275 results for Creative work

  • The will of the people is law

    Jack, Fiona

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    From the catalogue text by Michael Ned Holte: Fiona Jack is an artist working in Auckland, New Zealand. Driven by research and dialogue, her work often explores the social space of political action, and she frequently draws upon collaboration in and with specific communities. The 2014 exhibition ???The Heraldry of Presence,??? at Auckland???s Fresh Gallery ?tara, consisted entirely of banners???some made by the artist based on historical protest signs, others borrowed from community groups or produced in collaboration with them. ???Banners can be disquiet, or celebratory,??? Gwyneth Porter argues in an essay on Jack. ???A banner, at a basic level, indicates the formation of a crowd, and a crowd suggests numbers of people that are too many to be a comfortable thing. A crowd is something that is big enough to make it hard to count it quickly, or at all, like a group of sparrows feeding. A group speaks of a collective and therefore a higher purpose; of a constituency or fellowship or conscience that is large enough to have power by virtue of its sheer force of volition.??? The subject of Jack???s presentation at Commonwealth & Council follows from a single banner in ???The Heraldry of Presence??? exhibition that reads, in emphatic all-caps, ???THE WILL OF THE PEOPLE IS LAW.??? The banner follows from a placard seen in a photograph of women marching in the 1915 rent strikes in Glasgow. The image carries personal history for the artist: Her great aunt Helen Crawfurd was one of the key organizers of the strikes. But divorced from this specific origin it becomes possible for the phrase to be read in a variety of cultural or geographical contexts, reflecting popular sentiment on either side of the political spectrum. Here, the banner is made and remade, and in the force or absurdity of that repetition the phrase reveals its allegorical potential in the present???or even in the future.

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  • A stitch in time

    Jack, Fiona; Van Zon, E; Orjis, R; Munro, V; Arps, D; O'Neill, A; Hickman, Yolunda; Hurley, G; Fitts, E

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    A curated group exhibition featuring work by artists working with textiles, ???A Stitch in Time??? brings together the work of nine artists exploring textiles in very different ways???. Includes work by ERICA VAN ZON, RICHARD ORJIS, VICTORIA MUNRO, DAN ARPS, FIONA JACK, ANI O'NEILL, YOLUNDA HICKMAN, GAVIN HURLEY and EMMA FITTS. ... FIONA JACK presents a selection of recent banner works that are witty, lyrical and thought provoking all at the same time. ???One of the banners???repeats the word ???tiresome??? over and over again in a cursive script. It has been appropriated from a child???s workbook Jack found in Taranaki. A child had been given the task of repeating certain words to develop her hand, and she had, in an apparent act of self-love, made a space for her own feelings in this labour.??? (Gwynneth Porter, The Heraldry of Presence exhibition catalogue, Fresh Gallery Otara, 2014). The other work takes its cue from Christchurch based artist Bill Sutton???s journals where in 1922 he wrote - ???When I have my breakfast, I cut off a slice of bread for myself and one for the birds. We are all in it together.??? Gwynneth Porter describes Jack???s work as ??????a practise that involves observation, and indexes something fleeting. There is also the direct repurposing of forms of presentation, and the desire to mediate on change and social cost??? (Gweneth Porter, ibid. 2014).

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  • Anzac Centenary print portfolio

    Jack, Fiona; Spong, S; Graham, B; Cotton, S; Reynolds, J; Boyd, D; Cope, M; Parr, M; Johnson, H; Sandrasegar, S

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Based in Auckland, Fiona Jack works across a range of media, undertaking archival research and collaborating with various communities around New Zealand to examine social histories. The prints in this portfolio were commissioned as an edition of 20; however each of Jack???s prints is a unique print. Stretching across a white expanse of 20 sheets is a survivors??? roll of honour. When thinking about family stories from both the First and Second World Wars Jack realised that ???in our large extended family everyone known to me survived???. Growing up she had not recognised the significance of this or appreciated it as a blessing. Tales of traumatised and damaged people returning home carried an emotional weight, and Jack was conscious that while ???they hadn???t made the ???ultimate sacrifice??? their experience was beyond anything I could imagine ??? yet none of them were on any national roll of honour???. In contrast to Australia, it was unusual for the names of First World War survivors to be listed on New Zealand memorials, and there was no complete list of those who served and survived. While it may appear to be a simple list, this singularly exhaustive roll of New Zealanders who fought in and survived the war was painstakingly assembled by Jack in collaboration with historian Phil Lascelles. It remains ???the first and most complete list??? of New Zealand First World War survivors to date, comprising 108,920 names compiled from original embarkation lists and extensive research.

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  • Whare Tapere 2011

    Royal, Charles

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This day long event is a series of performances demonstrating the outcomes of experiments in m??tauranga M??ori inspired perfomring arts. It contains demonstrations of taonga p??oro, t??karo karetao, haka, waiata and k??rero.

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  • NZ Youth Choir: Guest recital (Recital conductor)

    Grylls, Karen

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Gro??e Reihe, G??ttinger Symphonie Orchester

    Rummel, Martin; Lange, P

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • 48 hour design challenge Team SoLA: 160 Gloucester Street

    Challenger, Neil P.; Turoa Royal, P.; Garcia Tavaris, S.; Lough, J.; Gilchrist, Erica J.; Bruin, Christopher; Pyne, Laura

    Creative work
    Lincoln University

    The 48hr Design Challenge, run by the Christchurch City Council and held at Lincoln University, provided an opportunity for Council to gain inspiration from the design and architecture industry, while testing the draft Central City Plan currently being developed. The Challenge was a response to the recent earthquakes in Christchurch and brought together local and international talent. A total of 15 teams took part in the Challenge, with seven people in each including engineers, planners, urban designers, architects and landscape architects, as well as one student on each team. The four sites within the Red Zone included the Cathedral Square and BNZ Building; 160 Gloucester Street; the Orion NZ Building at 203 Gloucester Street; and 90 Armagh Street, including the Avon River and Victoria Square. The fifth site, which sits outside the Red Zone, is the former Christchurch Women’s Hospital at 885 Colombo Street. This is team SoLA's entry for 160 Gloucester Street.

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  • In October Light for ensemble of twelve players

    Elmsly, John (2015-11-02)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In October Light was my contribution to an event where nine NZ composers were commissioned by the Stroma ensemble, each to create a tribute celebrating one of the Nine Short Pieces for solo piano by Douglas Lilburn. Premiered 2/11/15 by Stroma, conducted by Hamish McKeich. A video record is available at www.sounz.org.nz

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  • Undrowned

    Richards, JGR

    Creative work
    Massey University

    Undrowned is a creative response to performing in Sally J Morgan’s In the Hollow of Your Hand as part of Deep Anatomy/Fluid States, 2015.

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  • Drei Equali

    Taylor, SM (2011-09-29)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    This is a high quality type-setting of a trombone quartet composed by Beethoven, created using LilyPond software from an old public domain scanned score. The original source was Breitkopf & Härtel, Beethoven Gesamtausgabe, 1862-1865, located on the IMSLP website.

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  • Concerto Auckland; Kufferath, Irons, Salzmann trio

    Irons, D; Kufferath, E; Salzmann, Edith

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Piano trio evening with works by Haydn and Brahms Joseph Haydn, Trio G Major Hob. XV. Elliott Carter, Mnemosyne for violin & Figment IV for viola. Maurice Ravel, Sonata for violin and piano No.2 in G Major. Johannes Brahms, Trio in B Major op.8.

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  • Diptych South

    Febvre-Richards, ER; Merlino, D

    Creative work
    Massey University

    Diptych South is an audiovisual project that explores the physiological effects of the rhythms of colour and music in relation to memory and place. It questions the nature of our memory and connection to place by playing with repetition and difference. The two video pieces for the work are almost identical and are inspired by Febvre-Richards’ regular ‘journeying’ in the New Zealand forest. The repetition of such journeys – the memories and anticipations, the expectation of familiar sensorial experiences – provides rich inspiration for mark making on paper. There is a potentially static nature to this representation, which may convey a momentary sense of place but cannot capture the experiential journey to and through the forest. This problem is ameliorated by the reworking into video form. It is here that the temporal interplay between past as memory plays with the present as experience and the future as anticipation. However, not every experience is identical. To explore the nature of the difference of these temporal experiences, Merlino has provided two contrasting sound pieces that are not juxtaposed with the video work, but rather attempt to show how the experiential sameness of the video actually inspires difference and uniqueness. It is the sameness of our sense of place that inspires a variety of affective responses, thus dispelling the idea that our experiences, when tinged with memory and anticipation, must always remain the same.

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  • Life Size

    Richards, JGR

    Creative work
    Massey University

    Commissioned piece of creative autobiographical writing produced for the Ardtornish Retreat in partnership with Scottish Book Trust 2014. The text is thematically focused on 'love' and actively searches for the 'magical' within the natural world, using metaphor and imagery from the geographically isolated location. (The Ardtornish Estate on the Morvern Peninsula in the Scottish Highlands.)

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  • Polymer Monoliths

    Robinson, Peter

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    New Zealand artist Peter Robinson was last seen at the IMA in 2005, exhibiting alongside Gordon Bennett in the exhibition Three Colours. There he offered his sceptical take on post-colonial art-and-identity politics. His recent work, however, leaves such issues behind, in what seems like an abruptly formalist about-face. He has moved away from illustrating political, scientific, and philosophical ideas, and toward playing with materials and exploring the resulting poetic nuances. He's been working with polystyrene—that mundane, everyday material of consumer excess. A non-biodegradable thermo-plastic, it cushions our electronic goods in transit and pollutes our foreshores. In Robinson's work, it is also a sculptural material of infinite possibility—lightweight yet massive, able to fill large spaces yet also to articulate delicate forms. Robinson pursues multiple lines of inquiry, as if, given polystyrene's association with disposability, any number of sculptural experiments could be explored, cast aside, and reworked. His work ranges from roughly hewn, lumpen forms to intricately carved, baroque ones. In our show, Robinson continues his recent exploration of the monolith. In conjunction with Artspace, Sydney; supported by Creative New Zealand, University of Auckland, and Brisbane's Urban Art Projects.

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  • On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer (solo exhibition)

    Parekowhai, Michael

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The sculptural installation was exhibited at the 54th Venice Biennale in the Palazzo Loredan dell'Ambasciatore on the Grand Canal. The exhibition title is based on the poem "On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer" by the nineteenth-century English Romantic poet John Keats. In this, Keats describes a Spanish adventurer climbing to the top of a hill in what is now Panama and looking out over the Pacific to survey its potential riches for the first time. The works included one intricately-carved red Steinway concert grand piano and two concert grands fabricated in bronze supporting two cast bronze bulls. On one piano a full-size bull rested on the closed lid with its massive body suggesting the folding forms of landscape. On the other piano the bull stood firm, offering an eye-to-eye challenge for anyone prepared to take a seat at the keyboard. The installation also featured a figure from the Kapa Haka series (Officer Taumaha), two small bronze olive tree saplings (Constitution Hill), and one pair of child-sized bronze crocs. The titles of the works that make up the installation are: He Korero Purakau mo Te Awanui o Te Motu: story of a New Zealand river (the carved piano), A Peak in Darien (the resting bull and piano), and Chapman’s Homer (the standing bull and piano). He Korero Purakau mo Te Awanui o Te Motu Story of a New Zealand River was played throughout the exhibition with a programme of performances by New Zealand and Italian pianists.

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  • Te Arikinui for tenor, strings and percussion

    Royal, Charles (2010-04-14)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    WEL Energy Academy of Performing Arts, 14 April 2010, Waikato University, Hamilton. Our thanks to James Tennant. The current version was Zirst performed by the Waikato University Orchestra, conducted by Adam Maha. Howard McGuire, tenor. WEL Energy Academy of Performing Arts, 14 April 2010, Waikato University, Hamilton. Our thanks to James Tennant.

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  • Six obstructions [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Le Corbusier's proclamation in 1923 that "a house is a machine for living in" offers a valuable metaphor for discussing architecture as both mass-produced utilitarian object and potent psychological entity. To look upon architecture as a functional object one can examine its place within the mechanisation of society and how ideas of speed and efficiency have found their way into modern urbanisation. Further to this notion of 'architecture-as-machine' is the psychological dissonance of buildings and their influence upon the human condition: the home as machine suggests the occupant has become a cog in an uncanny device. Six Obstructions is an exhibition of models and paintings that examine the intersection of the body with machines, architecture and the environment. Dating from Le Corbusier's statement, and evolving since World War Two, there has been an ongoing interest in architectural paradigms relating to the body. In recent times the advent of nanotechnology has opened the discussion further, heralding a new age of construction. Through an exploration of art historical references and architectural practices, Six Obstructions (Cutting; The Body; Pouring; The Wall; Abstraction and Negation) seeks to address the point at which evolution and entropy take effect. This work has been generously supported by Creative New Zealand.

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  • Eyetrackers

    Minissale, Gregory; Lambert, Anthony

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Eyetrackers is a unique fusion of ideas drawn from art and neuroscience. This exhibition is the result of an ongoing conversation between art historian Greg Minissale and cognitive neuroscientist Tony Lambert, in which they have discovered surprising common ground between the visual arts and the visual sciences. In particular, Eyetrackers explores a question that continues to puzzle, fascinate and inspire both artists and scientists alike: How do we see?

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  • Rare Form

    Pritchard, E; Mullins, K; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curators, artist Rare Form brings together a group of artists who work in sculpture, paint, print and assemblage, all of whom pull apart the method and order of art-making. Some works are comprised of many parts while others record a series of actions, and the means of generation or construction is often evident in the finished works. The object, the illusion, the form and the frame are subverted, giving the works a sense of playful intoxication; both the artists and their creations are in rare form.

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  • THE IMAGE AS NOT a celebration of ambiguity and negation

    Baatz, U; Crone, D; Donnelly, M; Dowling, J; Gregory, Nuala; Heron, W; Hill, T; Hooghiemstra, T; Schneider, J

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curator ‘THE IMAGE AS NOT’, is a show dedicated to a celebration of ambiguity and negation, and features the following artists: Uta Baatz, David Crone, Mickey Donnelly, John Dowling, Nuala Gregory, Willie Heron, Tony Hill, Tjibbe Hooghiemstra, Jurgen Schneider.

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