287 results for Creative work

  • The Troupe

    Harvey, Mark

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Coleccion Grafica

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Four times painting

    Ingram, SA

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Four Times Painting focused on the work of four contemporary New Zealand artists, who each critically engage with the history and practice of painting. Acknowledging painting as a medium that had come back into critical focus, the exhibition enlarged on this medium???s current situation and considered how painters engaged with its history, purpose, and material practices. Curated by Christina Barton, Four Times Painting featured the work of Simon Ingram, Julian Dashper, Isobel Thom and Shane Cotton, four artists whose works can be approached as complex and multilayered meditations on painting???s relation to time. Simon Ingram???s works critically examine a history of painting???s relation to technology. This exhibition featured his ???painting assemblages??? that used robotic technology to paint themselves and thus drew attention to the ???performance??? of painting, and his ???automata paintings,??? whose complex grid formations are built by using a methodology derived from the self-organising systems of artificial life.

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  • Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce Danced, Part 1

    Kerr, Sean

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce danced, Part 1 covers Sean Kerr???s work through the period 2010-2000. It recognises the instability of media art, looking back to recreate previous works, exploiting the juxtaposition of past and present to illustrate potential trajectories between works. Whether delivered live in the mode of performance, completed by the active role of the viewer, upgraded to evade redundant technology, or the simple practicality of reconfiguring an installation for a new site, Kerr???s work refuses to be fixed in time through the process of a conventional retrospective. Taking place simultaneously at the Gus Fisher Gallery and Artspace, this exhibition is the first survey of Kerr???s work. One of New Zealand's leading digital artists, Kerr's interests lie in the emergent area of new media technologies, incorporating internet art, installation and sonic practices, but with a particular focus on the expectations and effects of interactivity. This often includes ill-mannered scenarios and ???misbehaving??? machines that owe as much to communication theory as slapstick comedy, exploring both social and technological dynamics. Bruce danced coincides with the launch of a new book covering Kerr???s work from the early 1990s to the present day. The 160-page publication On the Nose, published by Clouds, is out in September. This exhibition and publication is supported by a National Institute of Creative Arts and Industries (NICAI) Research Development Fund.

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  • Aarero Stone - Two Solos in a Performance Landscape

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D; Scoones, R; Koronheo, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    How do we care for the strangely familiar and mourn the distant dead? The solo performance, Aarero Stone (2006) grew out of collaborative research into mythologies of stone and narratives of embodiment which express grief. European and Maori expressions of grief embodied in stone were researched through workshops in New Zealand and London. Through this research, processes of metamorphosis as embedded in mythology, geology and in digital processes were explored as a way to better understand and inhabit the changes we are experiencing in a new world order of global communications and terrorism. This enquiry followed a perceived shift in relations of meaning within art processes from metaphor to metamorphosis. Inspired by mentor, Marina Warner, I sought to explore metamorphosis as an energy and defining dynamic for change and transformation. The resulting choreography was described as 'spellbinding...an austere pageant of dance poetry...tragic, bold and clandestine.??? The Listener Dec 2007.

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  • Snow Ball Blind Time

    Robinson, Peter

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Govett-Brewster is proud to announce the release of the highly anticipated publication Peter Robinson: Snow Ball Blind Time, a beautiful and enduring companion to the landmark exhibition of the same name, commissioned by and presented at the Gallery in 2008. More than an exhibition catalogue, Snow Ball Blind Time traces Robinson???s exploration of materials and ideas through the eight major projects since his formative ACK installation at Artspace, Auckland 2006, seen as a pivotal change of direction in his artmaking practice. Govett-Brewster Director Rhana Devenport, the book publisher and commissioner of the work says, ???This new contribution to art publishing in Aotearoa registers one of the most conceptually powerful and physically arresting projects in recent times. Snow Ball Blind Time was an ephemeral art project entirely deserving of this attention.???

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  • Kei konei koe: ?? Tapuwae ki T??maki Makaurau - You Are Here: mapping Auckland

    Waghorn, Kathy; De Groot, C; Auckland War Memorial Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The exhibition Kei konei koe: ?? Tapuwae ki T??maki Makaurau You Are Here: mapping Auckland, took place in the Pictorial Gallery of the Auckland War Memorial Museum, 30 September, 2011 to 12 August, 2012. This exhibition was developed in partnership with Dr. Cris de Groot, Unitec Institute of Technology, a team of Unitec computing and product design students, and Kathy Waghorn from the School of Architecture and Planning at The University of Auckland. You Are Here explores 200 years of Auckland???s planning and evolution using 40 maps as the lens.

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  • Crystal Spirit

    Speers, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Numerology and Territories

    Speers, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    In a commercial setting, you don't need to read the sign to get it. It works in your peripheral vision. You see its colour. There are so many stories that come from a shade of blue or the depth of a red [...] I'm interested in that meditative moment, when you're looking at a magazine or a billboard and you're emptying your mind. You just download whatever image it is and you're not even really processing it. Auckland based artist Jim Speers' current exhibition Numerology and Territories continues his interest in appropriating the language and materials of local industry. His text based works carefully select the names of companies that make us aware of the semantic construction of a brand. VeilSide, for instance, is a company that specialises in customising body work for sports cars. The capitalisation of the 'V' and 'S' exists in the original brand. However by lifting these words out of their original context and simplifying the type, Speers places emphasis on the poetic combination of words and the way they function in an urban setting.

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  • Random Walk in Brussels

    Ingram, SA

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Light, Water, Pigment - an active accord

    Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Exhibition of 9 paintings for the Second International Conference on Semiconductor Photochemistry. The exhibition was based on common materials used in photochemistry and watercolour painting, water, pigment and light.

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  • Toi Te Papa: Art of the Nation

    Speers, James

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Sugarloaf is the largest non site specific light box produced in the series of light boxes made between 1998 and 2006 It was commissioned by Te Papa, the national museum and exhibited for the first time in Toi Te Papa- Art of the Nation, in 2007.

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  • Tongues of Stone : a Site Sensitive Performance

    Brown, Carol; Hannah, D

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Carol Brown - Choreography, Concept and Artistic Direction As a site-sensitive dance-architecture event, Tongues of Stone sought to transform the Central Business District of Perth, Western Australia, into a network of stories experienced through movement, sound and design, drawing attention to forgotten histories and the traumatic residue of colonialisation through performative encounters. Led from the Murray Street underground to the Swan River, the mobile audiences pathway followed an itinerary of lost wetlands and disappeared lakes covered over by urban development and infrastructure. Listening to MP4 recordings on headsets, the soundscape contained traces of three different stories adapted from writings by Ovid, Carol Anne Duffy and Audrey Fernandez-Satar. This collage of interwoven stories obliquely referenced the diverse understandings and temporalities of the city as it is re-imagined through mytho-poetic invention. A woman who has lost her tongue struggles to communicate with her newly wed sister; another reads her body like the map of a city that is both foreign and familiar; a chorus of water-carriers remember and trace tributaries of ancient wetlands; and a girl-band plays their bodies like angry instruments against the concrete facades; a long red dress becomes a tongue and the ancient Wagyl of Nyungar Dreamtime. Tongues of Stone re-imagined Perth as a place of many stories streaming through its streets, laneways and civic sites. As a work of critical engagement with the city it sought to awaken perceptions to the echoes and resonances of subterannean fluids now buried by development, to promote a sense of engagement with urban space that is enchanting and de-familiarising encouraging ecological stewardship whilst empowering the presence of women in the city to transform behaviours and promote new ways of engaging citizenship in civic life.

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  • SLIP I'm not falling I'm just hanging on for as long you'll hold me Dance Theatre Work for Touch Compass

    Brown, Carol; Scoones, R; Ransley, E

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography and Artistic Direction by Carol Brown Music and Sound Design by Russell Scoones Costumes by Emma Ransley What if the stories we carry around with us were to focus upon the contingent and the accidental? What if we acknowledge chance and slippage as our condition? The research imperative was to create a performance work that represented the individual stories of the dancers through movement and text. Using spoken and sung texts the challenge was to create an experience that communicated their inner lives in an unsentimental way. By translating their stories into song and creating a five song cycle for the work the choreography was able to move between the individual and the group opening spaces for an unsentimental appreciation of their diverse experiences whilst seeking to challenge stereotypical assumptions about disability and intellectual impairment. In the process of creating this new work we explored flying and falling and the in-between state of suspension. Driven by a desire to expose the intimacy of support, and the possibilities of surrender, we flung, krumped, collapsed and caught. The dancers wrote titles for an album of songs about life changing moments, they dressed up and down, and danced out of memories, risking everything and still moving beyond the fear of falling. Because the past is all we know of the future, they roll with their ghosts and catch their breath with the other.

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  • On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer (solo exhibition)

    Parekowhai, Michael

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The sculptural installation was exhibited at the 54th Venice Biennale in the Palazzo Loredan dell'Ambasciatore on the Grand Canal. The exhibition title is based on the poem "On First Looking into Chapman???s Homer" by the nineteenth-century English Romantic poet John Keats. In this, Keats describes a Spanish adventurer climbing to the top of a hill in what is now Panama and looking out over the Pacific to survey its potential riches for the first time. The works included one intricately-carved red Steinway concert grand piano and two concert grands fabricated in bronze supporting two cast bronze bulls. On one piano a full-size bull rested on the closed lid with its massive body suggesting the folding forms of landscape. On the other piano the bull stood firm, offering an eye-to-eye challenge for anyone prepared to take a seat at the keyboard. The installation also featured a figure from the Kapa Haka series (Officer Taumaha), two small bronze olive tree saplings (Constitution Hill), and one pair of child-sized bronze crocs. The titles of the works that make up the installation are: He Korero Purakau mo Te Awanui o Te Motu: story of a New Zealand river (the carved piano), A Peak in Darien (the resting bull and piano), and Chapman???s Homer (the standing bull and piano). He Korero Purakau mo Te Awanui o Te Motu Story of a New Zealand River was played throughout the exhibition with a programme of performances by New Zealand and Italian pianists.

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  • that's obvious! that's right! that's true!

    ET AL.

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    The collective et al. has exhibited widely both nationally and internationally to great acclaim. This exhibition continues their exploration of 'superfiction' by combining words, industrial furniture and video projections to create artworks that mirror political structures. The collective represented New Zealand at the 2005 Venice Biennale with its critically acclaimed installation the fundamental practice. Recent works have addressed fundamentalist practices and ideological schemes, and their impact on societies. The artists' approach is to use fiction and appropriation to mirror various political and belief structures. The work for Christchurch Art Gallery will continue this process of exploring aspects of super-fiction as conceptual and visual artworks.

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  • Seaunsea : An Interactive Performance

    Brown, Carol; Ramsgard-Thomsen, M; MacDonald, A; Mannion, M; Mottram, C

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Choreography and Artistic Direction - Carol Brown Architecture and Interactive Design - Mette Ramsgard Thomsen Sound Design - Alastair MacDonald Programming - Chiron Mottram Lighting Design - Michael Mannion Premiered Dance Umbrella London, SeaUnSea was an evolving interactive performance for three dancers moving in response to and affecting a virtual seascape.Core to its development was the making of an intuitive interface through which the dancers could affect and respond to the digital scenography. Using a camera interface, mounted above the stage, the dancers are seen by a swarm of intelligent agents that navigate their way through a virtual space. The agents can be understood as a swarm of digital beings that interact with each other as well as react to changes in their environment. As they seek to navigate the plane, drawn by defined points of attraction, they are hindered by shades of darkness (the dancers digital shadow). In this way ???the agents??? encounter the performers, at times evading, at times following and at other times being curious about their presence. The digital agents form vivid colour fields, assembling and dissolving creating cloud-like patterns around the performer/participant.Other artists exploring particle streams to extend the trace-form of the dancer include Trisha Brown, however this research as developed in SeaUnSea is original in its extension of this technology through the layering of a mesh architecture which embeds the time-based trace of the dancers??? presence.

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  • Rare Form

    Pritchard, E; Mullins, K; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curators, artist Rare Form brings together a group of artists who work in sculpture, paint, print and assemblage, all of whom pull apart the method and order of art-making. Some works are comprised of many parts while others record a series of actions, and the means of generation or construction is often evident in the finished works. The object, the illusion, the form and the frame are subverted, giving the works a sense of playful intoxication; both the artists and their creations are in rare form.

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  • THE IMAGE AS NOT a celebration of ambiguity and negation

    Baatz, U; Crone, D; Donnelly, M; Dowling, J; Gregory, Nuala; Heron, W; Hill, T; Hooghiemstra, T; Schneider, J

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    Curator ???THE IMAGE AS NOT???, is a show dedicated to a celebration of ambiguity and negation, and features the following artists: Uta Baatz, David Crone, Mickey Donnelly, John Dowling, Nuala Gregory, Willie Heron, Tony Hill, Tjibbe Hooghiemstra, Jurgen Schneider.

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  • Dinnseanchas - From New Delhi to the Fountain of the Clouded Sky

    Gregory, NA; Gregory, Nuala

    Creative work
    The University of Auckland Library

    This three-person exhibition was curated by Nuala Gregory (and included her own collages that were collaborations with artists Sarah Treadwell, John Pusateri and Mandy Bonnell). The other two invited artists were Diane Henshaw and Deirdre Mackel. The exhibition consisted of a series of artworks of varying scale, in mixed media on paper, including lithography, gouache paintings, charcoal drawings, and all with elements of collage. The works were arranged to form a themed installation featuring new bodies of work produced in response to the theme of dinnseanchas or ???poetry of place???. Drawing upon their experiences of very different environments (Auckland, Mayo, Belfast), the artists sought to define a set of relations to place that goes beyond the familiar and the functional. Instead, they attempted to recover a poetic or imagistic way of navigating public and private space, in a co-creation of the lived environment that has roots deep in ancient Irish culture. A modern Irish-English dictionary translates the word dinnseanchas as ???topography??? (the science of place), but its etymology is quite revealing. The term originally referred to an ancient genre of mythological geography that gave a poetic account of place names. Dinn means place (an eminent site or locale); sean means old, and is strongly associated with the figure of the seancha?? or local storyteller, the keeper of lore and memory; and cas means to twist, as in the twisting of an ankle, but also of a rope. Poetically, the word suggests the twisting together of strands of collective memory of place. Perhaps forming a single narrative core, or (in a more visual idiom) a tapestry weaving together place and people, memory and experience, history and present desire. This tradition, this mnemonic and cognitive practice, was gradually extinguished in Ireland along with the native language, but has been ???reclaimed??? in recent years particularly by the work of poets such as Seamus Heaney, Paul Muldoon and Ciaran Carson. In this exhibition, the artists have expressed the spirit of dinnseanchas in a modern idiom, as a ???cognitive-imaginative mapping??? of the environment through forms of artistic engagement. Not so much by naming or storytelling, or acts of linguistic commemoration, but by marking and investing, revealing or creating new ways of seeing the landscape or cityscape ??? ways that can help overcome our habitual blindness, born of the pressures of time and work and commercial imperatives.

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