1,474 results for Journal article, 2008

  • Employee fairness perceptions of performance appraisal: a Saint Lucian case study

    Narcisse, Sharon; Harcourt, Mark (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This research identifies the essential factors which influence employees' fairness perceptions of their performance appraisals, and determines the applicability of these factors to the experiences of employees in a Saint Lucian public service organization. Fairness perceptions are of three main types. First, distributive justice refers to the perceived fairness of an actual appraisal rating. Second, procedural justice refers to the perceived fairness of procedures used to determine the appraisal rating. Third, interactional justice refers to the perceived fairness of the rater's interpersonal treatment of the ratee during the appraisal process. A qualitative case study method was used to gain a rich understanding of employee perceptions of the fairness of their performance appraisals. Data were obtained from both completed appraisal forms and interviews with 20 knowledgeable employees. All interviews were transcribed and assessed using a thematic analysis. Overall, results show that distributive, procedural, and interactional justice factors identified in the existing literature influence employee perceptions of fairness in their appraisals. Results suggest that employees also consider four additional justice factors, as yet not formally recognized in the justice literature, one distributive – the consistency in reward distribution – and three procedural – appraisal frequency, job relevant criteria, and rater and ratee training.

    View record details
  • The Forgotten 60%: bird ecology and management in New Zealand's agricultural landscape.

    Macleod, Catriona; Blackwell, Grant; Moller, Henrik; Innes, John; Powlesland, Ralph (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Production lands make up 58% of Aotearoa New Zealand’s landcover and contribute greatly not only to the national economy but also to patterns and trends in native and introduced avian biodiversity. However, unlike in native forest and other indigenous habitats, birds in agro-ecosystems have received little attention to date. We argue that this is due to (1) a research focus on understanding the causes of the dramatic decline of New Zealand’s critically endangered, endemic species, (2) an adherence to a ‘preservation for intrinsic value’ over a ‘conservation through sustainable use’ paradigm for environmental management, and (3) a historical view of production landscapes as being devoid of endemic and native species and thus of no conservation value. In countering these attitudes, we suggest that the agricultural matrix may contain more native species than many people believe, and that many introduced bird species are key contributors to the social and environmental performance and resilience of these systems. We draw attention to the context, composition, ecology, and status of native and introduced birds in production landscapes in New Zealand, particularly in the face of ongoing agricultural intensification. We first identify the potential roles of local habitat, landscape composition, and introduced predators in shaping farmland bird communities. We then highlight the potential threats and opportunities for birds posed by ongoing intensification, particularly the influences of habitat modification and simplification, increased ecological subsidies through farm inputs, increased stocking rates and yields, and altered predator–prey interactions. We suggest the landscape is the appropriate spatial scale for research and management, and call for an integrated approach to the investigation of farmland birds that combines ecology, sociology, and agro-ecosystems management, and includes farmers, researchers, regulators, and the wider New Zealand public.

    View record details
  • Stoat density, diet and survival compared between alpine grassland and beech forest habitats

    Smith, Des; Wilson, Deborah; Moller, Henrik; Murphy, Elaine; Pickerell, Georgina (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    In New Zealand, alpine grasslands occur above the treeline of beech forest. Historically stoat control paradigms in New Zealand’s montane natural areas have assumed alpine grassland is a marginal habitat that limits dispersal between beech forest stoat populations. We compared the summer-to-autumn (January–April) density, weight, diet and winter survival of stoats between these two habitatsduring years of low beech seedfall. Stoats were live-trapped, marked and released in alpine grassland and low-altitude beech forest in the Borland Valley, Fiordland National Park, during 2003 and 2004, and were caught and euthanased for necropsy in 2005. Stoat density was estimated using spatially explicit capture–recapture (SECR). The proportion of stoats marked in one year but recaptured in the next was used as a measure of ‘observed survival’. Prey remains were identified from scats collected during 2003 and 2004 and stomachs from stoats killed in 2005. Stoat density was similar in both habitats over the two years, about one stoat per square kilometre. Observed survival from 2003–2004 was also similar, but survival from 2004–2005 was higher in alpine grassland than in beech forest. In 2003, male stoats were on average heavier in alpine grassland than in beech forest, although average weights were similar in the other years. Diet differed significantly between the two habitats, with stoats in alpine grasslands eating mainly ground weta (a large invertebrate) (72%) and hares (23%), while stoats in beech forest ate mainly birds (31%) and mice (19%). Collectively these results suggest that alpine grasslands are not a poor quality habitat for stoats. Traditionally it has been thought that stoats cannot survive on invertebrate prey alone. This research demonstrates that stoats relying largely on invertebrate prey can occur at similar densities and with equivalent survival to stoats relying on vertebrate prey.

    View record details
  • Parental bereavement: From grief theory to a creative nonfiction perspective on grieving the death of a young adult child from cancer

    Arnold, S. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    View record details
  • Nurses' views of family nursing in community contexts: An exploratory study

    Yarwood, J. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article is chosen as it provides a community nurses' perspective about family nursing, of which there is a dearth of understanding both in New Zealand and abroad. The qualitative exploratory study was designed to give voice to community nurses views about working with families and to encourage debate and discussion about the possibilities of family nursing in nursing practice this country. To do this and to ensure it reached academic and clinical nurses to inform practice, it was important this article was published in the only national, well recognised scholarly, peer reviewed nursing journal, that focusses on nursing research, Nursing Praxis in New Zealand. This article was recently picked up internationally and cited in a literature review 'Study of the implementation of a new community health nurse role in Scotland' URL http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2012/03/1388/13.

    View record details
  • Pre-school children frequently seen but seldom heard in nursing care

    Watson, P. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A significant number of users of nursing services are ]3re-school children, and have a right to be heard in matters affecting their health. Despite nurses' duty to seek and take seriously the views of children in matters concerning children's health, children are rarely directly consulted as consumers of health care. Thus, children's voices are largely unheard in nursing practice. Furthermore, research about children's experience of illness generally excludes preschool children. Therefore, preschool children's voices are also mostly unheai-d in nursing research about the experience of being ill. Consequently, there is little evidence from nursing practice or research to show the potential benefits of ensuring these voices are heard. This line of reasoning forms the basis of recommending the need for research that seeks to understand how preschool children experience being ill and how they communicate those experiences to others.

    View record details
  • A comparison of activities undertaken by enrolled and registered nurses on medical wards in Australia: an observational study

    Chaboyer, W.; Wallis, M.; Duffield, C.; Courtney, M.; Seaton, P.; Holzhauser, K.; Schluter, J.; Bost, N. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: The past decade has seen increasing patient acuity and shortening lengths of stays in acute care hospitals, which has implications for how nursing staff organise and provide care to patients. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the activities undertaken by Enrolled Nurses (ENs) and Registered Nurses (RNs) on acute medical wards in two Australian hospitals. Design: This study used structured observation, employing a work sampling technique, to identify the activities undertaken by nursing staff in four wards in two hospitals. Nursing staff were observed for two weeks. The data collection instrument identified 25 activities grouped into four categories, direct patient care, indirect care, unit related activities and personal activities. Setting: Two hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Results: A total of 114 nursing staff were observed undertaking 14,528 activities during 482 hours of data collection. In total, 6,870 (47.3%) indirect, 4,826 (33.2%) direct, 1,960 (13.5%) personal and 872 (6.0%) unit related activities were recorded. Within the direct patient care activities, the five most frequently observed activities (out of a total of 10 activities) for all classifications of nursing staff were quite similar (admission and assessment, hygiene and patient/family interaction, medication and IV administration and procedures), however the absolute proportion of Level 2 RN activities were much lower than the other two groups. In terms of indirect care, three of the four most commonly occurring activities (out of a total of eight activities) were similar among groups (patient rounds and team meetings, verbal report/handover and care planning and clinical pathways). The six unit related activities occurred rarely for all groups of nurses. Conclusion: This study suggests that similarities exist in the activities undertaken by ENs and Level 1 RNs, supporting the contention that role boundaries are no longer clearly delineated.

    View record details
  • Elder abuse and neglect: Past endeavours as a springboard for the future

    Brook, G. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper traces the emergence of, and responses to, the phenomenon known as elder abuse and neglect in Aotearoa New Zealand and considers where to from here.

    View record details
  • Student perceptions of higher education science and engineering learning communities

    Cronje, T.; Coll, R.K. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents student perceptions of higher education science and engineering learning communities (‘learning communities’) derived from a cross-case analysis of four case studies across the New Zealand university and polytechnic sectors. Here we explore student expectations and experiences of the higher education sector and canvass their views as to the infrastructure and resources in their institutions of study, and how they see their learning serves their careers aims. Student career aims and perceptions of how their learning addresses these aims is next. Student perceptions of pedagogies employed in their institutions, along with their preferred pedagogies follows; including staff-student interactions and consideration of the importance of practical skill development. The paper finishes by considering student perceptions of support structures and an analysis of their understanding of aspects of the nature of science (NoS) and engineering. The research findings suggest the students become more independent and responsible for their own learning, enjoy smaller class sizes and interactive learning activities such as practical work and tutorials, and stressed the importance of establishing good relationships with their teachers. Polytechnic students were more positive about their learning and felt the more practice features of their learning led to enhanced career prospects. Students from university and polytechnic sectors were aware of formal learning support structures, but only used them as a last resort; instead first working with peers and teachers.

    View record details
  • 'Back to the bedside': Graduate level education in critical care

    Hardcastle, J. E. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The need for post registration education for nurses practising at specialty level in critical care environments is widely acknowledged in nursing and educational literature. There is also clear consensus that the ultimate aim of educational preparation and practice development is to improve the delivery of nursing care to patients who are critically ill and provide support for their families. Yet the ‘right’ approach to educational delivery and evaluation is less clear and stimulates considerable debate amongst nursing educators, care providers, learners and regulatory bodies. The need for critical care nurses to apply advanced knowledge and technical skills to complex and dynamic practice situations necessitates the development of critical thinking and a problem-solving approach to clinical practice that can be fostered through education and experience. This paper explores the relationships within teaching, learning and practice development in critical care nursing and questions the popular assumption that ‘post graduate (Master’s level) education fits all’. Discussion focuses on the successful development and implementation of graduate level education for critical care nurses in the South Island of New Zealand and how this development is challenging existing approaches to the provision and evaluation of formal critical care education in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Weaving the threads: Challenges encountered while educating for sustainability in outdoor education

    Irwin, D. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper will explore some of the ways outdoor education has created a difficult environment for the delivery of education for sustainability. The discussion poses a range of challenges that arise when education for sustainability is juxtaposed to traditional subjects, teaching methods, and institutional structures that act to normalise the values of modern society. The paper presents insights taken from a PhD research project that investigates weaving together the threads of education for sustainability and outdoor education.

    View record details
  • Dedicated education units: a new way of supporting clinial learning

    Casey, M.; Hale, J.; Jamieson, I.; Sims, D.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A new way of supporting student nurses in their clinical placements has been successfully piloted at Canterbury District Health Board.

    View record details
  • Critical incident technique: A user's guide for nurse researchers

    Schluter, J.; Seaton, P.; Chaboyer, W. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    1. This paper contributes to the use of the Critical Incident Technique research methodology in healthcare. The impact of the larger programme of health workforce research is extended through this paper by the methodological guidance it offers researchers in this field. 2. The Journal of Advanced Nursing is a leading international peer reviewed nursing journal that is widely indexed in 32 international databases. 3. The journal has an impact factor of 1.54. ISI journal citations ranks this journal as ninth out of eighty five nursing social science journals. 4. This paper has been recorded in Google scholar as being cited in other publications in the international nursing literature 38 times demonstrating its contribution to developing and refining the methodological body of knowledge. Furthermore the methodology has the potential to be transferable to research with other health professions.

    View record details
  • Developing communities of practice amongst e-Learning students: a New Zealand story

    Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The aim of this paper is to explore how concepts of Communities of Practice from the Knowledge Management literature can be applied to the interactions between groups of students studying in eLearning mode. A literature review was conducted that explored the concept of a Community of Practice from the Knowledge Management literature, which then moved on to look at how these concepts could be applied in an eLearning context. Particular attention was paid to the work of Iverson and McPhee (2002), Wenger (1998), Polanyi (1996), Stenmark (2002), Nesbit (2004), Nonaka and Takeuchi (1995), Skryme (2001) and Harris and Niven (2002). The concepts of “knowledge of persons as subjects and knowledge of persons as objects” as described by Matheson (2008) are also explored as well as their linkages to students involved in eLearning courses. Twelve eLearning practitioners in New Zealand from a variety of subjects were interviewed, with each interview focussing on their experiences of the emergence of a community of practice amongst their eLearning students. The outcomes of the study included that a community of practice is more likely to emerge amongst a group of eLearning students when: (a) The students have a passion to deepen their knowledge and interact with others about the topic. (b) The students already know each other, or are given a chance to get to know each other in person as part of the course. (c) The students are familiar with using the technology to socially interact. (d) The students are from similar contexts and/or share similar experiences. The results of the study are important as they highlight a number of concepts related to communities of practice from the knowledge management literature that provide a window of understanding for what takes place amongst groups of eLearning students, and as such would be of useful source of discussion for a variety of eLearning practitioners in a wide range of subject areas.

    View record details
  • Partnership forming behavior involving local amateur sports clubs in Australia, Canada and New Zealand

    Joyce, W.; Burley, P. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Due to complex and dynamic economic, social and community pressures, there is increasing merit in local sports clubs pursuing partnerships. The purpose of this research is to examine the dynamics of sport partnerships among a cross section of local sports clubs in three Commonwealth countries. Factors known to be linked with clubs in the rhetoric used to support this approach, have been explored. The results revealed that clubs were prepared to ignore perceived increases in some costs of partnership: compliance and coaching, to be able to gain benefits such as increased access to Government grants and sponsorship; while other factors, administration and asset costs, and difficulty of retaining expertise and volunteers appeared to have no significant effect. This paper also examined social connections theory providing tentative support for a perception that the social capital of these clubs markedly increased as a product of partnership and may have been a key driver. Resource dependencies, particularly as they relate to access to playing space are indicators for sports clubs to develop new partnerships even if this increases club costs. Further, results confirm the key role played by local government in shaping clubs’ general environment and influencing their perceptions of resource scarcity.

    View record details
  • Theoretical Underpinnings of Kaupapa Maori Directed Practice

    Eketone, Anaru (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This article attempts to unbundle and identify the theoretical underpinnings of Kaupapa Māori practice. It suggests that Kaupapa Māori as a concept, has been underpinned by two differing, sometimes competing theoretical perspectives. One is Critical Theory, which comes from the Marxist/socialist grand theoretical tradition seeking to challenge and transform oppressive structures. The second is constructivism, where knowledge is validated through a social construction of the world, thus is located and specific. This article contends that a Critical Theory informed approach is not the understanding held by many in the Māori community of what Kaupapa Māori practice is, instead, this article advocates for a constructivist ‘Native Theory’ approach as being one that fits better both with the community view as well as a theoretical explanation that is more conducive to Māori development. While these two theoretical explanations may seem to be in conflict with one another, a preliminary model is presented that integrates these approaches

    View record details
  • "I A Isabel, You Know?": Antipodean Framing of Jane Campion's 'Portrait of a Lady'

    Cooper, Annabel (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    If, as Jacqueline Rose argues, the unconscious dreams of nations have purpose and effect in the world, how can we approach an understanding of ourselves as national subjects–as creatures of these dreams? We trail behind us the traces of nationhood in what we make and do and choose and say, performing the productive historical fictions of origin and attachment to place and nation and shared past. These traces are not straightforward nor necessarily deliberate, nor even especially obedient to geography. How otherwise could Isabel Archer’s story, a ‘Northern’ woman’s story–an appropriate story, certainly, for the genres of heritage cinema and the woman’s film–start to look a bit Antipodean? Jane Campion’s first film not to be set in the Antipodes was her adaptation of Henry James’s The Portrait of a Lady (1996). This might on first glance look as though, with the success of The Piano (1993) behind her, established as an auteur, and at last backed by a very substantial budget, Campion was leaving behind her local affiliations and heading into the more prestigious territory of international cinema. The contention of this article is that despite its New York heroine and its English and Italian settings, the film has a distinct Antipodean framing and inflection which turns Campion’s adaptation of James’s story into appropriation. To trace this inflection is to detect a repositioning of the configuration of ‘woman’ and ‘nation’ between novel and film.

    View record details
  • Male relationship building that makes women roll their eyes: Implications for social work

    Eketone, Anaru (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Since 1994 I have worked in three sectors dominated by women: health promotion, social work and social work education. One of the tasks when working in these female-dominated fields is that to maintain any sort of credibility you need to act and talk in ways that do not offend women. One of the personal challenges I have faced is to work in these areas and still find ways of meeting the need I have to still be a ‘bloke’. Even within my own household I am the only male (that includes the dog), so privately you hold on to your masculinity, i.e. the socially defined roles, through being a husband and father. But I have also found the need to express myself physically – very occasionally through physical work, but more often through sport, mau rakau and even watching physical sport. (For Valentine’s Day I bought my wife a season ticket to watch rugby at Carisbrook; she returned the favour by giving me a season ticket to our local symphony orchestra.) There is not a great deal written about social work and Maori masculinity. This article seeks to discuss issues around some of the differences in the ways that many males choose to interact with each other and the implications this type of masculinity has for social work practice. Four examples will be described of a particular version of masculine ways of relating, which will be followed by a discussion.

    View record details
  • Court Records and the History of Male Homosexuality

    Brickell, Chris (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Court records have played a central role in research on the history of sex and intimacy between men. They have revealed patterns of policing and punishment in countries where homosexuality has been illegal, and have also allowed historians to reconstruct aspects of men's daily lives in times past. Court documents are important sources in some of the most well-known histories of male homoeroticism, among them George Chauncey's Gay New York and the more recent Queer London by Matt Houlbrook.1 I have made extensive use of court documents, too, in my recently published book Mates & Lovers: A History of Gay New Zealand.2 These records were a key source of information, especially for those years beyond the reach of oral history: in effect, prior to the Second World War. In this article, I reflect upon my use of these sources by posing three sets of questions. First, what is there? What documents survive within the archives, and what are their conditions of access? Second, what types of cultural fragments remain inside the folders in the archives, and what do these reveal about the homoerotic past? Third, I consider whose voices are represented in these records: who is speaking, and under what circumstances? Court records have been controversial sources for the historical study of sexuality. They are often assumed to privilege official interpretations rather than folk ones, and to suppress the voices of 'ordinary' people under the weight of state sanctions. While the court files certainly do document the 'dominant voices' of society, I suggest that the situation is more complex than this. It is possible to examine the intricate relationships between the dominant and the marginal, and we can recognise the interplay of numerous, interwoven voices. While court records certainly do have their limitations, I suggest they are valuable sources with which to explore the experiences, meanings, identities and social changes that make up (homo)sexual histories.

    View record details
  • From tourist to treasure hunter: a self-guided orientation programme for first-year students

    Thompson, Kate; Kardos, Rosemary; Knapp, Lynne (2008-01-31)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Students arriving for the first time at university can be overwhelmed: numerous people, diverse buildings, the campus to navigate, lots to do and general information overload. A number of strategies are developed to assist students upon arrival, but the focus is on meeting immediate needs of administration, accommodation and socializing. Preliminary lectures are held and the academic year is underway. The first written tasks are set and the student discovers that an adequate result is obtained by simply ‘going online’, perhaps using ‘Google Scholar’. A visit to the large and somewhat intimidating space of a university library can be avoided; in effect, may never need to be visited. Such students will miss a significant aspect of a university education. Most higher education institutions are aware of the problem and have proactive library staff members who provide support for students, as individuals or as a component of their programme.

    View record details