250 results for Creative work

  • Six obstructions [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Le Corbusier's proclamation in 1923 that "a house is a machine for living in" offers a valuable metaphor for discussing architecture as both mass-produced utilitarian object and potent psychological entity. To look upon architecture as a functional object one can examine its place within the mechanisation of society and how ideas of speed and efficiency have found their way into modern urbanisation. Further to this notion of 'architecture-as-machine' is the psychological dissonance of buildings and their influence upon the human condition: the home as machine suggests the occupant has become a cog in an uncanny device. Six Obstructions is an exhibition of models and paintings that examine the intersection of the body with machines, architecture and the environment. Dating from Le Corbusier's statement, and evolving since World War Two, there has been an ongoing interest in architectural paradigms relating to the body. In recent times the advent of nanotechnology has opened the discussion further, heralding a new age of construction. Through an exploration of art historical references and architectural practices, Six Obstructions (Cutting; The Body; Pouring; The Wall; Abstraction and Negation) seeks to address the point at which evolution and entropy take effect. This work has been generously supported by Creative New Zealand.

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  • Eyetrackers

    Minissale, Gregory; Lambert, Anthony

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Eyetrackers is a unique fusion of ideas drawn from art and neuroscience. This exhibition is the result of an ongoing conversation between art historian Greg Minissale and cognitive neuroscientist Tony Lambert, in which they have discovered surprising common ground between the visual arts and the visual sciences. In particular, Eyetrackers explores a question that continues to puzzle, fascinate and inspire both artists and scientists alike: How do we see?

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  • Rare Form

    Pritchard, E; Mullins, K; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curators, artist Rare Form brings together a group of artists who work in sculpture, paint, print and assemblage, all of whom pull apart the method and order of art-making. Some works are comprised of many parts while others record a series of actions, and the means of generation or construction is often evident in the finished works. The object, the illusion, the form and the frame are subverted, giving the works a sense of playful intoxication; both the artists and their creations are in rare form.

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  • THE IMAGE AS NOT a celebration of ambiguity and negation

    Baatz, U; Crone, D; Donnelly, M; Dowling, J; Gregory, Nuala; Heron, W; Hill, T; Hooghiemstra, T; Schneider, J

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curator ‘THE IMAGE AS NOT’, is a show dedicated to a celebration of ambiguity and negation, and features the following artists: Uta Baatz, David Crone, Mickey Donnelly, John Dowling, Nuala Gregory, Willie Heron, Tony Hill, Tjibbe Hooghiemstra, Jurgen Schneider.

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  • Dinnseanchas - From New Delhi to the Fountain of the Clouded Sky

    Gregory, NA; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This three-person exhibition was curated by Nuala Gregory (and included her own collages that were collaborations with artists Sarah Treadwell, John Pusateri and Mandy Bonnell). The other two invited artists were Diane Henshaw and Deirdre Mackel. The exhibition consisted of a series of artworks of varying scale, in mixed media on paper, including lithography, gouache paintings, charcoal drawings, and all with elements of collage. The works were arranged to form a themed installation featuring new bodies of work produced in response to the theme of dinnseanchas or ‘poetry of place’. Drawing upon their experiences of very different environments (Auckland, Mayo, Belfast), the artists sought to define a set of relations to place that goes beyond the familiar and the functional. Instead, they attempted to recover a poetic or imagistic way of navigating public and private space, in a co-creation of the lived environment that has roots deep in ancient Irish culture. A modern Irish-English dictionary translates the word dinnseanchas as ‘topography’ (the science of place), but its etymology is quite revealing. The term originally referred to an ancient genre of mythological geography that gave a poetic account of place names. Dinn means place (an eminent site or locale); sean means old, and is strongly associated with the figure of the seanchaí or local storyteller, the keeper of lore and memory; and cas means to twist, as in the twisting of an ankle, but also of a rope. Poetically, the word suggests the twisting together of strands of collective memory of place. Perhaps forming a single narrative core, or (in a more visual idiom) a tapestry weaving together place and people, memory and experience, history and present desire. This tradition, this mnemonic and cognitive practice, was gradually extinguished in Ireland along with the native language, but has been ‘reclaimed’ in recent years particularly by the work of poets such as Seamus Heaney, Paul Muldoon and Ciaran Carson. In this exhibition, the artists have expressed the spirit of dinnseanchas in a modern idiom, as a ‘cognitive-imaginative mapping’ of the environment through forms of artistic engagement. Not so much by naming or storytelling, or acts of linguistic commemoration, but by marking and investing, revealing or creating new ways of seeing the landscape or cityscape – ways that can help overcome our habitual blindness, born of the pressures of time and work and commercial imperatives.

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  • The Masters

    Grodd, Uwe

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conductor THE MASTERS - D Taylor Soliloquy for D Lilburn 'World Premier'*; Elgar Cello concerto; Brahms Symphony No 1 , op.68

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  • HANDEL Israel in Egypt; Atchison, Fong, Sky-lucas, Latu, Wilson, Kubiak; University of Auckland Symphony Orchestra, Auckland Choral

    Grodd, Uwe

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conductor

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  • From Distant Shores - Aotea Flute Quartet; Walckiers, Jongen, Elmsly 'World Premier', Mozart, Bozza, Piazolla

    Grodd, Uwe

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    performers, radio boradcasters

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  • BEETHOVEN Missa Solemnis

    Grodd, Uwe

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Conductor

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  • Bridging the Wind

    Koo, Sun

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Come along to experience the enchanting and contemplative sounds of three traditional Korean instruments; the Daegeum, Gayageum and Geomungo. Featuring repertoire of both traditional and contemporary compositions, 'Bridging the Wind' promises to be an enjoyable demonstration of the sounds of Korea by three visiting Professors Suh Seungmi, Choi Jin and Cho Kyongsun.

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  • host for SATB choir

    de Castro-Robinson, Eve (2015-06-01)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Eve de Castro-Robinson: composer of the original composition Robert Wiremu: conductor I was delighted to be asked to write host for Karen Grylls’ Auckland Chamber Choir. My first choral work written at her request was Chaos of delight III, a vocal soundscape of avian sonorities for women’s voices. host is also abstract, based not on a text, but on the Vowel Clock used to train choral singers. The whole work is based on the note A and its upper partials and as the singers move around the space, various harmonics from the chord are heard. The title refers to the movement of birds in formation, often called a host. Commissioned by Robert Wiremu for Karen Grylls's 30 year anniversary conducting the Auckland Chamber Choir

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  • FLOOD in NZPQ15: Āhua o te Rangi, Prague Quadrennial of Performance Design and Space International Exhibition of Countries and Regions

    Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Erceg, L; Brown, Carol

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography by Carol Brown; performance design by Dorita Hannah; sound design by Russell Scoones; sculptural objects by Linda Erceg. Influenced by Maori and Pacific sacred places (marae), the Ahua o Te Rangi installation serves as an interaction, negotiation and display space that operates as an architecture piece, audiovisual media-site, live performance stage and dialogue exchange platform. FLOOD, the live performance, is re-presented within the exhibition through a video installation and sculptural form.

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  • Assemblages

    Mackel, D; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Mackel, D., collaborator Over the past three years both artists have worked collaboratively in an installation format under the broad theme of landscapes of the past. For this exhibition, Deirdre Mackel has produced an installation entitled ‘Accidental Gardens 2’. It consists of a child-like garden made from an enclosure of miniature barbed wire fences, and toy gardening tools, including elements of Nuala Gregory’s flower works and small sculptures or ‘shelves’, assembled together allowing for the combination and interplay of ideas and materials derived from two locations. Deirdre references her remembered landscapes of growing up in West Belfast throughout the conflict and Nuala responds with objects representing those commonly found in the earth - old bottles delicately embellished with buttercups and daisies, combining them with lemon wood blocks to reference her current landscape of New Zealand. This assemblage of objects, symbolises the way things are thrown together in chaotic metropolitan space, forming accidental relations among which new possibilities might yet be glimpsed.

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  • Opera Scenes

    Camp, Gregory

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Gregory Camp, director The University of Auckland School of Music voice class presents a series of scenes from a variety of operas, directed by Dr Gregory Camp.

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  • International Akaroa Music Festival 2015

    Salzmann, E (2016-04-05)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Artistic director, concerts Invited international artists Prof. Alexander Gebert, cello (Hochschule fuer Musik Detmold), Prof. Elisabeth Kufferath, violin (Hochschule fuer Musik, Hannover), Tasana Nagavajara (Dean of strings, Silpakorn University Bangkok) and Caroline Lmonte (University of Melbourne). 48 students attended the masterclasses, with a total of 1360 audience members attending the festival.

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  • FLUTE FEST 2016; Baroque Architecture and Music in Italy, France and Germany; Dr Ross Jenner speaker; Uwe Grodd flute

    Grodd, Uwe

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Performance; Vivaldi 'Il pastor fido' Sonata for flute and harpsichord; M Marais 'Les Folies D'espagne' for solo flute; W F Bach Sonata in Fa major for two flutes Performance; Vivaldi 'Il pastor fido' Sonata for flute and harpsichord; M Marais 'Les Folies D'espagne' for solo flute; W F Bach Sonata in Fa major for two flutes

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  • Restless Idiom: A mini-survey of Cousins recent work. Made between 2009-2015.

    Cousins, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cousins, J., artist, Gordon-Smith, I., curator James Cousins’ practice pivots around questions of how a painting might function: how do we understand the status of an image? What systems guide our understanding? What processes could be used to disrupt these assumptions? Restless Idiom is a mini-survey of Cousins recent work. Made between 2009-2015, the exhibited works combine what might otherwise be perceived as contradictory painting concerns: the figurative and the abstract: the illusory and the material. These oppositional qualities are unified to create an optical instability, prompting the eye to constantly move between the representations of familiar flora and fauna images as perceived from afar, and the abstractions of colour and geometry when viewed up close. The result calls into question the certainty of representational conventions. By placing the image into an equilibrial tension with the material effects of particular processes, Cousins creates a fresh encounter with what painting might be and provokes a heightened consciousness of the very act of looking.

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  • 'The selfish gene' exhibited in the National Contemporary Art Award 2014 [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Simon Rees, Judge “I remember looking at dog-shit on the pavement and suddenly I realised, there it is – this is what life is like. Strangely enough it tormented me for months… I think of life as meaningless; but we give meaning during our own existence. We create certain attitudes which give it meaning while we exist, though they in themselves are meaningless, really.” – Francis Bacon, interview with David Sylvester, 1975.

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  • 'Triage' exhibited in the Parkin Drawing Prize 2015 [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Dick Frizzell, Judge

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  • Future Islands: New Zealand Exhibition, Venice Architecture Biennale 2016

    Waghorn, Kathy; Walker, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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