272 results for Creative work

  • Dinnseanchas - From New Delhi to the Fountain of the Clouded Sky

    Gregory, NA; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This three-person exhibition was curated by Nuala Gregory (and included her own collages that were collaborations with artists Sarah Treadwell, John Pusateri and Mandy Bonnell). The other two invited artists were Diane Henshaw and Deirdre Mackel. The exhibition consisted of a series of artworks of varying scale, in mixed media on paper, including lithography, gouache paintings, charcoal drawings, and all with elements of collage. The works were arranged to form a themed installation featuring new bodies of work produced in response to the theme of dinnseanchas or ‘poetry of place’. Drawing upon their experiences of very different environments (Auckland, Mayo, Belfast), the artists sought to define a set of relations to place that goes beyond the familiar and the functional. Instead, they attempted to recover a poetic or imagistic way of navigating public and private space, in a co-creation of the lived environment that has roots deep in ancient Irish culture. A modern Irish-English dictionary translates the word dinnseanchas as ‘topography’ (the science of place), but its etymology is quite revealing. The term originally referred to an ancient genre of mythological geography that gave a poetic account of place names. Dinn means place (an eminent site or locale); sean means old, and is strongly associated with the figure of the seanchaí or local storyteller, the keeper of lore and memory; and cas means to twist, as in the twisting of an ankle, but also of a rope. Poetically, the word suggests the twisting together of strands of collective memory of place. Perhaps forming a single narrative core, or (in a more visual idiom) a tapestry weaving together place and people, memory and experience, history and present desire. This tradition, this mnemonic and cognitive practice, was gradually extinguished in Ireland along with the native language, but has been ‘reclaimed’ in recent years particularly by the work of poets such as Seamus Heaney, Paul Muldoon and Ciaran Carson. In this exhibition, the artists have expressed the spirit of dinnseanchas in a modern idiom, as a ‘cognitive-imaginative mapping’ of the environment through forms of artistic engagement. Not so much by naming or storytelling, or acts of linguistic commemoration, but by marking and investing, revealing or creating new ways of seeing the landscape or cityscape – ways that can help overcome our habitual blindness, born of the pressures of time and work and commercial imperatives.

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  • Bridging the Wind

    Koo, Sun

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Come along to experience the enchanting and contemplative sounds of three traditional Korean instruments; the Daegeum, Gayageum and Geomungo. Featuring repertoire of both traditional and contemporary compositions, 'Bridging the Wind' promises to be an enjoyable demonstration of the sounds of Korea by three visiting Professors Suh Seungmi, Choi Jin and Cho Kyongsun.

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  • Assemblages

    Mackel, D; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Mackel, D., collaborator Over the past three years both artists have worked collaboratively in an installation format under the broad theme of landscapes of the past. For this exhibition, Deirdre Mackel has produced an installation entitled ‘Accidental Gardens 2’. It consists of a child-like garden made from an enclosure of miniature barbed wire fences, and toy gardening tools, including elements of Nuala Gregory’s flower works and small sculptures or ‘shelves’, assembled together allowing for the combination and interplay of ideas and materials derived from two locations. Deirdre references her remembered landscapes of growing up in West Belfast throughout the conflict and Nuala responds with objects representing those commonly found in the earth - old bottles delicately embellished with buttercups and daisies, combining them with lemon wood blocks to reference her current landscape of New Zealand. This assemblage of objects, symbolises the way things are thrown together in chaotic metropolitan space, forming accidental relations among which new possibilities might yet be glimpsed.

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  • International Akaroa Music Festival 2015

    Salzmann, E (2016-04-05)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Artistic director, concerts Invited international artists Prof. Alexander Gebert, cello (Hochschule fuer Musik Detmold), Prof. Elisabeth Kufferath, violin (Hochschule fuer Musik, Hannover), Tasana Nagavajara (Dean of strings, Silpakorn University Bangkok) and Caroline Lmonte (University of Melbourne). 48 students attended the masterclasses, with a total of 1360 audience members attending the festival.

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  • Restless Idiom: A mini-survey of Cousins recent work. Made between 2009-2015.

    Cousins, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cousins, J., artist, Gordon-Smith, I., curator James Cousins’ practice pivots around questions of how a painting might function: how do we understand the status of an image? What systems guide our understanding? What processes could be used to disrupt these assumptions? Restless Idiom is a mini-survey of Cousins recent work. Made between 2009-2015, the exhibited works combine what might otherwise be perceived as contradictory painting concerns: the figurative and the abstract: the illusory and the material. These oppositional qualities are unified to create an optical instability, prompting the eye to constantly move between the representations of familiar flora and fauna images as perceived from afar, and the abstractions of colour and geometry when viewed up close. The result calls into question the certainty of representational conventions. By placing the image into an equilibrial tension with the material effects of particular processes, Cousins creates a fresh encounter with what painting might be and provokes a heightened consciousness of the very act of looking.

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  • 'The selfish gene' exhibited in the National Contemporary Art Award 2014 [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Simon Rees, Judge “I remember looking at dog-shit on the pavement and suddenly I realised, there it is – this is what life is like. Strangely enough it tormented me for months… I think of life as meaningless; but we give meaning during our own existence. We create certain attitudes which give it meaning while we exist, though they in themselves are meaningless, really.” – Francis Bacon, interview with David Sylvester, 1975.

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  • 'Triage' exhibited in the Parkin Drawing Prize 2015 [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Dick Frizzell, Judge

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  • Lisa Brady & Micky Kilfeather exhibition: New Works

    Gregory, Nuala; Smyth, J

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    These new works by Lisa Brady clearly situate themselves within the broad context of modernist abstract painting. But not without a certain irony, a conscious taking-of-distance. This reveals itself in her choice of materials and work processes, and leads to paintings that manage to appear visually self-contained (quietly at ease with themselves) whilst engaging in a subtle play of identity and the political.

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  • Ideal City today : Students from the School of Architecture and Planning

    Manfredini, Manfredo

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Invited contribution to the exhibition during 2016 Auckland Art Festival

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  • Signal

    Cousins, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Gow Langsford Gallery is pleased to present Signal: an exhibition of new work by James Cousins. His inaugural show with Gow Langsford, Cousins presents a body of painting that both draws from and expands on concepts explored in his earlier practice. Aligned with his early grid-based and recurring image works of the 1990s, Cousins recent work employs well-worn distant utopian landscape imagery, informed by the practice of Gerhard Richter, at the same time engaging with mechanistic-like process painting forging an entirely contemporary shift. At the heart of the works is a tension in the tenuous integration between the meeting of paintings material workings process and its illusional subject. Cousins earlier works offered a strong differentiation between the figurative, and the object, the filter or screen through which we are drawn to view the work. The new pieces introduce a more complex type of emergence: here, the abstraction and figuration are intertwined and enmeshed. Irresolvable tensions arise between the original form and the surface. Cousins states: The grid, once submissive to horizontality and verticality, now maps multiple events; the canvas is now a site of indeterminacy brimming with possibilitieswhilst continuing to exercise a form of homage to late modernist practices and processes, recent work exchanges end game reductivism for other possibilites. Morphed or corrupted logic reinvent the processes inherent in earlier work with a new divergence and opulence. Cousins process in creating the works employs both traditional and contemporary painting technologies. It is a labour-intensive, delicate and precise working of layers of paint and vinyl. A path of paint, created by the tipped canvas, initially determines the foreground pattern of large arcs. As such, the works are to a degree, self-determining. What appears to be entirely mechanistic is instead, a more complex mapping of the surface. The vinyl employed in this process, creates an artificial skin which is later peeled away to reveal the layers of paint beneath. While passages through to the background picturesque in the works can be glimpsed, the surface patterns of fractured colour seemingly form a wrinkle in the matrix and force the viewer into a double take. Though this process may be learned, the procedures employed at various levels fuse and begin to impose upon each other, reversing and exchanging established order. The un-learned order of the finished works create a mysterious and contemplative effect, evocative of a once necessarily romantic sublime that in a new age has collapsed in upon itself, promised utopias are exposed as a sham, in the construction of space for other beginnings.

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  • A Bridge to Somewhere: Jazz Perspectives of Auckland (recording)

    Thwaites, Trevor (2011-08)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The CD comprises nine Trevor Thwaites compositions, including “Jazz Waiata” performed by Bruce Morley’s Emergency Exit Band, “Millenium Samba” and title track “A Bridge to Somewhere” performed by jazz trio Crystal Silence, and a number of tunes that feature sax and flute player Jim Langabeer. Trevor plays vibraphone, drums and or percussion on all tracks.

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  • Suicide pavilions [Exhibition]

    Esling, Simon; Chon, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Artworks ‘Suicide Pavilions’ is a collaborative exhibition of new work between Auckland-based artists Simon Esling and Clara Chon comprising works on paper, a photograph, printed suicide notes and objects. The suicide pavilions themselves are delicate watercolour, ink, and pencil works on paper depicting contemplative spaces for those who harbour the thought of suicide. Central to these pieces is the idea spoken by the protagonist, Harry, in Herman Hesse’s 'Steppenwolf', ‘that to call suicides only those who actually destroy themselves is false’. Instead, it is the tension within the deliberation of suicide - the avoidance of suicide while holding the thought of it - that Esling and Chon have chosen to explore. The architectural atmosphere of Esling’s imagined illustrations plays on the contrasting aspects of the interior and exterior, and their accompanying structural connotations: lightness, darkness - the flow from one place to another (from one state of mind to the next), as well as their ability to elicit a general ambience or mood. In the drawings and suicide notes (which are both real and imagined) Esling captures those fleeting moments of relief, and inevitably, of falling shadow. The selected sculptural objects suggest something more visceral - they become the tangible points for the physical expression of the psychological friction of the suicide. With its requisite holes and straps, Chon’s crafted leather harness speaks to both the freedom and restraint inherent in the mind of the suicide, where a simultaneous desire exists to be freed from one world, yet remain in it. - Jamie Hanton, Director

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  • Boundless: Printmaking beyond the frame

    Allender, R; Hutchins-Pond, M; Allen, B (2017-08-21)

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Parts, Fillings, Cuttings is one of a series of experimental works positioned at the boundaries of contemporary printmaking. As the title implies, it was constructed using a combination of techniques from the traditions of chine collé, wood inlay and painting. It was also produced collaboratively, as part of an artistic partnership between Rick Allender and Nuala Gregory. Allender specialises in contemporary marquetry, employing wood veneers. Gregory has been integrating chine collé and lithography since 2009. Among the material and aesthetic influences on these works are Eastern lacquer effects, with their heightened colours, depth and luminosity, and the predella formats of 16th Century European altarpieces and ceilings with their contrasts of style and assemblages of parts. Above all, the works are distinguished by an underlying emphasis on construction and the unforced emergence of form and meaning. Allender draws on his love of the natural world, particularly forests and the sea, and the need for their protection and preservation. Gregory’s practice focuses on the sensuous particularities to be encountered in everyday experiences. By pushing at the limits of traditional mediums, these works provide an indication of what might yet be possible, what might yet emerge and flourish in our world, with our care and thoughtful participation.

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  • Sensitive Buildings

    Rieger, Harald Klaus

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • many-to-many

    ET AL

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Michael Parekowhai et al

    ET AL.; Parekowhai, M; Holloway, S; Henis, A

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • When will the present begin?

    Gregory, Nuala; various

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This exhibition consisted of a series of lithographs and selected objects by Nuala Gregory mixed with works by other invited artists. This unusual combination is presented in the form of an installation containing references to the history of art and to art’s place in society. Installation, perhaps pre-eminently among the art forms, captures the idea of things thrown together in the chaos and happenstance of modern life. In this case, an assembly of prints and paintings is structured around a neon sign and a chair, two tokens of the difference or the gap between art and the social. The neon sign (Bar Zacatecas) invokes the space of a public bar in Mexico in which art and leisure are strategically mixed together. People are surrounded by banks of small paintings covering the walls and suspended (most impressively) from the series of wooden rafters on the ceiling. The paintings form part of the décor of the bar, in which they are mixed with various functional but clearly aestheticised objects – mirrors, lamps, stained glass windows, bottles, wrought iron chairs – supplemented by paper decorations, skulls, puppets and dolls … As the bar fills with people, this creates a kind of living installation in which art is de-sanctified and serves as a point of spontaneous, unpredictable conversation (or discursive participation) rather than formal contemplation. The chair refers back to an event in the early history of modernist art: 0,10 (Zero-Ten). The Last Futurist Exhibition of Painting held in Petrograd, 1915. A famous photograph of Malevich’s work for the exhibition [figure 2] focuses on his Black Square, mounted high up in the ‘red corner’ so that it faces down into and across the entire space of the gallery. The red corner was the space reserved by Russian peasants for the placement of sacred icons. By his repudiation of imagery and strategic act of positioning, Malevich aimed not just at ‘the degree zero of form’ in painting but its replacement by an art of spiritual depth and genuine social utility. Almost directly below the Black Square, unremarked by art historians, was a type of ‘accidental artwork’ – a chair, probably placed there for the benefit of the person whose job it was to protect the exhibited works from damage or theft. Oddly, the chair looks as if it forms part of the installation, in which its purpose is to confront the audience with a silent challenge (who are you; and what do you make of all of this stuff on the walls?) or to invite them to ‘sit in on’ whatever the art is doing. These two references, social and historical, were brought together in the current exhibition. Each, in its way, recalls us to the social dimension of art (so often suppressed by the white cube of the gallery space) and the possible construction of communal or collective meaning. The title When Will the Present Begin? raises a simple, perhaps provocative, question about the possibility of a new time and a new role for art. For those in the former Eastern bloc, the present might be said to have begun in 1989 with the fall of the Berlin Wall – and in Belfast a few years later, with the signing of the Good Friday Agreement. Or perhaps it has still yet to begin? Can art invoke a genuinely new artistic-social space, or a new present in which art and the social are no longer set apart but merge again with ‘transformative’ effect? The exhibition aimed to resituate art somewhere between the discrete space of the gallery and the lived space of the community and the city. It mixed professional and non-professional art, and invited each of us to metaphorically take a chair and stake a place in the discussion.

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  • Rapture

    ET AL

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In 1931, Alice May Williams of Auckland, New Zealand began writing a series of letters to Dr Edison Pettit and Dr Seth Nicholson, astronomers at the Mt Wilson Observatory in Pasadena, California. The five surviving notes outline her knowledge of skymachines, bodies linked to souls by wireless, and give instructions for the building of devices in which people might travel between planets. They also contain glimpses of Alice’s daily life in Mt Eden, Karangahape Road and Ponsonby, where newspaper advertisements seemed to speak directly to her, post office clerks snubbed her, and landladies mocked her to her face. In these fraught circumstances, Alice May Williams began her correspondence with a pair of famous scientists who she regarded as her equals in the exploration of space: “If I die my knowledge may die with me, & no one may ever have the same knowledge again.”

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  • Paintings of the Sun

    Ingram, SA

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    For over a year Simon Ingram’s Radio Painting Station has been collecting energy emitted from hydrogen atoms undergoing “spin-flips” in space. The visual representation of this collection is a series of thirty concentrically circular compositions that materialise energy from the sun, and the interstellar medium, in a cartoon-like and painterly way. It is these that the artist chooses to present for his fourth solo exhibition Paintings of the Sun at Gow Langsford Gallery. Radio Painting Station, set up at JAR in Kingsland, is one part amateur radio astronomer's lab, one part painting studio and one part gallery space. The entrance to the space is mostly glass and at street level, with passers-by able to see the progress of the project as a series of paintings multiplies. Local people see the project as their own - parents with children in prams, bar flies en route home late at night from Kingsland bars, dog walkers; all stop to talk with the artist about what is happening in the space. The artist uses techniques and equipment of a painter turned amateur radio astronomer. Rather than looking for visible light with a telescope, he constructed a pyramid-like form and pointed it through a skylight to collect energy at the frequency of 1420 megahertz, then couples this to a special radio receiver and this to his machine. Radio Painting Station’s operation encompasses the period from the 4th of November 2013 to the 28th of April 2015. It was commissioned by Wystan Curnow and Susan Davis for JAR and supported generously by the Chartwell Trust. As well as temporarily turning JAR into an amateur radio astronomer’s painting studio, the artist installed a solar power system, electrifying it, as an off-the-grid project space.

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  • Resident

    Cousins, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    James Cousins’ new exhibition, Resident, presents a series of new works developing upon earlier thematic ideals and painterly constructs. These rich works create visually active, stimulating paintings that carry an appearance or currency of transmitted data. In a completely digital age, Cousins’ accumulated layers delay and compound acts of looking. Optically challenging layered gestures combine and play off each other effecting moments of transition between presence and absence, departure or arrival. These works hang in the present and insist on the how of painting rather than the what. Cousins' employs a range of paint applications and excavation processes that in their execution seem concurrently highly orchestrated and precise yet also spontaneous and imprecise. These processes become accumulated in the layers the works forming a kind of record of rebukes and convalescence that temper the artist decision-making. It’s through these collated narratives that these works aim to rethink ways in which gestures designate or hold subjectivity.

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