275 results for Creative work

  • 3-D knit transformations

    Smith, AE; Kalyanji, J; Fraser, G (2014-05-07)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Rapid advances in seamless knitting technology are opening up significant opportunities in the design, production and application of knitted textile preforms. Introduced in the mid 1990’s, seamless machinery enables shaped, 3-dimensional knitted forms to be produced entirely by machine. While garment producers globally adopted the technology for its economic efficiencies, the standardised templates in the technology’s software have generally reduced the sophistication of designs produced. Although the signifi cant unrealised potential in seamless technology is widely acknowledged, designers and manufacturers are facing diffi culties in understanding and integrating the complex technology into their practice. There remains a fundamental gap in knowledge and skills, in part due to a simplified and modular garment based user interface, which fronts a complex and sophisticated technology. Of the limited research in this area, most relates to garment shaping. More recently, we have started to see sophisticated applications of this technology in highly technical or artisanal design outcomes emerging from textile research centres. The design and production of knitted textile forms in 3-dimensions, as opposed to the 2-dimensional fl at pattern and construction of the past, is a significant conceptual shift for traditional textile design practice. Traditional craft and design practices are often disrupted by the emergence of new technologies. We believe that the disruption created by seamless knit technology has the potential to vastly change both the design and application of knitted textiles, moving knitted textile manufacturing up the value chain. This installation showcases the advanced capabilities of seamless knitting technology for innovative, 3-dimensional form building and high-end design outcomes. The group submitting this proposal consists of a knitwear designer, knitted textile designer and knit technician. All are experienced in this field, and will draw on current research and developments to work collaboratively in producing a collection of seamless knitted products that demonstrate unique shaping, 3-dimensionality, pattern and texture. The collection includes both garment and non-garment applications and may incorporate smart textile applications.

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  • Tira Taonga

    Puke, KA; Foster, ST

    Creative work
    Massey University

    Tira: n. travelling party, company of travellers, choir, ray, beam (Moorfeild, 2011). A collaboration with Stuart Foster (College of Creative Arts, MU) for the group exhibition reflex, figment as part of the Triggering Memory Symposium for Memory Waka Massey University NZ and Seracuse University USA. September 2015 marks the 31st year since the spectacular dawn opening of ‘Te Maori’ at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1984. ‘Te Maori’ presented in New York and three other central American museums, set down a profound legacy and ongoing impacts for all New Zealanders in the international art and heritage arenas. From the Taranaki region, one of the exhibiting taonga was a tauihu; a war canoe prow carved within the Te Huringa 1 stylistic classification period. In 1986 ‘Te Maori’ then returned with the exhibition renamed ‘Te Hokinga Mai’, a ‘home’ tour to four New Zealand centres, that allowed the significance of the event to be reflected upon within a national and iwi context. The taonga were then settled back to their respective resting places, mainly in public museum collections with continued visual commemoration occurring through printed publications. The unique aspect of these exhibitions were the tira or travelling party of elders and younger iwi members who accompanied the exhibition: to keep the taonga ‘warm’ and uphold ‘mana’ of the taonga, their interconnecting people and lands. A contingent of Taranaki elders joined this first exhibition to New York. For Māori taonga remain valued for their intangible, as much, as their tangible, qualities. This significance is expressed through performative incantation that reflects an understanding of an ultimate reality of all things: as energy, with ‘mauri’ manifest in this physical realm: Te ao marama, often through reference to the notions of light waves and frequencies. ‘Tira Taonga’ marks the commencement of the retracing and return visit to New York in 2016, where ‘real-time’ ceremonial vocalisations will illuminate and drive light qualities across surface. Through 3D scanning and visualization processes, light points are captured as pixels and constituted in form as the tauihu. For Reflex, figment a process of consent and ceremonial inclusion has allowed the investigation of 3D imaging techniques and sound carrying light with this taonga, for this first step toward the tauihu visualisation. ‘Tira Taonga’ signifies the beginning of a visual-aural journey; toward rejuvenating the memory of our elders, acknowledging the ongoing life cycle of the taonga, and illuminating the pathway for the tira accompanying this virtual tauihu; our living descendants. He oranga te taonga he oranga te tangata (Te Huirangi Waikerepuru)

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  • Trigger Points (exhibition co-curator)

    Galbraith, HL; Saluti, AJ

    Creative work
    Massey University

    Trigger Points draws together contemporary and historical works from New Zealand, the United States, Australia, Finland and the United Kingdom to explore the potent and slippery nature of memory. It examines the way memories are triggered by sensory stimuli, haptic encounters and visceral prompts, and how episodes, actions or encounters are felt physically and emotionally as well as understood rationally.

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  • Knitting patterns

    Clark, SJ

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Leadership and struggling students

    Dalziel, Paul C.

    Creative work
    Lincoln University

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  • Emerald Muriwai - Maori culture and wellbeing

    Muriwai, E

    Creative work
    Massey University

    Emerald Muriwai, Masters student from the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study talks about her research assessing the buffering or protective function of cultural efficacy for Maori. This research was published in the New Zealand Journal of Psychology.

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  • A diagram (Geology)(2011)

    Cullen, P (2012-04-10)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    A Diagram was an outdoor site-based sculptural work comprising a tower, a deck structure, a vertical ladder and support structure, benches and a field of rocks. The installation of spatially dispersed objects configured a site through which viewers could walk.

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  • Ultralocal: design proposals for the Kaipatiki project environment centre

    Austin, A; Cooper, F; Kane, D; Kumar, A; Lin, S; Sun, YK; Thorp, S; Anderson, S; Crawcour, H; Gruiters, M; Janpiam, W; Lee, C; Pan, E; Song, A (2011-10-18)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    ULTRALOCAL is a collaboration which brings together architectural design works from seven postgraduate students at the University of Auckland School of Architecture and Planning, and spatial design works from seven undergraduate students at the AUT University Department of Spatial Design. The work shares the common focus of projecting visions for a new Environment Centre for the Kaipatiki Project, a non-profit community group based on Auckland's North Shore. The Kaipatiki Project currently focuses on environmental education and bush restoration services, and has initiated the design of an Environment Centre to advance its wider vision of 'inspiring communities to live sustainably'.

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  • Canopy: proposal for Wynyard wharf. Auckland architecture week 09 invited design charette

    Young, E; Douglas, C; Richards, H; Xu, C; Fisher, CPRW (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    As part of Auckland Architecture Week 09, a one-day invited design charette was held in a public venue in the Britomart Quarter. The charette was intended to show people what architects do, and to generate concepts for the Auckland City Council's intended redevelopment of the Wynyard Quarter. Teams were briefed at 8:30am, with the final presentation at 5:30pm. The brief called for open public space, retail, community facilities, offices, apartments, and a 'Big Idea' to activate the site. We proposed a non-destructive evolution of the existing fabric, beginning with some 'quick-and-dirty' temporary interventions to begin building community on the site. A layered canopy would be progressively built over the site for monolithic programmatic elements, with ground-level development maintaining a smaller urban grain to keep the existing working character of the site.

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  • Dynamic geometries. Te Wero bridge as a pacific monument

    Young, E; Davis, M; Douglas, C; Ceelen, V; Stevens, B; Phuong, DK; Jones, W; Fordham, F; Xu, C; Chou, W; Neville, H (2011-10-20)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Te Wero bridge re-interprets traditional notions of monumentality by projecting itself as a dynamic point of exchange. The bridge is a new kind of icon for Auckland. Positioned to articulate a subtle adjustment on the Quay St / Jellicoe St axis, it plays its part in a series of urban callings. It offers the challenge of arrival and departure, and sets up a continual dialogue between the city and Wynyard Quarter. Gently wavering masts respond to environmental shifts. On opening, the structure becomes taut, and the roadway rises to scribe an anthropomorphic arc. On closing, the bridge lowers itself back into place, gesturing a precise offering, and providing the necessary tolerance. The event is a study of poise and elegance. The bridge is structurally efficient, with its tensegrity tower, geometrically folded decks, and a gravity and spring-assisted cable and winch system. Te Wero bridge acts as a symbol of the First City of the Pacific not only by its physical presence, but through its articulation of what it means to be Pacific.

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  • Headland sculpture on the gulf: a diagram headland 2011

    Cullen, P (2011-11-03)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    A coastal site with southerly aspect, overlooking Motukaha Island and Sergeant Channel. On the raised edge of a steep cliff. Views of the harbour and island. Geology: argillite, indurated marine mudstone: dark grey-green, well-sorted, well-cemented. A tower, ladder, platform, and benches. Auckland-based Paul Cullen is a senior lecturer in Visual Arts at the Auckland University of Technology. He studied at both the University of Auckland and the University of Canterbury, achieving honours in sculpture. He has a Diploma of Fine Arts, Canterbury, First Class; Master of Fine Arts, Auckland; and a Doctorate of Fine Arts, Auckland. His recent international projects include The Halifax Project (2009), Port Loggia Gallery, NSCAD University, Nova Scotia Canada. New Zealand projects include Garden (2009-2010) at Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa; Wellington, Table (2009-2010) at the Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato, Revolutions per Minute (2010) at the Jane Sanders Gallery Auckland and Motel (2010-2011) at Te Tuhi Gallery Auckland. Cullen exhibited Weather Stations at headland SCULPTURE ON THE GULF 2009.

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  • ICT innovations in teaching in food biochemistry laboratories

    Vanhanen, Leo P.; Savage, Geoffrey P.; Clemes, S.

    Creative work
    Lincoln University

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  • Stewarts Gully

    Dyer, Jacqueline

    Creative work
    Lincoln University

    Major design project for Diploma in Landscape Architecture

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  • Pool Complex, in making worlds

    Cullen, P (2012-04-12)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Pool complex was made in 1994-1995 and was never exhibited before going into the collection of the Auckland Art Gallery. In common with many works I've made since the early 1990's it employed found furniture and dexion.

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  • Ultra Neon

    Thomson, A; Heng, E; Pahoki, S; Robinson, K; Macdonald, F; Haylock, B (2012-04-15)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Light Projects presents a mini-survey of neon works. Text-based or abstract, wall-based or sculptural, Ultra Neon assembles neon works from a variety of practices into a densely hung dialogue. This is a single artwork exhibited in a group show curated by Light Projects (Lesley Eastman and Tamsin Green). The artwork took the form of a long pink neon tube that represents the vertical meridian of the Light Project's gallery space, displayed in conjunction with other neon light works exhibited by the other participating artists including Euan Heng,Brad Haylock, Fiona MacDonald, Sanja Pahoki,Kiron Robinson and Andy Thomson.

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  • Pool Complex, in Making Worlds.

    Cullen, P (2012-04-12)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Pool complex was made in 1994-1995 and was never exhibited before going into the collection of the Auckland Art Gallery. In common with many works I've made since the early 1990's it employed found furniture and dexion.

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  • Eunoia S,M,L,XL: Modular light timber framed structural systems

    Young, E; Richards, E; Boardman, P (2012-05-28)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    Eunoia S,M,L,XL - Commissioned Practice based research project into modular light timber framed structural systems and their application to a range of five bach designs for the New Zealand market. Commissioned by Eunoia Holdings Limited to create an optimized modular light timber framed construction system. Developed to allow for efficient construction on remote building sites and minimize wastage as well as factory modular.

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  • Pier 21 (interior design proposal)

    Young, E (2012-05-28)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract

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  • The Palms (commercial architecture proposal)

    Young, E (2012-05-28)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract

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  • Dominion Road: the shifting urbanscape

    Ho, KT (2011-12-01)

    Creative work
    Auckland University of Technology

    The Dominion Road project is a photographic project proposed and developed by King Tong HO, the Chairman of Photowhisper Incorporated. Its intention is to explore the ongoing cultural activities on Dominion Road and, in time, to develop a photo-based archive to represent the creative works of New Zealand Chinese photographers, and to support the historical and cultural studies of the local communities.

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