15,403 results for Journal article, ResearchSpace@Auckland

  • Assessing the dimensionality of computer self-efficacy among pre-service teachers in Singapore: A structural equation modeling approach

    Teo, Timothy; Koh, JHL (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study examines the computer self-efficacy among pre-service teachers (N=708) at a teacher training institute in Singapore. Data were collected through self-reported ratings on a 7-point Likert-type scale. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was performed on an initial sample (N=354) and the result revealed that pre-service teachers' computer self-efficacy was explained by three factors: Basic Computer Skills (BCS), Media-Related Skills (MRS), and Web-Based Skills (WBS). Using a separate sample (N=354), a confirmatory factor analysis was performed and this supported the three-factor structure from the initial EFA. A comparison of alternative models revealed that the correlated three-factor and second-order (three -factor) models had the best fits; and were adequate representations of pre-service teachers' computer self-efficacy. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

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  • Explaining the intention to use technology among volitional users in education: An evaluation of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) using structural equation modeling

    Teo, Timothy (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study investigated a sample (N=157) of pre-service teachers' intention to use technology, using the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) as a research framework. In this study, pre-service teachers were used to represent volitional users of technology. This study contributes to the growing studies on TAM by demonstrating that perceived usefulness (PU), perceived ease of use (PEU) and attitude toward computer use (ATCU) to be significant determinants of the intention to use (ITU). Using the structural equation modelling approach, there was a good model fit for both the measurement and structural models. All four hypotheses were supported. Overall, the results of this study offer some evidence that the TAM is an effective model to explain pre-service teachers' intention to use technology.

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  • Evaluating the intention to use technology among trainee teachers using the Technology Acceptance Model: A structural equation modeling approach

    Teo, Timothy (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study examined student teachers' self-reported intentions to use technology. One hundred and fifty-nine participants completed a survey questionnaire measuring their responses to four constructs derived from the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). Using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM), a path analysis was conducted to analyze the data. The results of this study showed that the TAM is a valid model in explaining student teachers' intention to use technology. Overall, this study indicated that attitude towards computer use had the largest effect on the intention to use technology, followed by perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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  • The influence of user characteristics on technology acceptance by teachers: A literature review

    Teo, Timothy (2006)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Advances in computer technology and the diffusion of personal computers, coupled with the associated hardware, software, and network resources, motivated the development and implementation of new and innovative teaching strategies. Today it is accepted that technology plays an important and integral role in the teaching and learning process to effectively prepare students to face multiple challenges in the 21st century workplace. Within this framework, the role of the teacher is an important one as most of the students' activities in the schools are managed by the teacher. Thus it is essential to understand the factors that influence teachers' acceptance of technology for use in the classroom. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR]

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  • Assessing the cross-cultural validity study of the E-learning Acceptance Measure (ElAM): A structural equation modeling approach

    Teo, Timothy (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study is a cross-cultural validation of the E-learning Acceptance Measure (ElAM) (Teo, 2010). E-learning acceptance was defined as the extent to which users would use elearning for the purposes it was designed for. A sample of 377 university students from three public universities in Thailand participated in this study. Using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, the results revealed that the original 3-factor ElAM was not supported. However, the data in this study supported a correlated two-factor model (Tutor Quality and Facilitating Conditions) although an acceptable model fit to the data was not found. Despite significant parameter estimates for all 21 items, there were a high number of correlated measurement errors among these items, suggesting the possibility of unexplained shared variances among the items and unmodeled factors. This study concludes with suggestions for further cross-cultural validation studies

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  • Influence of user characteristics on teachers’ intention to use technology: Some research evidence

    Teo, Timothy (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Advances in computer technology and the diffusion of personal computers, coupled with the associated hardware and software, and network resources, motivated the development and implementation of new and innovative teaching strategies. Today, it is accepted that technology plays an important and integral role in the instructional process in order to effectively prepare students to face multiple challenges in the 21st century workplace. Within this framework, the role of the teacher is an important one as most of the students' activities in the schools are managed by the teacher. These include how and when technology is used by the teacher and students. Given the high stakes, it is essential to understand the factors that drive teachers' intention to use technology for teaching and learning.

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  • An integrated framework for designing Computer Learning Environments (CLEs)

    Wang, YQ; Teo, Timothy; Woo, HL (2009)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Web-based constructivist learning environments (CLEs) have many merits over the traditional classroom setting. However, few practice guidelines are currently available to guide the design of an effective web-based CLE. This article presents a three-layer integrated framework, which includes foundational tenets of constructivism and information and communication technology (ICT) at the central layer, element design and interaction design at the middle layer, and product specifications at the outermost layer. This framework illustrates clearly how detailed specifications of a CLE are eventually developed based on the basic beliefs of constructivism, by following the design guidelines suggested by element design and interaction design.

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  • The role of self-questioning: Problem solving in a security organisation

    Ng, KH; Lee, CB; Teo, T (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Self-questioning plays an important role in problem solving. In this study, we examined the effects of self-questioning techniques on problem solving and metacognition for ill-structured workplace problems including counter-terrorism, which is unconventional. The independent variable was the strategy training in self-questioning techniques, structuring around the IDEAL model as a cognitive heuristics adaptation to resolve novel situations. The dependent variable metacognition was made up of two constructs i.e. knowledge about cognition and regulation of cognition. These were measured by using the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI) while overall problem solving performance was determined by assessing the participants' reasoning and the resulting consequences of their decision (outcome performance) in the pre- and post-tests. Our results revealed that the intervention had significant positive effects on the novices' reasoning performance, outcome performance and overall problem solving performance. In addition, the level of correlation between reasoning performance and outcome performance was significantly positive.

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  • Using structural equation modeling (SEM) in educational research: Practices and Issues

    Teo, Timothy (2011)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Structural equation modeling (SEM) is a method for analyzing multivariate data from both nonexperimental and experimental research. This method combines a measurement model linking observed variables with latent variables and a structural model linking latent variables. The use of SEM in social science and educational research has grown since the early days in 1980s and offers promise as a method that is useful in theory-based research. Using a data set for analysis, this paper presents a step-by-step, non-technical introduction on how the SEM technique is used. Throughout the paper, practical suggestions are given in order that researchers could use the SEM technique quickly. The paper concludes with information on relevant internet resources for further study and research. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]

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  • Invasive meningococcal disease in Northland, New Zealand

    Mills, Clair (2011-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Invasive meningococcal disease is a serious illness commonly presenting as a meningitis and/or septicaemia. The case fatality rate in New Zealand over the last decade has varied from 4 to 10%, with higher rates for group C disease.

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  • I/O Psychology programmes at New Zealand universities: Contributions to the profession and to organizations in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    O'Driscoll, M; Burt, C; Cable, D; Cooper Thomas, Helena; Gardner, D; Lobb, B (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • New Zealand's HIV infected population under active follow-up during 2000

    Mills, G.; Yardley, A.M.; Thomas, M.; Blackmore, T.; Pithie, A.; Schroeder, B.; Dickson, N. (2002)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Aim. To audit New Zealand's HIV infected population currently under active follow-up. Methods. Multiple sources were used to determine anonymously the demographic and management characteristics of HIV infected individuals being monitored with HIV viral load measurements and/or receiving antiretroviral therapy during 2000. Results. 593 people (480 males and 113 females) were under active follow-up. The most common transmission risk was male homosexual contact (56%) followed by heterosexual contact (28%), injecting drug use (3%) and mother to infant transmission (1%). Ethnicity data showed a disproportionate number of Africans (13%) compared to recent census figures. Anti-retroviral therapy was used in 71% of the cohort of whom 62% had HIV viral load measurements below 400 copies/mL. An upper estimate of diagnosed HIV individuals living in New Zealand at 30/9/2000 was 801. Conclusions. This is the first time that the demographic and clinical state of HIV infected individuals has been assessed throughout New Zealand. The results suggests a slightly lower number of HIV infected individuals currently living in New Zealand than previously estimated. Anti-retroviral therapy is being used effectively within the HIV infected population. The changing demographics, with a higher proportion of people under care from Africa, increasing numbers of females, and an increase in the proportion with heterosexual risk factors are particular challenges.

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  • Depression in patients in an Auckland general practice

    Goodyear-Smith, F.; Lloyd, T.; Arroll, B. (2002)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Aim. To measure the rate of detected and undetected depression in patients attending an Auckland generalpractice. Method. At their consultation conclusion, general practitioners (GPs) asked all consecutive patients oversixteen years attending for consultation to participate in ahealth and mood questionnaire. A researcher administeredthe Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) to consentingparticipants. The GPs previously recorded whether theyconsidered these patients depressed. Results. Response rate among patients was 81% (253/314). The BDI found a 13.8% (35/253) 95% CI (9.6-18.5)depression prevalence among patients. GPs picked up 51%of cases (sensitivity 0.51 and specificity 0.91). Mäoripatients were no more likely to be depressed than non-Mäori but they were less likely to be receiving or havereceived treatment with antidepressants. Conclusion. The rate of depression in this practice was higher than an earlier study suggesting the true rate may be>10%. GPs see more depressed patients than other healthprofessionals, therefore improvement in detection andmanagement of depression in primary care is important.More work is needed on the difference between Mäori andnon-Mäori in the use of antidepressants

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  • Ethnic and gender differences in the use of coronary artery revascularisation procedures in New Zealand

    Bindman, A.B.; Tukuitonga, C.F. (2002)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Aims. To examine ethnic and gender variations in the use of coronary artery revascularisation procedures in New Zealand and to determine whether the introduction of priority scores affected intervention trends. Methods. Analysis of the National Minimum Database for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) intervention rates for New Zealand Pacific, Maori, and other men and women aged 40 years and over during the decade 1990-1999. Results. Coronary artery revascularisation rates were lower in women than in men in all ethnic groups and in Pacific and Maori men compared with other New Zealand men. Compared to all men, the mean age-standardised CABG and PTCA intervention rate ratios in all women were 0.34 and 0.36. Compared to other New Zealand men, the mean age-standardised CABG and PTCA intervention rate ratios were 0.64 and 0.25 in Pacific and 0.40 and 0.29 in Maori men respectively. Compared to other New Zealand women, the rate ratios for CABG and PTCA were 0.73 and 0.21 in Pacific and 0.74 and 0.43 in Maori women respectively. Introducing priority scores was neither associated with reduced cardiac procedures nor significantly reduced variation in procedures across all ethnic groups. Conclusions. Although Pacific and Maori peoples had higher rates of coronary artery disease morbidity and mortality, revascularisation rates were lower in both groups. Strategies beyond the use of priority scores are needed to address ethnic and gender disparities on coronary artery revascularisation procedures in New Zealand.

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  • Positional upper airways narrowing and an apparent life threatening event

    Vogel, S.; Bennet, L.; Gunn, A.J.; Tonkin, S.L. (2002)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. The present case confirms that flexion of the infant's head onto it's own chest can produce severe airway narrowing. It is highly likely that this narrowing was responsible for the alarming cyanosis in this infant. The underlying factor allowing such airway narrowing is the immaturity of the tempero-axillary joint in newborns, which allows much more antero-posterior movement than in adults.

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  • Cardiovascular disease and lipid management in New Zealand: Progress at last!

    Scott, R.; Ellis, C.J. (2002)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Is summary, we are now experiencing a paradigm shift in our understanding of the role of lipid management and cardiovascular disease. There are currently approximately 120 000 New Zealanders receiving lipid-modifying agents. A figure closer to 400 000 within five years would vastly improve patient outcomes for cardiovascular disease, the commonest cause of death and major morbidity in New Zealand. The impending changes to access if coupled with utilisation of the soon to be available guidelines will allow most high-risk patients to be more effectively treated. All doctors have a responsibility to use this clinical resource efficiently and wisely.

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  • Auckland paediatric liver transplant experience 1990-2000

    Wesley, A; Chin, S; Harding, J; Smith, J (2002)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Aims. New Zealand is establishing its own Paediatric Liver Transplant Service. However there have been no readily available data on the experience of New Zealand paediatric transplant recipients to date. The aim of our study was to determine numbers and indications for transplant at present, current outcomes and to estimate the likely demand for the service in the future.

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  • Geographically separate outbreaks of shigellosis in Auckland, New Zealand linked by molecular subtyping to cases returning from Samoa

    Hicking, J.; Bennett, J.M.; Mohammed, A.; Stewart, J.M.; Simmons, G.; Hill, P.C. (2002)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Aims To investigate simultaneous outbreaks of Shigella sonnei gastroenteritis occurring in February 2001 at a health camp for socially deprived children and an elderly care facility. Methods Those with symptoms were interviewed using standardised questionnaire. Cases were defined as having least three loose stools over a 24 hour period and stool samples requested. A case-control study investigating routes of transmission was performed at the health camp. Environmental investigations of food safety and hygiene were conducted at each facility.

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  • Leg ulcers in New Zealand: Age at onset, recurrence and provision of care in an urban population

    Rodgers, A.; Birchall, N.; Norton, R.; MacMahon, S.; Walker, N. (2002)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. Aim. To describe the age at onset, recurrence rate, and provision of care for people with leg ulcers in New Zealand. Methods. Between 1997 and 1998, people with current leg ulcers were identified from the North Auckland and Central Auckland health districts via notification from relevant health professionals and by self-referral. All ulcer types were investigated. Identified cases, aged between 40 and 99 years and on the general electoral roll, were interviewed as part of a case-control study. Descriptive information relating to interviewed cases is presented. Results. 241 people with leg ulcers were interviewed. The average age was 75 years and almost 60% were women. The average age at ulcer onset was 65 years, 59% of people had recurrent ulcers, and 24% had been hospitalised in the last five years because of their leg ulcers. Those people with recurrent leg ulcers had lived with their condition for an average of fifteen years, with an average time to healing for their last ulcer of thirteen months. Treatment of this condition was largely community-based, with 136 different treatment options employed. Conclusions. Leg ulceration remains a chronic and recurring condition, with substantial practice variation in terms of treatment. Urgent attention needs to be given to the management of leg ulcer patients in this country, particularly given that New Zealand has a rapidly ageing population.

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  • Challenges for District Health Boards as needs assessors

    Buetow, S.; Coster, G. (2002)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    An open access copy of this article is available and complies with the copyright holder/publisher conditions. DHBs face the foregoing challenges in the current and future environment, as they take on democratic representation for the population, particularly in health needs assessment, consultation, prioritisation and health service purchasing. Need and objectives must be clearly defined at an early stage in the context of resource constraints and timeframes that will challenge the ability of Boards to conduct needs assessments. Consultation with the community and other, expert groups must inform needs assessments. But it is not clear how the prioritisation process will work, particularly regarding the ability of local agendas for purchasing of health services that complement the national agenda. Recent health crises have shown that DHBs, without Government support, cannot easily meet such challenges in the new decentralised environment. Consideration must therefore be given to how these identified challenges for DHBs as needs assessors can best be met.

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