoo, A; Mecredy, E

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    A piece of collective urban research on the Whau River, Auckland MUDDY URBANISM www.muddyurbanismlab.wordpress.com Auckland, the largest city in New Zealand, has a unique geography, with an extensive coastline abutting urban areas. While architects, planners and politicians often discuss the importance of ‛the waterfront’, the view of this watery edge is frequently restricted to the inner city and the exclusive beach suburbs. However Auckland ‛fronts’ the water in many different ways and spaces, most of which are ignored in an urban sense. One such space is the Whau River estuary. The Whau River bisects the inner west of Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland. Its path creates a portage, connecting two harbours, permitting the movement with waka (canoe) between the east and west coasts. This portage has seen over one thousand years of occupation and use. Pre-colonisation, the Whau was one of the main active frameworks of social connection and economic production and in the colonial economy it played a crucial role in the settlement and urbanisation of Auckland’s west, as both a transport route for food and as a source of clay. In latter decades however, the Whau has lost its importance. No longer a transport route, and for much of the recent past a boundary between municipalities, it has increasingly become the site of multiple conflicts across jurisdictional, economic, land use and natural systems. Muddy Urbanism is a special urban-research workshop at The School of Architecture and Planning (The University of Auckland) that engages in the critical mapping of the Whau in order to visualise the many conflicts that have been hidden from institutional thinking and to propose new interfaces between urban policy, ecological systems and community participation for the regeneration of this catchment. This research project amplifies the local as a critical site of intervention for rethinking existing land use, public and environmental infrastructure, and neighbourhood-based socio-economic development, in order to re-imagine a productive coastline for the many different waterfronts of Auckland.

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  • Flotilla Whau, a work as part of the Rosebank Art Walk, Auckland Arts Festival

    Patel, N; Waghorn, Kathy; Bush, R

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Development of one day participatory event / socially engaged art work for the Rosebank Artwalk, curated by Marcus Williams as part of the Auckland Arts Festival. Commissioned as part of the Rosebank Art Walk (Auckland Arts Festival 2013) the Flotilla Whau was intended as a one-day event where a collection of water-craft traversed a marked course on the Whau river in Auckland, new Zealand. Situated as both art work and community development event, the flotilla brought river users together, stimulating connection and ongoing discussion. The intention of the flotilla was to mark out this marginal estuarine space, in some way drawing attention to it, and in so doing re-establishing the river as a visible,material space that can be occupied, a place one can be in and on. The Flotilla was repeated in 2014 as a stand alone event, with the number of participants increasing from 50 to 300. As a result of the success of these two events the Flotilla Whau was offered funding from Auckland Council for 2015, which allowed for the event to grow the performative spatial and visual components. The 2015 Flotilla Whau took place on Sunday February 8 in collaboration with the Voyager, New Zealand Maritime Museum.

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  • Muddy Urbanism: a project for The Lab at "If you were to live here . . " the 5th Auckland Triennial

    Waghorn, Kathy; Cruz, T; Patel, N; Mecredy, Esther

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    research and curation International curator of the 5th Auckland Triennial Hou Hanru described The Lab as the Triennial’s “intellectual core ( . . .) functioning like a machine of knowledge (. . . ) a kind of brain for the whole project”. The Lab was a joint project of the architecture and spatial design faculties of The University of Auckland, AUT, and UNITEC. Working under the Triennial title “If You Were To Live Here . . . ” the Lab’s role was to act as a catalyst for the critical examination of urban life in Auckland and New Zealand. The Lab physically took form in the Chartwell Gallery at Auckland Art Gallery. The Muddy Urbanism Lab was developed by Kathy Waghorn (University of Auckland) with Triennial and Auckland University guest Teddy Cruz, Professor in Public Culture and Urbanism in the Visual Arts Department at University of California, San Diego, and co-founder of the Center for Urban Ecologies. Working with post-graduate architecture students from the University the research focussed on the Whau River, a tidal waterway bisecting the inner west of Auckland, creating a portage that connects the Waitemat? and Manukau harbours. Pre-colonisation, the Whau was one of the main active frameworks of social connection and economic production along the coastlines of T?maki Makaurau. In the colonial economy it played a crucial role in the settlement and urbanisation of Auckland’s west, as both a transport route and as a source of clay. No longer a transport route, and for much of the recent past a boundary between municipalities, it has increasingly become the site of multiple conflicts across jurisdictional, economic, land use and natural systems. Muddy Urbanism engaged in the critical mapping of the Whau in order to visualise the many conflicts that have been hidden from institutional thinking and to propose new interfaces between urban policy, ecological systems and community participation for the regeneration of this catchment that may be applied across Auckland. The research was presented in large scale prints, models and projections and the Lab became the venue for an associated public programme.

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  • Breathe

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve; Lodge, M; Williams, M; Dowdall, W (2010)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    My electroacoustic work Breathe, commissioned by, and featuring William Dowdall on sliding headjoint-flute was recorded for this Atoll CD collection of new works by NZ and Irish composers

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  • Kammermusikfest Hopfgarten 2016 Eine europäische reise der Kammermusik

    Salzmann, E; Jaffe, R; Schellenberger, H (2017-06-01)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Sutherland Trio: Lies you can believe in

    Salzmann, Edith; Almonte, C; Sellars, E

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Ben Harper

    Samsom, Ronald (2015-12-02)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Tongues of Stone : a Site Sensitive Performance

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Carol Brown - Choreography, Concept and Artistic Direction As a site-sensitive dance-architecture event, Tongues of Stone sought to transform the Central Business District of Perth, Western Australia, into a network of stories experienced through movement, sound and design, drawing attention to forgotten histories and the traumatic residue of colonialisation through performative encounters. Led from the Murray Street underground to the Swan River, the mobile audiences pathway followed an itinerary of lost wetlands and disappeared lakes covered over by urban development and infrastructure. Listening to MP4 recordings on headsets, the soundscape contained traces of three different stories adapted from writings by Ovid, Carol Anne Duffy and Audrey Fernandez-Satar. This collage of interwoven stories obliquely referenced the diverse understandings and temporalities of the city as it is re-imagined through mytho-poetic invention. A woman who has lost her tongue struggles to communicate with her newly wed sister; another reads her body like the map of a city that is both foreign and familiar; a chorus of water-carriers remember and trace tributaries of ancient wetlands; and a girl-band plays their bodies like angry instruments against the concrete facades; a long red dress becomes a tongue and the ancient Wagyl of Nyungar Dreamtime. Tongues of Stone re-imagined Perth as a place of many stories streaming through its streets, laneways and civic sites. As a work of critical engagement with the city it sought to awaken perceptions to the echoes and resonances of subterannean fluids now buried by development, to promote a sense of engagement with urban space that is enchanting and de-familiarising encouraging ecological stewardship whilst empowering the presence of women in the city to transform behaviours and promote new ways of engaging citizenship in civic life.

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  • SLIP I'm not falling I'm just hanging on for as long you'll hold me Dance Theatre Work for Touch Compass

    Brown, Carol; Scoones, R; Ransley, E

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography and Artistic Direction by Carol Brown Music and Sound Design by Russell Scoones Costumes by Emma Ransley What if the stories we carry around with us were to focus upon the contingent and the accidental? What if we acknowledge chance and slippage as our condition? The research imperative was to create a performance work that represented the individual stories of the dancers through movement and text. Using spoken and sung texts the challenge was to create an experience that communicated their inner lives in an unsentimental way. By translating their stories into song and creating a five song cycle for the work the choreography was able to move between the individual and the group opening spaces for an unsentimental appreciation of their diverse experiences whilst seeking to challenge stereotypical assumptions about disability and intellectual impairment. In the process of creating this new work we explored flying and falling and the in-between state of suspension. Driven by a desire to expose the intimacy of support, and the possibilities of surrender, we flung, krumped, collapsed and caught. The dancers wrote titles for an album of songs about life changing moments, they dressed up and down, and danced out of memories, risking everything and still moving beyond the fear of falling. Because the past is all we know of the future, they roll with their ghosts and catch their breath with the other.

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  • On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer (solo exhibition)

    Parekowhai, Michael

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The sculptural installation was exhibited at the 54th Venice Biennale in the Palazzo Loredan dell'Ambasciatore on the Grand Canal. The exhibition title is based on the poem "On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer" by the nineteenth-century English Romantic poet John Keats. In this, Keats describes a Spanish adventurer climbing to the top of a hill in what is now Panama and looking out over the Pacific to survey its potential riches for the first time. The works included one intricately-carved red Steinway concert grand piano and two concert grands fabricated in bronze supporting two cast bronze bulls. On one piano a full-size bull rested on the closed lid with its massive body suggesting the folding forms of landscape. On the other piano the bull stood firm, offering an eye-to-eye challenge for anyone prepared to take a seat at the keyboard. The installation also featured a figure from the Kapa Haka series (Officer Taumaha), two small bronze olive tree saplings (Constitution Hill), and one pair of child-sized bronze crocs. The titles of the works that make up the installation are: He Korero Purakau mo Te Awanui o Te Motu: story of a New Zealand river (the carved piano), A Peak in Darien (the resting bull and piano), and Chapman’s Homer (the standing bull and piano). He Korero Purakau mo Te Awanui o Te Motu Story of a New Zealand River was played throughout the exhibition with a programme of performances by New Zealand and Italian pianists.

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  • that's obvious! that's right! that's true!

    ET AL.

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The collective et al. has exhibited widely both nationally and internationally to great acclaim. This exhibition continues their exploration of 'superfiction' by combining words, industrial furniture and video projections to create artworks that mirror political structures. The collective represented New Zealand at the 2005 Venice Biennale with its critically acclaimed installation the fundamental practice. Recent works have addressed fundamentalist practices and ideological schemes, and their impact on societies. The artists' approach is to use fiction and appropriation to mirror various political and belief structures. The work for Christchurch Art Gallery will continue this process of exploring aspects of super-fiction as conceptual and visual artworks.

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  • Seaunsea : An Interactive Performance

    Brown, Carol; Ramsgard-Thomsen, M; MacDonald, A; Mannion, M; Mottram, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography and Artistic Direction - Carol Brown Architecture and Interactive Design - Mette Ramsgard Thomsen Sound Design - Alastair MacDonald Programming - Chiron Mottram Lighting Design - Michael Mannion Premiered Dance Umbrella London, SeaUnSea was an evolving interactive performance for three dancers moving in response to and affecting a virtual seascape.Core to its development was the making of an intuitive interface through which the dancers could affect and respond to the digital scenography. Using a camera interface, mounted above the stage, the dancers are seen by a swarm of intelligent agents that navigate their way through a virtual space. The agents can be understood as a swarm of digital beings that interact with each other as well as react to changes in their environment. As they seek to navigate the plane, drawn by defined points of attraction, they are hindered by shades of darkness (the dancers digital shadow). In this way ‘the agents’ encounter the performers, at times evading, at times following and at other times being curious about their presence. The digital agents form vivid colour fields, assembling and dissolving creating cloud-like patterns around the performer/participant.Other artists exploring particle streams to extend the trace-form of the dancer include Trisha Brown, however this research as developed in SeaUnSea is original in its extension of this technology through the layering of a mesh architecture which embeds the time-based trace of the dancers’ presence.

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  • Super music

    Kerr, SM

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    I was invited by director of Superdeluxe, Mike Kubek, to perform at Superdeluxe, Tokyo in June 2011. Superdeluxe is Tokyo’s most popular experimental performance space and has hosted major names such as Keiji Haino, Jim O'Rourke and Oren Ambarchi. I performed live, Super Music, which comprised: two laptops, 6 hand built sensor base instruments, and pure data and gem patches, and a 3x data projection. I performed along side local Japanese artists: nonSectRadicals, Cal Lyall (Palimpsest and curator of Test Tone), Nobunaga Ken and Takashi Azumaya, (previous curator of Tokyo's Mori Art Museum).

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  • CMC

    Kerr, Sean; Cuming, S

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    "CMC", LIVE SOUND PERFORMANCE, SUPERDELUXE 17th BIENNALE OF SYDNEY, ARTSPACE, JULY 2ND, 2010 David Elliott, Artistic Director of the 17th Biennale of Sydney (2010), invited Simon Cumming and I to perform in the SuperDeluxe, Artspace program of of the Biennale. The 17th Biennale of Sydney, is a prestigious art event and was curated by artistic director David Elliott. Our performance event took place at Artspace, Sydney and was part of the Tokyo based SuperDeluxe programme coordinated by Mike Kubek, Director of SuperDeluxe. I performed to a capacity crowd with New Zealand sound artist; Simon Cuming and along side Japanese Sound Artists; Kazunao Nagata & Dai Yamamoto.

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  • Te Arikinui for tenor, strings and percussion

    Royal, Charles (2010-04-14)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    WEL Energy Academy of Performing Arts, 14 April 2010, Waikato University, Hamilton. Our thanks to James Tennant. The current version was Zirst performed by the Waikato University Orchestra, conducted by Adam Maha. Howard McGuire, tenor. WEL Energy Academy of Performing Arts, 14 April 2010, Waikato University, Hamilton. Our thanks to James Tennant.

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  • Witnessing Parihaka

    Matthews, Stephen; Sullivan, R (2011)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stephen Matthews - Composer Robert Sullivan - Poet Auckland Readers and Writers Festival 2011

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