1,479 results for Journal article, 2008

  • Parental bereavement: From grief theory to a creative nonfiction perspective on grieving the death of a young adult child from cancer

    Arnold, S. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Nurses' views of family nursing in community contexts: An exploratory study

    Yarwood, J. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article is chosen as it provides a community nurses' perspective about family nursing, of which there is a dearth of understanding both in New Zealand and abroad. The qualitative exploratory study was designed to give voice to community nurses views about working with families and to encourage debate and discussion about the possibilities of family nursing in nursing practice this country. To do this and to ensure it reached academic and clinical nurses to inform practice, it was important this article was published in the only national, well recognised scholarly, peer reviewed nursing journal, that focusses on nursing research, Nursing Praxis in New Zealand. This article was recently picked up internationally and cited in a literature review 'Study of the implementation of a new community health nurse role in Scotland' URL http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2012/03/1388/13.

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  • Pre-school children frequently seen but seldom heard in nursing care

    Watson, P. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A significant number of users of nursing services are ]3re-school children, and have a right to be heard in matters affecting their health. Despite nurses' duty to seek and take seriously the views of children in matters concerning children's health, children are rarely directly consulted as consumers of health care. Thus, children's voices are largely unheard in nursing practice. Furthermore, research about children's experience of illness generally excludes preschool children. Therefore, preschool children's voices are also mostly unheai-d in nursing research about the experience of being ill. Consequently, there is little evidence from nursing practice or research to show the potential benefits of ensuring these voices are heard. This line of reasoning forms the basis of recommending the need for research that seeks to understand how preschool children experience being ill and how they communicate those experiences to others.

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  • A comparison of activities undertaken by enrolled and registered nurses on medical wards in Australia: an observational study

    Chaboyer, W.; Wallis, M.; Duffield, C.; Courtney, M.; Seaton, P.; Holzhauser, K.; Schluter, J.; Bost, N. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: The past decade has seen increasing patient acuity and shortening lengths of stays in acute care hospitals, which has implications for how nursing staff organise and provide care to patients. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the activities undertaken by Enrolled Nurses (ENs) and Registered Nurses (RNs) on acute medical wards in two Australian hospitals. Design: This study used structured observation, employing a work sampling technique, to identify the activities undertaken by nursing staff in four wards in two hospitals. Nursing staff were observed for two weeks. The data collection instrument identified 25 activities grouped into four categories, direct patient care, indirect care, unit related activities and personal activities. Setting: Two hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Results: A total of 114 nursing staff were observed undertaking 14,528 activities during 482 hours of data collection. In total, 6,870 (47.3%) indirect, 4,826 (33.2%) direct, 1,960 (13.5%) personal and 872 (6.0%) unit related activities were recorded. Within the direct patient care activities, the five most frequently observed activities (out of a total of 10 activities) for all classifications of nursing staff were quite similar (admission and assessment, hygiene and patient/family interaction, medication and IV administration and procedures), however the absolute proportion of Level 2 RN activities were much lower than the other two groups. In terms of indirect care, three of the four most commonly occurring activities (out of a total of eight activities) were similar among groups (patient rounds and team meetings, verbal report/handover and care planning and clinical pathways). The six unit related activities occurred rarely for all groups of nurses. Conclusion: This study suggests that similarities exist in the activities undertaken by ENs and Level 1 RNs, supporting the contention that role boundaries are no longer clearly delineated.

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  • Elder abuse and neglect: Past endeavours as a springboard for the future

    Brook, G. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper traces the emergence of, and responses to, the phenomenon known as elder abuse and neglect in Aotearoa New Zealand and considers where to from here.

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  • Student perceptions of higher education science and engineering learning communities

    Cronje, T.; Coll, R.K. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents student perceptions of higher education science and engineering learning communities (‘learning communities’) derived from a cross-case analysis of four case studies across the New Zealand university and polytechnic sectors. Here we explore student expectations and experiences of the higher education sector and canvass their views as to the infrastructure and resources in their institutions of study, and how they see their learning serves their careers aims. Student career aims and perceptions of how their learning addresses these aims is next. Student perceptions of pedagogies employed in their institutions, along with their preferred pedagogies follows; including staff-student interactions and consideration of the importance of practical skill development. The paper finishes by considering student perceptions of support structures and an analysis of their understanding of aspects of the nature of science (NoS) and engineering. The research findings suggest the students become more independent and responsible for their own learning, enjoy smaller class sizes and interactive learning activities such as practical work and tutorials, and stressed the importance of establishing good relationships with their teachers. Polytechnic students were more positive about their learning and felt the more practice features of their learning led to enhanced career prospects. Students from university and polytechnic sectors were aware of formal learning support structures, but only used them as a last resort; instead first working with peers and teachers.

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  • 'Back to the bedside': Graduate level education in critical care

    Hardcastle, J. E. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The need for post registration education for nurses practising at specialty level in critical care environments is widely acknowledged in nursing and educational literature. There is also clear consensus that the ultimate aim of educational preparation and practice development is to improve the delivery of nursing care to patients who are critically ill and provide support for their families. Yet the ‘right’ approach to educational delivery and evaluation is less clear and stimulates considerable debate amongst nursing educators, care providers, learners and regulatory bodies. The need for critical care nurses to apply advanced knowledge and technical skills to complex and dynamic practice situations necessitates the development of critical thinking and a problem-solving approach to clinical practice that can be fostered through education and experience. This paper explores the relationships within teaching, learning and practice development in critical care nursing and questions the popular assumption that ‘post graduate (Master’s level) education fits all’. Discussion focuses on the successful development and implementation of graduate level education for critical care nurses in the South Island of New Zealand and how this development is challenging existing approaches to the provision and evaluation of formal critical care education in New Zealand.

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  • Weaving the threads: Challenges encountered while educating for sustainability in outdoor education

    Irwin, D. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper will explore some of the ways outdoor education has created a difficult environment for the delivery of education for sustainability. The discussion poses a range of challenges that arise when education for sustainability is juxtaposed to traditional subjects, teaching methods, and institutional structures that act to normalise the values of modern society. The paper presents insights taken from a PhD research project that investigates weaving together the threads of education for sustainability and outdoor education.

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  • Dedicated education units: a new way of supporting clinial learning

    Casey, M.; Hale, J.; Jamieson, I.; Sims, D.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A new way of supporting student nurses in their clinical placements has been successfully piloted at Canterbury District Health Board.

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  • Critical incident technique: A user's guide for nurse researchers

    Schluter, J.; Seaton, P.; Chaboyer, W. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    1. This paper contributes to the use of the Critical Incident Technique research methodology in healthcare. The impact of the larger programme of health workforce research is extended through this paper by the methodological guidance it offers researchers in this field. 2. The Journal of Advanced Nursing is a leading international peer reviewed nursing journal that is widely indexed in 32 international databases. 3. The journal has an impact factor of 1.54. ISI journal citations ranks this journal as ninth out of eighty five nursing social science journals. 4. This paper has been recorded in Google scholar as being cited in other publications in the international nursing literature 38 times demonstrating its contribution to developing and refining the methodological body of knowledge. Furthermore the methodology has the potential to be transferable to research with other health professions.

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  • Developing communities of practice amongst e-Learning students: a New Zealand story

    Nesbit, T. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The aim of this paper is to explore how concepts of Communities of Practice from the Knowledge Management literature can be applied to the interactions between groups of students studying in eLearning mode. A literature review was conducted that explored the concept of a Community of Practice from the Knowledge Management literature, which then moved on to look at how these concepts could be applied in an eLearning context. Particular attention was paid to the work of Iverson and McPhee (2002), Wenger (1998), Polanyi (1996), Stenmark (2002), Nesbit (2004), Nonaka and Takeuchi (1995), Skryme (2001) and Harris and Niven (2002). The concepts of “knowledge of persons as subjects and knowledge of persons as objects” as described by Matheson (2008) are also explored as well as their linkages to students involved in eLearning courses. Twelve eLearning practitioners in New Zealand from a variety of subjects were interviewed, with each interview focussing on their experiences of the emergence of a community of practice amongst their eLearning students. The outcomes of the study included that a community of practice is more likely to emerge amongst a group of eLearning students when: (a) The students have a passion to deepen their knowledge and interact with others about the topic. (b) The students already know each other, or are given a chance to get to know each other in person as part of the course. (c) The students are familiar with using the technology to socially interact. (d) The students are from similar contexts and/or share similar experiences. The results of the study are important as they highlight a number of concepts related to communities of practice from the knowledge management literature that provide a window of understanding for what takes place amongst groups of eLearning students, and as such would be of useful source of discussion for a variety of eLearning practitioners in a wide range of subject areas.

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  • Partnership forming behavior involving local amateur sports clubs in Australia, Canada and New Zealand

    Joyce, W.; Burley, P. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Due to complex and dynamic economic, social and community pressures, there is increasing merit in local sports clubs pursuing partnerships. The purpose of this research is to examine the dynamics of sport partnerships among a cross section of local sports clubs in three Commonwealth countries. Factors known to be linked with clubs in the rhetoric used to support this approach, have been explored. The results revealed that clubs were prepared to ignore perceived increases in some costs of partnership: compliance and coaching, to be able to gain benefits such as increased access to Government grants and sponsorship; while other factors, administration and asset costs, and difficulty of retaining expertise and volunteers appeared to have no significant effect. This paper also examined social connections theory providing tentative support for a perception that the social capital of these clubs markedly increased as a product of partnership and may have been a key driver. Resource dependencies, particularly as they relate to access to playing space are indicators for sports clubs to develop new partnerships even if this increases club costs. Further, results confirm the key role played by local government in shaping clubs’ general environment and influencing their perceptions of resource scarcity.

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  • Applying Virtual and Augmented Reality in Cultural Computing

    Bartneck C; Hu J; Salem B; Cristescu R; Rauterberg M (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    We are exploring a new application of virtual and augmented reality for a novel direction in human-computer interaction named ‘cultural computing’, which aims to provide a new medium for cultural translation and subconscious metamorphosis. In this application both virtual and robotic agents are employed as an interactive dialogue figure. The main objective of this project is to create an interactive installation named ALICE that encourages people in Western culture to reflect on themselves, based on the narrative of ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’ which address issues such as logic, rationality, and self.

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  • The effects of implicit and explicit instructions on acquisition of two English grammatical structures

    Reinders, Hayo (2008)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The use of tasks is often seen as a means for preparing learners for real-life communication, a way of providing learners with opportunities to practise meaningful communication and to acquire implicit knowledge. “It is clear to me that if learners are to develop the competence they need to use a language easily and effectively in the kinds of situations they meet outside the classroom they need to experience how language is used as a tool for communicating inside it” (R. Ellis, 2003, p. ix; emphasis in original). There are, of course, many different definitions of tasks. Bygate, Skehan, & Swain list several of these (2001, p. 9), some of which specifically characterise tasks as involving a focus on meaning; “a piece of classroom work which involves learners in comprehending, manipulating, producing, or interacting in the target language while their attention is principally focused on meaning rather than form:” (Nunan, 1989), and “tasks are always activities where the target language is used by the learner for a communicative purpose (goal) in order to achieve an outcome (Willis, 1996; see also Skehan, 1998). Other definitions are more general and focus on the structured aspect of tasks: “any structured language learning endeavour which has a particular objective, appropriate content, a specified working procedure, and a range of outcomes for those who undertake the task” (Breen, 1987; see also Carroll, 1993). It is interesting to note that Breen does not focus on tasks as taking place in a classroom; the definition leaves open the possibility that tasks can take place outside the classroom, and perhaps even without teacher guidance. Other definitions do emphasise the classroom setting (cf. Nunan, 1989). Long’s (1981) definition is even more open-ended: “a task is a piece of work undertaken for oneself or for others, freely or for some reward” and does not even have to involve the use of language.

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  • Do advisory sessions encourage independent learning?

    Reinders, Hayo (2008)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Many self-access centres, writing centres and individual teachers around the world offer tertiary students help with their (academic) writing by offering feedback on essays. Many students appear to use such services expecting a 'quick fix' to help them submit their essays on time with as few errors as possible. Many teachers, on the other hand, hope to raise students' awareness of the weaknesses in their writing and encourage further study by recommending strategies and materials for further study. Little research has been done to establish if they are successful. This study looked at one university self-access centre's writing support, as offered through its language advisory sessions, and monitored the subsequent work students did to find out if they had followed up on the recommendations made by their advisor and returned to the centre for independent study. It was found that in general this was not the case. It appears that students take a rather instrumental view of the sessions, one that may not align with that of the advisors helping them. Literature review Language advising is an increasingly popular form of learner support. Many self-access centres offer one-on-one advice and writing centres (especially in the United States) offer help specifically with writing skills. The purpose, from the staff their perspective, is generally to encourage the development of independent learning skills. However, evaluating whether such services succeed in this is problematic for a variety of reasons. Firstly it is difficult to decide what to evaluate. Should such services be 'measured' in terms of their contribution to student learning? Or should they be measured in terms of their success in developing autonomous learning or raising student awareness? Generally speaking the literature on advising has tended to focus on evaluating the latter (cf. Mozzon-McPherson 2001, Tsang 1999), but it is notoriously difficult to operationalise, let alone measure these. One indirect approach has been to look at (changes in) learners' beliefs about independent learning. Pemberton and Toogood (2001) looked at student and advisors' expectations using a number of instruments including recordings of advisory sessions and interviews. They found that learners and advisors had very different expectations and assumptions about the purpose of the sessions. For example, where advisors were eager to focus on learning skills, students often were looking for answers to specific language-related questions. Similarly, students often saw the sessions as a chance to practise their spoken English, not so much to improve their learning skills. These mismatches sometimes surfaced in the sessions or became apparent from the analysis of the recordings. The authors recommend such analyses as a check to avoid these mismatches in subsequent sessions. Analyses of advisory sessions were also conducted by Crabbe, Hoffmann and Cotterall (2001) and these showed that there was a mismatch between learners' long-term and short-term language learning goals. They argue for the investigation of learners' beliefs when investigating advisory sessions as this will shed light on their expectations of such sessions and therefore possibly the outcomes. A student who comes in with practical questions may expect that an advisory session will provide answers to them and that this may help them to become better at learning the language. The advisor on the other hand may recognise that the student uses an inefficient approach to language learning and feel the need to focus on extending the range of the student's learning strategies. Unless such mismatches are identified and perhaps discussed between advisor and learner they can lead to students discontinuing the sessions.

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  • The assessment of self-access language learning : practical challenges

    Reinders, Hayo; Lázaro, Noemí (2008-05-12)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Self-access centres are a popular type of language support offered by an increasing number of schools and universities around the world. Assessment of the learning that takes place in such Centres is seen as both crucial and problematic. There appear to exist many barriers to successful assessment but these have not been comprehensively documented, making it difficult to develop systematic solutions. This article presents the results of a study of 46 self-access centres in five countries (Germany, Hong Kong, Spain, Switzerland, and New Zealand), investigating current assessment practice. In-depth strength-weakness analyses were conducted with the managers of each of the participating Centres. These revealed a complex interaction between pedagogical and practical challenges to assessment. They also showed an emphasis on the developmental role of assessment for learner autonomy and the importance of assessing both language gains and learning skills.

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  • The what, why, and how of language advising

    Reinders, Hayo (2008)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Language advising is a type of language support where teachers meet with students on an individual basis to offer advice and feedback and to help students develop self-directed learning skills. Language advising is an increasingly popular form of language support in many parts of the world, especially where for practical, financial, or pedagogic reasons students are asked to learn the language by themselves. Language advising is also more and more offered alongside classroom teaching as a way of focusing on individual learners' needs and to make links between classroom and out-of-class learning. This brief article looks at what happens in advisory sessions, what their potential benefits are, and offers some practical advice on how teachers can get started with offering this type of language support as a complement to their classroom teaching. What is language advising? Language advising (also called 'language counselling') is a form of language support. It consists of one or more meetings (online or face-to-face) between an advisor (a teacher or dedicated language support person) and a student, usually one-to-one. The purpose of advising is to provide guidance to students about their language learning and to encourage the development of learner autonomy. In this way, it is different from tutoring or conferencing in that the focus is not directly on the language, but rather on how to learn the language. Also, the advice is specific to the individual student, and the advising takes place over an extended period with ongoing monitoring and feedback (and so is different from the brief meetings teachers may have with students after class to discuss their progress). Language advising sessions can be conducted in any language that the teacher and the student share, and can take place at primary, secondary, and tertiary levels, at language schools, and to support self-directed learning. However, it is most common at the tertiary level to support self-access language learning. Is language advising useful? Research has shown (e.g. Reinders, 2006) that yes, advising is useful in the sense that students are grateful for the help and rate it very highly. Here is a recent, and quite common, comment that I received from a student:

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  • Triangulation in action: Mixed method evaluation of a professional development program for teachers of students with special education needs

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen (2008)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article presents a summary review of the design and results of an independently conducted evaluation of a national New Zealand (NZ) Ministry of Education funded contract for professional development of staff of students with special education needs in 49 schools. The evaluation was conducted as a mixed method design (Johnson & Onwuegbuzie 2004) in the following three phases: a broad questionnaire issued to all participants associated with the development; eight focus groups with a sample of participants; and success case studies (Brinkerhoff, 2003) with four schools. The most significant overall finding was that regardless of the approach to development engaged in (either action research, AR, or action learning, AL), there was an outstanding recurring characteristic of staff and supporters wanting to see the students excel. Other key participant self-report impacts from the small-scale projects on adaptation of the curriculum fell under the headings of improved social interaction and academic achievement for students, changes in values and attitudes (for students and teachers), and changes in teaching practice. Participants referred to the importance of school context factors (inclusive planning, management support) and internal and external experts as enablers towards the effectiveness of development. Barriers to effectiveness were noted as associated with initial national contract administration, the number of development initiatives involved in and lack of alignment between these varied initiatives. Maintaining and sustaining the effective impact of projects was seen as dependent on: ongoing commitment and follow-through by school management, governors and program teachers; having ongoing funding and support (internal and external); and bringing other staff on board. The Phase Three success case evaluation revealed an important element that distinguished projects perceived to be highly successful by both the participants and Ministry of Education personnel. In this small proportion of projects the participant action researchers/learners utilised ‘informed’ decision-making. Although many participants in Phases One and Two justified their limited use of informed decision-making by noting that it was either too early to validate project outcome changes, or it was difficult to show causal effect (changes could be attributed to the development program), a hallmark of the four success cases was the use of strong data in the reconnaissance and evaluation phases of the AR and AL and improvement initiatives that were informed by both this data and relevant previous literature.

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  • Productive school governance: Success case studies from New Zealand

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen (2008-01-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The rhetoric abounds concerning the types of effective, high trust, interactions that should exist for a school governing body. In practise, however, such interactions are often difficult to define, establish, maintain, and sustain. The study reported on in this paper attempted to identify interactions linked to perceptions of high trust via a ‘success case study’ examination of characteristics of productive and defensive strategies utilised by three New Zealand (NZ) primary level school governing bodies (Boards of Trustees) that had been identified as being effective. All three schools exhibited strong productive interactions where open, evidence based, discussions predominated in a dialogue (informed debate) context. The case studies provide a set of indicators that illustrate the detailed strategies that can be employed that lead to effectiveness and high trust. The initial section of the paper backgrounds the governance context in NZ schools where locally elected Boards of Trustees (hereafter described at Boards) hold high levels of responsibility and autonomy for strategic and policy decisions. Following this, the link between effectiveness of Boards and productive interactions is established. The theoretical underpinnings of defensive and productive approaches are explored prior to a description of the success case methodology employed to examine the interactions of effective Boards. The results of the three case studies are presented and overall conclusions drawn. The final part of the paper explores an approach to adopting the type of productive values and strategies that the case studies highlight.

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  • Honouring Māori subjectivities within early childhood education in Aotearoa

    Ritchie, Jenny (2008)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    For the past decade educators working within early childhood services in Aotearoa have been challenged to deliver a curriculum that requires inclusive representation of Māori, the indigenous people, their language and culture. This article reflects on some responses to the challenge of this ‘bicultural’ curriculum, drawing upon research which has sought to identify some pathways which are enabling and honouring of this indigenous representation.

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