3 results for Dataset, 2007

  • Theology in Aotearoa New Zealand: Endnote library

    Darragh, Neil (2007)

    Dataset
    The University of Auckland Library

    The criteria for inclusion in this bibliography are: 1) That an item be written. This bibliography thus does not include references to conversations, liturgies, audio- or video-tapes, dance, painting, sculpture, architecture, or carving even though a great deal of theological expression in Aotearoa New Zealand occurs in these forms. 2) That the work be one of Christian theology. This criterion should be thought of as a tendency along a continuum rather than a clear dividing line. Works included thus tend towards being a) explicit (or critical or formal) reflections with some degree of self-criticism on beliefs and values, including God, ethics, community, environment, etc. b) in the light of the Christian Scriptures or subsequent Church traditions, and c) are intended in some manner to be persuasive with an element of self-criticism rather than simply descriptive. To put the matter conversely, writings are less likely to be included to the extent that their theological content tends to be a) implicit (as is often the case in novels, short stories, history, and social commentary), and b) if they have no Christian reference (as in the case of reflections from other religious reference points or without explicit religious foundation at all), and c) if they are intended to be merely expressions of personal opinion without any sense of being proposals that invite other people’s adherence (as is often the case in autobiographies and personal comments on religious subjects in magazines and newspapers). 3) That the work be contextual to Aotearoa New Zealand. The term "contextual" is used here in the sense of "local". For inclusion in this bibliography contextual writings are those that make some degree of both substantial reference (more then simply examples and illustrations) and explicit reference (clearly stated local analysis and application) to Aotearoa New Zealand. This bibliography does not normally include historical writing. Religious history in New Zealand is already well served by Allan Davidson’s New Zealand Religious History Newsletter (http://hdl.handle.net/2292/1961) and Peter Lineham’s New Zealand Religious History Bibliography (http://www.massey.ac.nz/~plineham/RelhistNZ.htm). The author of this bibliography would welcome any additions or corrections within the above criteria, at n.darragh@auckland.ac.nz This document contains a bibliography in “Endnote” library format. It includes reference information and abstracts for theological writings contextual to Aotearoa New Zealand. It is offered as a resource for students of local theologies. This “Endnote” library is intended as a companion document to two “Word” documents also accessible on Researchspace at the University of Auckland (http://www.researchspace.auckland.ac.nz). One of these is an annotated bibliography categorised under subject headings entitled Theology in Aotearoa New Zealand: an annotated bibliography under subject headings (http://hdl.handle.net/2292/447).

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  • Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC2007)

    Pennebaker, JW; Booth, Roger; Francis, ME (2007)

    Dataset
    The University of Auckland Library

    Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) is a text analysis software program designed by James W. Pennebaker, Roger J. Booth, and Martha E. Francis. LIWC calculates the degree to which people use different categories of words across a wide array of texts, including emails, speeches, poems, or transcribed daily speech. With a click of a button, you can determine the degree any text uses positive or negative emotions, self-references, causal words, and 70 other language dimensions.

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  • PeerWise

    Denny, Paul (2007)

    Dataset
    The University of Auckland Library

    PeerWise is web-based learning tool that leverages the familiarity students have with social software and Web 2.0, engaging them directly in the assessment process. Using PeerWise, students work collaboratively with their peers to construct, share, evaluate, answer and discuss a repository of assessment questions relevant to their course. Students are responsible for creating and moderating the resource, typically generating many hundreds of questions and submitting many thousands of answers. Since its first use at the University of Auckland in 2007, more than 200,000 questions and 5 million answers have been contributed by students from over 200 institutions around the world.

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