2,178 results for Journal article, 2010

  • Sing No Sad Songs

    Arnold, S. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • What influences practice nurses to participate in post-registration education?

    Richardson, A.; Gage, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Introduction: There is a need for educated primary health nurses to develop their practice, educational and career pathways in response to opportunities emerging from the Primary Health Care Strategy (PHCS). This study aimed to explore the opportunities and constraints encountered by practice nurses when participating in post-registration education. Methods: This study used exploratory qualitative design, incorporating focus group interviews with 16 practice nurses employed by Pegasus Health, Christchurch. Qualitative thematic analysis used a general inductive approach. Findings: Seven key themes emerged, including motivation to learn, enablers for learning and challenges to accessing education. Practice nurses also described their changing roles with clients and their vision for practice nursing in the future. Conclusion: This study considered accessibility of post-registration education for practice nurses and the extent to which they are embracing these opportunities in order to meet their practice needs. The PHCS states that primary health care nursing is crucial to its implementation. Successful expansion of primary health care nursing roles rests on the development of educational qualifications and skills, as well as career frameworks. It is envisaged that, with strong leadership and research skills resulting from professional development, practice nurses will be more able to reduce health inequalities. Study findings indicate that practice nurses are rising to the challenge of expanding their roles and engaging in post-registration education. They are more likely to pursue this if constraints are minimised and support increased. Currently practice nurses make significant contributions to primary health care and have the potential for an even greater contribution in the future.

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  • Narrative strategies regarding Japanese ethnic origins and cultural identities in Japanese middle-school history textbooks

    Nishino, R. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article examines how middle school history textbooks published between 1951 and 1995 explain the origins of the Japanese as an ethnic group (minzoku). The analysis shows that despite the relatively long period from which the sample of textbooks was taken, these texts continue to emphasize two categories of Japanese identity: a biologically heterogeneous people through prehistoric immigration and a unifi ed language. Building on the latter theme, the textbooks continued to treat the innovation of the kana as a quintessential development underlying the Japanese cultural achievement. The analysis reveals that the narrative tone shifted from being emotive in the early 1950s texts to somewhat muted in later decades.

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  • Isotopic signatures (13C/12C; 15N/14N) of blue penguin burrow soil invertebrates: Carbon sources and trophic relationships

    Hawke, D.; Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Seabird burrows provide a soil environment for processing discards such as feathers and guano, hence constituting a primaryinterface between the sea and the land. This studyinvolved collection and culturing of soil invertebrates from three blue penguin (Eudyptula minor) burrows, and examined their 13C/12C and 15N/14N isotopic composition in relation to potential burrow resources (terrestrial plant litter, burrow soil, guano, blue penguin feathers). Two taxa (cerylonid beetles and small tineid moth larvae) had a depleted 13C/12C indicative of a level of dependence on C from terrestrial soil. Tineid moth larvae (Monopis crocicapitella and (or) M. ethelella) substantiallyincreased their 13C/12C enrichment during development, implying increasing dependence on marine C. Remaining taxa, both decomposers and predators, had 13C/12C intermediate between guano and feathers. Larval and emergent fleas had the most enriched 13C/12C, indicative of a greater dependence on feather C and the likelihood of co-processing with guano. Pseudoscorpions and histerid beetles had overlapping isotopic enrichments implying competition for prey, but were spatially separated in burrow soil. With their highly enriched 15N/14N and marine 13C/12C, larvae and protonymphs of the histiostomatid mite Myianoetus antipodus stood alone. Blue penguin burrows therefore support a diverse invertebrate fauna that incorporates terrestrial soil as well as varying proportions of the various blue penguin discards.

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  • Improving capacity for evidence-based practice in South East Asia: evaluating the role of research fellowships in the SEA-ORCHID Project

    Short, J.; McDonald, S.; Turner, T.; Martis, R. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Fellowships are a component of many professional education programs. They provide opportunities to develop skills and competencies in an environment where time is protected and resources and technical support are more readily available. The SEA-ORCHID fellowships program aimed to increase capacity for evidence-based practice and research synthesis, and to encourage fellows to become leaders in these areas.

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  • A new histiostomatid mite (Acari: Astigmatina: Histiostomatidae) from blue penguin burrows

    Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Histiostoma mantelli new species is described and illustrated from females and males collected from moulting burrows of blue penguin Eudyptula minor at Tongaporutu, North Taranaki, New Zealand.

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  • A new species of Carpoglyphus (Astigmatina: Carpoglyphidae) from the bark of black beech (Nothofagus) honeydew in New Zealand.

    Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Carpoglyphus wardleorum n. sp. (Astigmatina: Carpoglyphidae) is described from males and females collected from sooty mould fungi on the bark of black beech, Nothofagus solandri, at Ashley Gorge, Canterbury, New Zealand.

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  • Stability of plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH): Influence of hemolysis, rapid chilling time, and the addition of maleimide

    Livesey, J. H.; Dolamore, B. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of hemolysis, rapid chilling, time, and the addition of a maleimide on the stability of human plasma ACTH measurements. Design and methods: Partially hemolyzed EDTA blood (n = 10), initially at 37 °C, was centrifuged at 4 °C either immediately or after rapid chilling in ice/water. Plasma ACTH was then measured either immediately, or after 1 h at 22 °C with or without the addition of 2 mM N-phenyl maleimide (NPM). Results: For 0.2% hemolysis compared to no hemolysis, the mean (±SEM) loss with immediate centrifugation and immediate ACTH measurement was 11 ± 1%. This loss was significantly (p < 0.002) reduced to 6 ± 1% by an initial rapid chilling of the samples. For analysis after 1 h at 22 °C, the addition of NPM decreased the loss of ACTH from 15 ± 2% to 2 ± 2% (p < 0.002). Conclusion: Rapid chilling, prompt analysis, and addition of NPM can each reduce the interference of hemolysis in the measurement of plasma ACTH concentrations.

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  • Process and strategy influences on product development performance in New Zealand

    de Waal, A.; Knott, P. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This study is the first to evaluate the outcomes of alternative new product development (NPD) strategies among New Zealand firms. For each of six distinct NPD strategies, we assess performance by selecting the most applicable of 12 measures. We find that new product strategies produce better results than product improvement strategies, although managers rated profit margins unsatisfactory for all six NPD strategies. Our sample firms seldom reported using formalised NPD process or strategy, but when they did, this correlated positively with improved performance in all 12 measures. Firms generally recognised their NPD process performance as poorer than their product performance.

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  • A preliminary investigation into pre-competitive mood states of advanced and novice equestrian dressage riders

    Wolframm, I.; Shearman, J.; Micklewright, D. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Emotional composure is considered critical in equestrian sports. The aim of the study was to investigate pre-competitive mood states in dressage riders. Thirteen advanced and 13 novice British riders completed the Profile of Mood States Questionnaire (POMS) prior to competing. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was performed to test for a main effect of mood states on competence levels, with subsequent investigation for significant differences of individual mood states using Bonferroni adjusted alpha levels. Levels of confusion were nearing significance between advanced and novice riders, suggesting greater processing efficacy and task-specific concentration for more advanced riders. Sport psychological interventions for equestrians should focus on lowering levels of confusion and increasing task-orientated focus in novice riders.

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  • Problem-based learning in a technical course in computing: A case study

    Correia, E.; Watson, R. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Problem-based learning has been well-documented, from its early days in the teaching of medical professionals to its more recent use in other disciplines. It has been adopted in many educational institutions because it gives students a realistic problem and provides opportunities to translate knowledge into solutions. This article is a case study of this approach at a second-year technical course, in which members of the class were divided into groups and given a scenario concerning a fictitious organisation about to embark on a major upgrade to its existing and problematic networking infrastructure. The course consisted of two parts. The first group was provided with a set of virtual machines to upgrade, and the second group chose and implemented a major technology on this newly upgraded network. The authors outline how problem-based learning is used in this context in a way that informs the teaching of any technical computing course.

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  • A new sub-alpine mite from New Zealand (Acari: Astigmatina: Histiostomatidae)

    Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The female, male, tritonymph and hypopus of Histiostoma montanum new species is described and illustrated from the sub-alpine shrub Brachyglottis elaeagnifolia litter at 11001300 m, North Egmont, Mt Egmont, Taranaki, New Zealand.

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  • The effect of physical activity on serum lipids, lipoprotein, and apolipoproteins

    Shearman, J. P.; Micklewright, D.; Hardcastle, J.; Hamlin, M.; Draper, N. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The aim of this study was to measure apolipoprotein-A1 and apolipoprotein-B serum concentrations during a physical activity program. Serum apolipoprotein concentrations may be a more sensitive indicator of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk than total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density lipoproteins and high density lipoproteins. Design: Thirty-seven sedentary, healthy adult males were randomly allocated to an exercise group (n=20) who underwent 12 weeks of aerobic physical activity or a sedentary group (n=17) who acted as non- exercising controls. Results: The exercise group increased their aerobic capacity (from 33±4 mL•kg-1•min-1 to 40±4 mL•kg-1•min-1) but the sedentary group did not. The percentage of body fat decreased in the exercise group (from 21.8% to 19.5%) but remained unchanged in the sedentary group. Serum cholesterol, lipoprotein and apolipoprotein concentrations did not change but serum triglyceride concentrations were reduced in the exercise group (from 1.8±1.3 mmol•L-1 to 1.2±0.4 mmol•L-1, p<0.05) but not in the sedentary group. Conclusion: Apolipoprotein concentrations in sedentary males are no more sensitive than other serum lipid concentrations but are appropriate for monitoring CHD risk-factor change during short-term light exercise interventions.

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  • Analysing group dynamics within the focus group

    Farnsworth, J.; Boon, B. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Focus groups are routinely used as a research tool in a wide variety of settings. Based on recent experience with poverty research, we argue this method needs to be problematized and further rethought. The article draws on focus group studies conducted over seven years to argue that the method routinely excludes a key area of group interaction: group dynamics. Our work underlines how these are central to shaping group participation as well as the themes, absences and forms of reporting in studies. We employ Whitaker and Lieberman’s (1964) focal conflict theory as a methodology to follow the configuration of these dynamics within a group setting. Drawing on this analytic framework, and examples from the study, we argue that an orientation to group relations is essential to expanding the method’s sensitivity as an effective research procedure.

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  • High-intensity activity profiles of elite soccer players at different performance levels

    Bradley, P. S.; Di Mascio, M.; Peart, D.; Olsen, P.; Sheldon, B. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The aims of the study were to (a) determine the high-intensity activity patterns of soccer players at different performance levels and playing positions, (b) investigate temporary and end game fatigue in elite domestic and international soccer matches, and (c) quantify acceleration and maximal running speed profiles of elite soccer players. Elite domestic (n = 100) and international (n = 10) soccer players were analyzed using a multicamera computerized tracking system. No differences were found for high-intensity running distance (2,520 ± 678 vs. 2,745 ± 332 m), mean recovery time (67 ± 15 vs. 71 ± 26 seconds), or maximal running speed (7.76 ± 0.31 vs. 7.66 ± 0.34 m·s−1). The distance covered in high-intensity running irrespective of playing level was 18% lower (p < 0.05) in the last than in the first 15-minute period of the game (391 ± 117 vs. 478 ± 141 m). The decline in high-intensity running immediately after the most intense 5-minute period was similar between international (222 ± 33 vs. 109 ± 37 m or 51% decline) and elite domestic (243 ± 81 vs. 114 ± 51 m or 53% decline) players. Wide midfielders, central midfielders, fullbacks, and attackers covered a greater (p < 0.01) distance in high-intensity running than central defenders (3,243 ± 625, 2,949 ± 435, 2,806 ± 408, 2,618 ± 745 vs. 2,034 ± 284 m). Results demonstrate that high-intensity running is reduced during various periods of elite soccer matches, and high-intensity activity profiles and fatigue patterns are similar between international and elite domestic players but vary markedly between playing positions. These data provide valuable information to the fitness coach regarding the high-intensity active profile of elite soccer players that could be used to develop soccer-specific training drills.

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  • A time motion analysis of bouldering style competitive rock climbing

    White, D. J.; Olsen, P. D. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Limited research has been performed on competitive bouldering. The aim of this study was to quantify the movement dynamics of elite boulder climbers. Six climbers were filmed during a national competition consisting of 5 novel climbing problems or routes. Two problems were randomly selected and film footage was analyzed using Kandle Swinger Pro software to determine type and duration (seconds) of bouldering movements. All subjects provided consent, and the study had ethical approval. The mean ± SD were determined for number of attempts per problem, duration of attempt, time on hold, and time to reach between holds. Exercise:recovery ratios were also calculated. On average, climbers attempted a problem 3.0 ± 0.5 times, with an attempt lasting 28.9 ± 10.8 seconds and rest periods of 114 ± 31 seconds between attempts. Average time gripping holds was 7.9 ± 1.3 seconds, with approximately 0.5 ± 0.1 seconds recovery between reaching for holds. The exercise-to-recovery ratio was ∼1:4 for attempting a problem and ∼13:1 for forearm muscles during climbing. The exercise-to-recovery ratios allow sufficient time for recovery during and after a problem. However, the prolonged contraction of forearm muscles indicates the importance of strength and endurance in these muscles. Video analysis was found to be a useful tool for the quantification of movement characteristics of competitive elite boulders. Data collected could be utilized in the design of sport-specific tests and training programs. Future research could examine a larger number of athletes and problems and help develop performance tests and training interventions for bouldering.

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  • Product development: An integrative tool and activity research framework

    de Waal, A.; Knott, P. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The paper addresses research issues in new product development (NPD) activity, practices and tools, in particular the need to integrate the set of tools practitioners use with the praxis of how they use these tools in day-to-day activity. It draws on the strategy-as-practice literature to derive a model that integrates the concepts of NPD practices, practitioners an praxis. It then draws on a systematic review and synthesis of existing NPD literature to develop a generic multi-stage, 12-perspective organizing framework for NPD activity, and provides examples from the literature of twelve corresponding classes of NPD tools. The literature currently lacks such a framework and hence uses indivdually defined schemes, resulting in a fragmented and incomplete picture. We have designed our generic framework so that it can both integrate existing findings and stimulate research that overcomes this fragmentation. We use the framework and our model of NPD practitioners, practices and project execution to articulate a comprehensive set of research challenges in NPD took adoption and use. Our 12-perspective framework could also provide a basis for practitioners to develop or redesign NPD processes for specific situations and purposes.

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  • The ethnography of mobile worlds? Following the case of global poker

    Farnsworth, J.; Austrin, T. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article relates the current transformation of ethnographic practice to the emergence of new media technologies. It contrasts multi-sited ethnography with actor network theory’s method of following the construction of new media worlds through chains of mediators. The authors exemplify this through the extraordinary emergence of global poker and its shifting constitution across the entire spectrum of traditional and new media technologies. They argue that poker vividly illustrates how following makes sense of these emergent new worlds while at the same time it is an excellent vehicle for problematizing key issues of ethnographic practice.

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  • Building capacity for evidence generation, synthesis and implementation to improve the care of mothers and babies in South East Asia: methods and design of the SEA-ORCHID Project using a logical framework approach

    McDonald, S.; Turner, T.; Martis, R. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: Rates of maternal and perinatal mortality remain high in developing countries despite the existence of effective interventions. Efforts to strengthen evidence-based approaches to improve health in these settings are partly hindered by restricted access to the best available evidence, limited training in evidence-based practice and concerns about the relevance of existing evidence. South East Asia - Optimising Reproductive and Child Health in Developing Countries (SEA-ORCHID) was a five-year project that aimed to determine whether a multifaceted intervention designed to strengthen the capacity for research synthesis, evidence-based care and knowledge implementation improved clinical practice and led to better health outcomes for mothers and babies. This paper describes the development and design of the SEA-ORCHID intervention plan using a logical framework approach. Methods: SEA-ORCHID used a before-and-after design to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted tailored intervention at nine sites across Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines and Indonesia, supported by three centres in Australia. We used a logical framework approach to systematically prepare and summarise the project plan in a clear and logical way. The development and design of the SEA-ORCHID project was based around the three components of a logical framework (problem analysis, project plan and evaluation strategy). Results: The SEA-ORCHID logical framework defined the project's goal and purpose (To improve the health of mothers and babies in South East Asia and To improve clinical practice in reproductive health in South East Asia), and outlined a series of project objectives and activities designed to achieve these. The logical framework also established outcome and process measures appropriate to each level of the project plan, and guided project work in each of the participating countries and hospitals. Conclusions: Development of a logical framework in the SEA-ORCHID project enabled a reasoned, logical approach to the project design that ensured the project activities would achieve the desired outcomes and that the evaluation plan would assess both the process and outcome of the project. The logical framework was also valuable over the course of the project to facilitate communication, assess progress and build a shared understanding of the project activities, purpose and goal.

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  • Using ¹³⁷Cs and ²¹⁰Pb to characterise soil mixing by burrowing petrels: an exploratory study

    Hawke, D. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This exploratory study tested the hypothesis that petrels (Aves: Procellaridae) actively plough the soil of their entire breeding colonies, as implied by their well-known burrowing capabilities but contra-indicated by widespread horizonation in colony soil. Two profiles to lithic contact were excavated within a forested Westland petrel (Procellaria westlandica) colony; one, a ridgeline control without nearby petrel burrows, and the other from a steep slope among petrel burrows. On the ridgeline, 137Cs activities (estimated per volume) steadily decreased with depth as expected. At the burrowed site, a subsurface maximum at 12–16 cm depth indicated a post-1963 burrowing or landslip event. Both 210Pb profiles were successfully modelled (r 2 c. 0.9) using a simple first-order model usually applicable only to undisturbed soils. In this model, mixing is accounted for by radioactive decay and first-order, mm-scale biodiffusion. The results therefore indicated that soil mixing was not dominated by petrel burrowing; rather, petrels confine their burrowing activities to maintenance of their burrows as semi-permanent (decades to centuries) structures. However, further sampling is recommended to confirm this view.

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