1,302 results for Journal article, 2007

  • NMR-Solution structures of fluoro-substituted β-peptides: A 3 14-helix and a hairpin turn. The first case of a 90 [degrees] O=C-C-F dihedral angle in an α-fluoro-amide group

    Mathad, R. I.; Jaun, B.; Flögel, O.; Gardiner, J.; Löwenenck, M.; Codee, J. D.C.; Edmonds, M. K. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    To further study the preference of the antiperiplanar (ap) conformation in a-fluoro-amide groups two b-peptides (1, 2), containing a (2-F)-b3hAla and a (2-F)-b2hPhe residue, have been synthesized. Their NMR-solution structures in CD3OH were determined and compared with those of non-fluorosubstituted analogs (3, 4a). While we have found in a previous investigation (Helv. Chim. Acta 2005, 88, 266) that a stereospecifically introduced F-substituent in the central position of a b-heptapeptide is capable of “breaking” the 314-helical structure by enforcing the F–C–C=O ap-conformation, we could now demonstrate that this same procedure leads to a structure with the unfavorable ca. 90º F–C–C=O dihedral angle, enforced by the 314-helical folding in a b-tridecapeptide (1, Fig. 4). This is interpreted as a consequence of cooperative folding in the longer b-peptide. An F-substituent placed in the turn section of a b-peptidic hairpin turn was shown to be in an ap-arrangement with respect to the neighboring C=O bond (2, Fig. 7). Analysis of the non-fluorosubstituted b-tetrapeptides (with helix-preventing configurations of the two central b2/b3-amino acid residues) provides unusually tight hairpin structural clusters (3, 4a, Fig. 8, 9). The skeleton of the b-tetrapeptide H-(R)b3hVal-(R)b2hVal-(R)b3hAla-(S)b3hPhe-OH (4a) is proposed as a novel, very simple back-bone structure for mimicking a-peptidic hairpin turns.

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  • Risky work: Child protection practice

    Stanley, T. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The introduction of a differential response model to the New Zealand child protection system is an important social policy initiative. However, the differential response literature has yet to address the role that risk discourses play as organising and regulatory regimes in contemporary child protection work, and this paper addresses this gap. Child protection social work is strongly underpinned by discourses of risk, and this is best illustrated in the adoption of risk assessment tools that aim to assist the practices of risk assessment and its management. This paper traces the shifting and discursive functions of risk in child protection social work, and argues that Child, Youth and Family (CYF)2 social workers are negotiating a complex and increasingly pressured practice environment where difficult decisions can be legitimised through the use of risk discourses. The author’s doctoral study, which considered risk discourses and statutory social work practice decisions, is drawn on to illustrate how social workers may inadvertently compromise the differential response system – a system where the discursive functions of risk are likely to remain central and regulatory. There is a danger that CYF social workers might construct their role within such a system as increasingly the assessor and manager of high risk. This paper advocates for social work training and supervision as forums where practitioners can consider and better understand these risk discourses.

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  • Not accepting oblivion - The career of Cedric Savage

    Pauli, D. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article is the result of my continuing engagement with biography as a mode of framing art historical research. It proved challenging to write because during the later stages of his career, Savage frequently moved between Europe and New Zealand and had to negotiate on-going economic and political changes, both at home and abroad. Moreover, his career coincided with the rise of modernism, and the subsequent split of the already distinctly regionalised New Zealand art world into pro- and anti-modernist factions. Not least because of his working class background, complex personality and ambiguous sexual orientation, this proved to be a difficult context for Savage to negotiate. His letters are often frank, and discuss in some detail the realities of trying to make a living as an artist in New Zealand. Writing his biography therefore allowed me to develop a more nuanced perspective of the life of a professional painter in 20th century New Zealand painting, beyond the more commonly applied modernist paradigm.

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  • Development of the New Zealand nursing workforce: historical themes and current challenges

    Gage, J.D.; Hornblow, A.R. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Development of the New Zealand nursing workforce has been shaped by social, political, scientific and inter-professional forces. The unregulated, independent and often untrained nurses of the early colonial period were succeeded in the early 1900s by registered nurses, with hospital based training, working in a subordinate role to medical practitioners. In the mid/late 1900s, greater specialization within an expanding workforce, restructuring of nursing education, health sector reform, and changing social and political expectations again reshaped nursing practice. Nursing now has areas of increasing autonomy, expanding opportunities for postgraduate education and leadership roles, and a relationship with medicine which is more collaborative than in the past. Three current challenges are identified for nursing in New Zealand‟s rapidly evolving health sector; development of a nursing focused knowledge culture, strengthening of research capacity, and dissemination of new nursing knowledge.

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  • Carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 enrichment in coastal forest foliage from nutrient-poor and seabird-enriched sites in southern New Zealand

    Hawke, D. J.; Newman, J. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    To assess the effect of nutrient inputs from breeding seabirds on forest foliage δ13C and δ15N, we collected foliage samples from two contrasting locations. Olearia lyallii forest on North East Island at The Snares hosts large numbers of (in particular) breeding sooty shearwaters (Puffinus griseus). At Mason Bay (Rakiura/Stewart Island), samples of Brachyglottis rotundifolia, Griselinia littoralis, and Dracophyllum longifolium were collected from two strata within diverse dune forest and one stratum from the open dunes. The δ13C results were typical of C3 plants and did not differ significantly between Mason Bay and North East Island. In contrast, the δ15N results from Mason Bay (mean ± standard deviation, -6.1 ± 1.7‰) were significantly lower than expected for temperate forest (95% confidence interval of difference, 2.7–3.9‰), and dramatically lower (19.1–21.5‰) than North East Island where enrichments (+14.2 ± 3.1‰) were among the highest ever reported for vegetation.

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  • Caring for obese patients in a culturally safe way

    Hughes, M.; Farrow, T. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Obesity is a culturally constructed concept and nurses need to be culturally safe in their practice, when caring for those labelled obese.

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  • How can mental health nurses prove they are culturally safe?

    Hughes, M.; Farrow, T. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Historically, nurses have been required to be culturally safe in their practice. (1,2) But now all registered nurses (RNs) must show competency within their scope of practice, including evidence of competence in culturally safe practice. (3) At first, this requirement may appear challenging for nurses working in mental health, given that practice in this area sometimes requires nursing people against their will, or where personal freedoms are temporarily restricted. While mental health practice does have some unique challenges, good mental health nursing practice actually exemplifies cultural safety. Likewise, cultural safety supports the articulation of good mental health nursing practice, and the description of good mental health nursing practice will likely meet the requirements of an audit of culturally safe practice. Some mental health nurses have expressed concern that in any audit they cannot articulate the true complexities of mental health nursing. However, we suggest good mental health nursing practice embraces cultural safety.

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  • Relating to families through their seasons of life

    Tritschler, E.; Yarwood, J. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    An indigenous practice model - Seasons of Life - offers nurses a new way of relating to families transitioning to parenthood.

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  • Nurses assessing family violence - Some hidden dangers

    Stanley, T.; Yarwood, J.; Brook, G.; Watson, P. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Nurses need to tread carefully when questioning women about their experiece of family violence, under the Government's expanded violence intervention programme. There are hidden dangers in this policy approach.

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  • A review of research literature addressing male partners and smoking during pregnancy

    Gage, J. D.; Everett, K.; Bullock, L. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    OBJECTIVE: To gain a more complete understanding of cigarette smoking and cessation during pregnancy by examining the men's role in supporting smoking cessation of their pregnant partners DATA SOURCES: A search of online data included CINAHL, Medline, and PsychLit databases. STUDY SELECTION: Studies published in the last 10 years, in English language, included three phenomena: pregnancy, male partners, and cigarette smoking. DATA EXTRACTION: Data were identified and organized according to theoretical, descriptive, and intervention methods of research. DATA SYNTHESIS: A growing body of literature indicates an interaction between pregnancy, male partners, and smoking behaviors. Explicating relationships between these phenomena is necessary for understanding and encouraging behaviors that promote maternal, child, and family health. CONCLUSIONS: Current research that includes the phenomena of pregnancy, male partners, and smoking behaviors highlights a need to further investigate the potential relationships, interactions, and health consequences of smoking behaviors of men and women during pregnancy.

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  • Abusing the abused? The 'double whammy' of 'elder abuse and neglect'

    Brook, G. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The author reflects on the silence of the social work sector when it comes to the issue of elder abuse and neglect in New Zealand. She cites that the silence might imply that social work has adopted the culture of ageism. He argues that social workers are obliged to critically examine services for elders in general and those designed, developed, organized and delivered to address older people abuse and neglect in particular. She asserts that all attempts to design services have been driven by a commitment to support and empower abused elders.

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  • How well do New Zealand architects understand systems and methods for re-directing natural light into the deep, windowless spaces of buildings?

    Barrett, R. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The natural lighting of buildings is conventionally achieved directly through apertures in the external envelope, and in particular through the walls (windows) and the roof (skylights). There is, however, a growing catalogue of methods and systems which facilitate daylighting in spaces remote from these exterior openings where conventional methods cannot be used effectively, if at all. This provision for natural lighting of deep architectural space is referred to in this paper as ‘core-daylighting’. The paper addresses two main issues: (i) a range of core-daylighting systems, and (ii) the findings from a survey of New Zealand architects (approximately 1 in 3 of those listed in the Architects Education and Registration Board register). The respondents were canvassed to establish their knowledge of, and interest in, systems and methods for re-directing natural light into the deep, windowless spaces of buildings.

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  • Sex Education, Homosexuality and Social Contestation in 1970s New Zealand

    Brickell, Chris (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This essay examines the relationships between homosexuality and sex education in New Zealand during the 1970s. It argues that reading sex education debates and resources provides a useful way of exploring connections between the ontologies and politics of sexuality at that time. In particular, the advent of social movements concerned with sexual issues marked a turning point in homosexuality's appearance within formal and informal modes of sex education. During the 1970s, sex education and related debates became a key site at which various conceptualisations of homosexuality were constructed and contested. By analysing the struggles between radical and conservative perspectives, we can see how same‐sex desire came to symbolise changing sexual mores, as well as broader ideas about social order and social change.

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  • Those "Other Sociologists": Social Analysis Before Sociology

    Brickell, Chris (2007)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    How did commentators conceive of sociological concerns before university sociology was established in New Zealand? Most of us have heard of Somerset’s Littledene from 1938, and there has been some publicity given to the short‐lived Social Science Research Bureau which existed at the same time, but what else was there? Here I argue that social analysis took form in a range of other interesting and under‐appreciated locations. When we trawl through the repositories of New Zealand’s cultural production, we notice that some of the key themes of sociology – social order, social change, the state, gender relations, demography and citizenship – turn up in unexpected places. Social workers, psychologists, educationalists and literary commentators had plenty to say, as did those involved in architectural criticism and the wartime Army Education and Welfare Service. This article surveys the field, and concentrates on these last two elements in particular. It argues that New Zealand was not without its “other sociologists”; those who theorized society from a diverse range of locations in our country’s intellectual life.

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  • Understanding positive subjectivities made possible online for disabled people.

    Bowker, N.; Tuffin, K. (2007)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    The ideology of individualism underlying identity and psychology's focus on a visual ontology may serve to inhibit the social value of people with disabilities. The online medium with its capacity for textual self presentation presents a potentially new environment to operate within. This study set out to explore the psychological meaning of what it meant to be online for people with disabilities. Following the tradition of discursive psychology, we focused especially on constructions of how online experience provided alternative frameworks for social positioning. Participants were recruited from various disability organisations in New Zealand and were invited to take part in an online interview. Three key linguistic resources were identified: uncontaminated judgement, exhibiting strengths, and operating independently. Embedded within these resources was the idea that the physical and attitudinal barriers, disrupting the ability of people with disabilities to display their capabilities independent of a disabled identity, are eliminated online. Consequently, being judged outside of the constraints of a disabled identity affords people with disabilities the opportunity to enjoy a more socially valued subjectivity and a more positive identity.

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  • University language advising : is it useful?

    Reinders, Hayo (2007)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article describes a language advisory programme established at one New Zealand university to support students (mostly New Zealand residents from Asian language backgrounds) experiencing difficulties with the English language. The programme was offered through the university self-access centre and consisted of students meeting several times over a period of three months with a personal language advisor. The advisors helped the students to identify language learning needs, develop a learning plan, recommend resources and monitored progress. Not much research has been done on the effectiveness of such approaches as identified by their participants. In this exploratory study, students’ feedback about the programme was obtained through a questionnaire and the three language advisors who worked on the programme also completed a questionnaire with open questions. The results show that overall the programme was perceived to be successful but a number of factors are identified that influenced if and how students and advisors engaged with the programme.

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  • Innovation in self-access : three case studies

    Lázaro, Noemí; Reinders, Hayo (2007-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article reports the findings of a study into the use of technology in three self-access centres. It is based on the results of an earlier study that applied an evaluative framework to compare the use of technology in 45 self access centres worldwide and identified the three most intensive users of technology. This article describes the types of support offered by these centres and the technological tools to deliver that support. It also presents a case study of the centres to identify the unique characteristics of their support and to examine the effects on their wider educational context.

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  • Innovation in language support : the provision of technology in self-access

    Reinders, Hayo; Lázaro, Noemí (2007-04)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Self-access centres are sometimes portrayed as being at the forefront of pedagogical innovation. They are also said to be technology-rich language learning environments. In practice, however, the application of technology in a self-access environment has proven to be a challenge. This article focuses on 10 self-access centres that were found to be the most intensive users of technology out of a total of 45 centres investigated worldwide. The article describes the range of technologies used by these centres and the types of administrative procedures and student learning supported. It also compares these centres with the other 35 in the study to identify how they differ in the way they make use of technology.

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  • Podquests : language learning on the move

    Reinders, Hayo (2007)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Many teachers have used or at least heard about webquests. These online activities are great for bringing authentic materials into the classroom and for encouraging students to draw on a range of language skills at the same time. Here I will describe an alternative to online webquests, in an attempt to encourage out-of-class learning in the ‘real’ world. What are podquests? Podquests are out-of-class language learning activities that encourage interaction with people and objects in authentic contexts. Podquests use Ipods for instructions, language input, and to give feedback to the learner. Imagine the following scenario: as a teacher you want to encourage your students to use the language outside the classroom and to use a range of different skills. One option would be to send students on a ‘tour’ around the city to get information about various sites. They could then report back in class. But how will students know they are on the right track? And would it not be more interesting if they could access relevant information about the sites as they were visiting them? And how about if they could answer questions at the same time, and if their answers would change what would happen next? This is exactly what podquests are designed to do.

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  • Big brother is helping you : supporting self-access language learning with a student monitoring system

    Reinders, Hayo (2007-03)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Self-access and language advising are relatively recent and increasingly common types of language support offered in schools and tertiary institutions around the world. There is a great deal of anecdotal support for the positive contribution of such support to student learning. Self-access and language advising hold strong potential as learner-centred and highly flexible approaches. In addition, there are many sound practical reasons for offering self-access as complementary to or as an alternative to classroom teaching, especially in situations where existing learning needs are too great or diverse to be met by traditional methods. At the same time, there are concerns about the effectiveness (how well they help students learn) and efficiency (how quickly students learn) of these approaches and more research is clearly needed. This article reports how one centre has attempted to take into account some of the challenges reported in previous literature by developing an electronic learning environment that better prepares students for and guides them in their self-directed learning. In addition it reports on the implementation of an extensive monitoring system of student learning, that allows for the provision of more tailored language support than previously possible.

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