1,606 results for Journal article, 2013

  • Sport development and physical activity promotion: An integrated model to enhance collaboration and understanding

    Rowe, Katie; Shilbury, David; Ferkins, Dr Lesley; Hinckson, Erica (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    As inactivity and obesity levels continue to rise, calls are being made for sport development action to be further directed towards capitalising on the value of community participation for health and social benefits. This paper seeks to highlight a current disconnect between physical activity and sport management research, and identify opportunities for collaboration. To date, the sport management literature has predominantly focused on sport as a form of entertainment with spectatorship outcomes, where professional codes are a commonly used setting of research inquiry. There has been less focus on organisational issues related to participation in sport and recreation. This is identified as a gap, given the current push towards increasing focus on sport and recreation promotion for community wellbeing. The present paper sought to examine physical activity and sport management research, to identify commonalities and potential for integration and co-operation. The outcome of this review is a conceptual framework, integrating socio-ecological models, taken from physical activity research, and sport development concepts derived from sport management theory. The proposed conceptual framework seeks to provide sport management researchers with direction in their efforts to promote participation in sport, recreation and physically active leisure domains, particularly for community wellbeing purposes. Furthermore, such direction may also enhance the capacity of researchers to capitalise on opportunities for collaboration and integration across domains of inquiry.

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  • Sport governance encounters: Insights from lived experiences

    Shilbury, David; Ferkins, Dr Lesley; Smythe, Liz (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This study explored sport governance practice from the lived experience of one informant spanning a 30-year period in the governance of two sport organisations (basketball and cricket). Hermeneutic phenomenology, the methodological framework used for this study, seeks to grasp the everyday world, and draw insight and meaning from it. The method involves a series of in-depth interviews with one research participant, supplemented by document analysis. Interviews were analysed using an interpretative process which blended the world views of both the participant and researchers. The participant lived through an era of increasing professionalisation within sport. His narrative, which tapped into his governance expertise at state, national and international levels, provides insights into the transition from an amateur to a commercial culture, referred to in this paper as ‘two worlds colliding’. From this narrative, three related themes were identified and labelled, ‘volunteer and cultural encounters’; ‘structural encounters’; and ‘adversarial encounters’. In drawing on hermeneutic philosophy, and highlighting that which has been hidden from view, direction for future research and practice within the sport governance domain is offered. These directions invite scholars to think about future sport governance research as it relates to federated structures and how collaborative governance theory can sharpen the focus in this domain.

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  • Climate change and Generation Zero : analysing the 50/50 campaign : a communication for social change approach

    Noronha, Sandra (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Climate change does not respect national boundaries or distinguish between big and small polluters. It is one of the truly global problems humanity faces today. In spite of this, there is reluctance to believe in the existence of climate change even though the scientific consensus is that human influence bears much of the responsibility

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  • A comparative approach to determining the growth of productivity of the New Zealand construction industry

    Abbott, Malcolm; Carson, Chris (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in the productivity and efficiency of the construction industry in New Zealand. In part this interest has manifested itself in the increased use of numerous statistical techniques to determine the productivity and efficiency of the industry. These efforts have, however, some degree of controversy. The purpose of this paper is, therefore, threefold. First it summarises the key structural findings that have been determined from past research into the construction industry in New Zealand. Secondly it makes some comparisons between the construction industry’s productivity in New Zealand with that of the six states of Australia. Finally it also considers potential areas for potential future research.

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  • How principals manage ethnocultural diversity: learnings from three countries

    Billot, J; Goddard, JT; Cranston, N (2013-11-07)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Global movements of people are resulting in increasingly diverse societies and principals are encountering more complex and challenging school communities. This paper presents the results of a tri-national study that sought to identify how principals manage ethnocultural diversity in schools in New Zealand, Australia and Canada. The research context of the three cities is provided by describing their ethnocultural diversity, relevant literature is examined and the research methodology discussed. Two major themes of the study findings are identified. Firstly, there appear to be similarities in the ethnocultural diversity evident in contemporary high schools in all three locations and how principals identified the effect of such diversity on their school. The second identifies similarities in how principals perceived and managed the resultant challenges in the three ethnoculturally diverse locations. Implications and conclusions from the findings are discussed, with suggestions for further research in this domain.

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  • Lost in translation: aligning strategies for research

    Billot, JM; Codling, A (2013-11-07)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    In New Zealand, the funding of higher education research has been influenced by revised policy-driven imperatives. Amidst the institutional reactions to newer criteria for governmental funding, individual academics are being asked to increase their productivity in order for their employing institution to access public funding. For this to occur, these three essential stakeholders, namely the government, the institution and the individual academic, need to have a reasonable understanding of one another’s core research objectives, and reasonable alignment of the strategies they employ to achieve them. This alignment of effort is not without challenges, for inevitably ambiguity occurs when interactions are not effectively dovetailed and clearly communicated. In addition, individual academics may perceive a lack of support within an environment of increased pressure to perform. Ambivalence as one form of disengagement may result as staff resort to behaviours that contest institutional powers over their changing roles and responsibilities. We contend that in order to address these challenges, there needs to be further reflection on how the efforts of all parties can be better aligned and collaboratively integrated. While our point of reference for this paper is New Zealand, similar issues are evident in higher education institutions internationally and so strategies for overcoming them can be applicable across varied contexts.

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  • Achieving transmission fairness in distributed medium access wireless mesh networks: design challenges, guidelines and future directions

    Undugodage, SP; Sarkar, NI (2013-07-02)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Wireless mesh networking gained an international interest over the years as a result to high recognition in the wireless industry as a cost effective, scalable, wider coverage and capacity capable wireless technology. The contention based distributed medium access in wireless networks has advanced not only in supporting the quality of multimedia but also achieving high throughput and to minimize packet delay overheads in legacy systems. Unfortunately, the impact of such enhancement has not been fully justified with mesh network environments yet. The medium access frames are required to be contended over multi-hops to overcome the challenges of improving overall system performance through concurrent transmissions. The goal of this paper is to discuss the issues and challenges of transmission fairness and the effect of concurrent transmission on system performance. To mitigate transmission fairness issues, we review existing open literature on mesh networking and provide guidelines for better system design and deployment. Finally, we conclude the paper with future research directions. This study may help network designer and planner to overcome the remaining challenging issues in the design and deployment of WMNs worldwide.

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  • Market timing ability and mutual funds: a heterogeneous agent approach

    Frijns, B; Gilbert, A; Zwinkels, RCJ (2013-10-25)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper proposes a novel approach to determine whether mutual funds time the market. The proposed approach builds on a heterogeneous agent model, where investors switch between cash and stocks depending on a certain switching rule. This represents a more flexible, intuitive, and parsimonious approach. The traditional market timing models are essentially a special case of our model with contemporaneous switching rule. Applying this model to a sample of 400 US equity mutual funds, we find that 41.5% of the funds in our sample have negative market timing skills and only 3.25% positive skills. 20% of funds apply a forward:looking approach in deciding on market timing, and 13.75% a backward looking approach. We also note that market timing differs considerably over fund styles.

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  • Why do financial literacy programmes fail?

    Frijns, BPM; Gilbert, A; Tourani-Rad, A (2013-10-25)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Numerous studies have found a positive relationship between financial literacy and financial experience. Typically, this relationship is interpreted as being a causal relationship, i.e. an increase in financial literacy leads to better financial decision making. However, a simple relationship cannot be interpreted in a causal way. In this paper, we show evidence for a causal relationship running the opposite way, i.e. people with more financial experience seem to acquire more financial knowledge and become more financially literate. This finding has important implications as it suggests that programmes targeted at improving financial literacy could be more effective if they incorporate experiential components.

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  • Managing curriculum change and 'ontological uncertainty' in tertiary education

    Keesing-Styles, Linda; Nash, Simon; Ayres, Robert (2013-11-13)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Curriculum reform at institutional level is a challenging endeavour. Those charged with leading this process will encounter both enthusiasm and multiple obstacles to teacher engagement including the particularly complex issue of confronting existing teacher identities. At Unitec Institute of Technology (Unitec), the ‘Living Curriculum’ initiative focused on whole-of-institution curriculum renewal and, in the process, acknowledged and addressed teacher beliefs and practices that variously supported and contested both the initiative itself and the professional development offerings that accompanied it. The related research project identified factors and processes that unsettle teachers, rendering them ‘insecure’, and strategies that have proven effective in supporting teachers through significant change in conceptions of curriculum, teaching and learning.

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  • Potato Crisp moisture determination using NIR data and a Back Propagation Neural Network

    Yee, Nigel; Potgieter, Paul; Liggett, Stephen (2013-06)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Near infrared analysis is a tool used for non-destructive determination of material properties and the potato crisp production sector has been using the technique for determination of moisture content however near infrared spectral models suffer from problems associated with light scatter. Light scatter results from geometric irregularities in the samples geometry and this reduces the accuracy of near infrared calibration models without preprocessing for scatter removal. Quantitative calibration models have benefited from the development of artificial intelligence methods and the neural network is now a popular tool for quantitative calibration model formation. In this paper we compare the performance of a back propagation neural network calibration model using 3 forms of preprocessed data, orthogonal signal correction, standard normal variate and data with no scatter preprocessing prior. The correlation coefficient was used to determine the neural networks methods performance and it was found that a neural network using data with no scatter preprocessing yielded the best results.

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  • Article published on the Culberb Project: Baetsch.

    Woodruffe, Paul; Klasz, Walter; Kotradyova, Veronika (2013-03)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Another of CULBURB's projects, this one in the Viennese suburb of Ottakring, involved building a small hut and commu­nity space from locally collected materials. Led by New Zealand artist Paul Woodruffe, Austrian architect Walter Klasz, and Slovak designer Veronika Kotradyova, Baetsch in tbe City brought the New Zealand tradition of the bach to Austria. Short for "bachelor," the bach is a small holiday or beach house made from repurposed materials. Accord­ing lo Woodruffe, the bach is "defined by what it is not; it is not the everyday, but a sanctuary from the everyday." In Austria, the artists installed their bach-become­ Baetsch in a neighborhood park, building and furnishing it with materials con­tributed by local residents.

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  • Play & Learn: Designing Engaging Educational Games for Children

    Nand, Kalpana; Baghaei, Nilufar; Casey, John (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The use of computer games as common vehicles for education, as opposed to pure entertainment, has gained immense popularity in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the appealing characteristics of engaging computer games for children, and whether embedding these characteristics into an educational tool enhances children’s learning. We present the results of an evaluation study done with 120 primary school children over a period of two weeks. The study used an educational tool to teach children numeracy and embedded the characteristics we discovered in the first part of the research. The effectiveness of the educational tool was measured using a pre-test and a post-test, as well as other indicators such as the frequency and duration of time interacting with the tool. The results showed that the modified version of the tool with our features embedded was more effective in enhancing children’s learning.

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  • On the stochastic modeling and analysis of FxLMS adaptation algorithm

    Ardekani, Iman; Abdulla, Waleed H. (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This study represents a stochastic model for the adaptation process performed on adaptive control systems by the filtered-x least-mean-square (FxLMS) algorithm. The main distinction of this model is that it is derived without using conventional simplifying assumptions regarding the physical plant to be controlled. This model is then used to derive a set of closed-form mathematical expressions for formulating steady-state performance, stability condition and learning rate of the FxLMS adaptation process. These expressions are the most general expressions, which have been proposed so far. It is shown that some previously derived expressions can be obtained from the proposed expressions as special and simplified cases. In addition to computer simulations, different experiments with a real-time control setup confirm the validity of the theoretical findings.

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  • Leadership development for experienced New Zealand principals: Perceptions of effectiveness

    Cardno, Carol; Youngs, Howard (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article presents the perceptions of approximately 300 experienced New Zealand principals who participated in a pilot leadership development initiative funded by the Ministry of Education. The Experienced Principals Development Programme (EPDP) underwent a rigorous evaluation that included formative (mid-point) and summative (end-point) feedback to participants and providers over an 18-month period. As the literature on leadership development indicates, particular issues arise for those who are experienced in their leadership roles and have progressed beyond early career challenges. To sustain and develop experienced principals, leadership development programmes need to be relevant, personalized and unique. The evaluation methodology used in this study employed a mixed methods approach comprising quantitative and qualitative analysis of two major participant surveys and data collected for three case studies via observation of delivery events and focus group interviews with participants. The findings confirm that the programme was highly relevant for the participants because it was responsive to individual needs and learning styles. A highly effective component was the school-based inquiry project which was viewed as a conduit for personal development and school improvement. Overall, the programme provided opportunities for both personal and professional learning.

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  • To the "very Antipodes" : nineteenth century Dominican Sister-teachers in Ireland and New Zealand

    Collins, Jennifer (2013-07-02)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper examines the educational and religious lives of Dominican Sisters in nineteenth-century Ireland and New Zealand. It considers developments in Irish society and culture that shaped the educational mission of Dominican Sisters, as well as some of the challenges facing 10 Sisters who, in 1871, journeyed from Dublin to establish a foundation in Dunedin, New Zealand. Drawing on previously unpublished archival sources, including Sisters’ letters “home” to Ireland, this paper explores ways in which the expectations of the Founder Sisters were initially shaped by “Old World” social and cultural structures and their dependence on their motherhouse in Sion Hill, Dublin. It examines changes in the lives of Sisters as their links with Ireland diminished and they began to reshape their educational mission around a new cultural and religious identity. This paper challenges educational historians to acknowledge the role Catholic sister-teachers played in the formation of national education systems.

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  • Education and training deficits in industrial clusters : Empirical evidence that managers can use to rectify the skills gap in Auckland precinct.

    Du Plessis, Andries; Frederick, Howard; Maritz, Alex (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Tertiary institutions should seek continuous feedback from industries to keep track of the needs of businesses to provide education and training. In designing programmes and upgrading curricula, there are important factors to bear in mind so that programmes "cater" for all levels of learners. The Auckland City Council financed this study, focussing on Auckland's Rosebank Business Precinct (ARBP). Surrounding communities, particularly Maori, Pacific peoples and recent migrants, experience disparities in employment. The target population were 500+ businesses operating on Rosebank Road. A total of 529 businesses were identified. Interviews with 102 companies with a 36-question questionnaire were conducted. Areas were identified and covered in this paper in the ARBP for developing programmes and curricula for tertiary institutions to provide employable students with the right knowledge, skills and attributes to grow and manage existing ventures. In the analysis we point out what education or training is necessary for ARBP to provide greater efficiencies and improvement in profit levels. Recommendations and conclusions are provided.

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  • Images of academic leadership in large New Zealand polytechnics

    Cardno, Carol (2013-05)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    As accountability stakes continue to be raised in all education sectors, leadership as a factor that can have an impact on improved student outcomes is being studied with heightened interest. This study was conducted from 2011 to 2012 in New Zealand's large urban polytechnics with the aim of investigating the nature and expectations of academic leadership. The conceptualisation of academic leadership in the theory base is fraught with both complexity and paradox and is often presented in contradictory terms. The study identifies images of academic leadership practised by directors of an academic front line, by actors in the front line and supporters on the side line. In relation to polytechnic settings it is concluded that new and varied forms of academic leadership are provided by spreading the role that encompasses both leadership and management.

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  • Developing an "ecology of learning" within a school sustainability co-design project with children in New Zealand

    Wake, Sue; Eames, Chris (2013-01-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper analyses the inter-relatedness of layers of involvement, as contributing to learning, within a school sustainability project (the eco-classroom project). This engaged students, staff and community members (including professional practitioners) in an architectural co-design project that resulted, after 4 years, in a built classroom. The paper utilises an “ecology of learning” diagram to indicate layers and show connections, which are evidenced by findings from the project, alongside relevant literature in geographies of architecture and childhood, pedagogies of sustainable learning and children’s participatory and co-design examples. In conclusion, the ecology of learning approach is critiqued and encouragement of more sustainability co-design projects with children is recommended. It is proposed this could lead to improved processes for all participants while promoting authentic and relevant sustainability learning.

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  • Post-Web 2.0 Pedagogy: From Student-Generated Content to International Co-Production Enabled by Mobile Social Media

    Cochrane, Thomas Donald; Antonczak, Laurent; Wagner, Daniel (2013-10)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The advent of web 2.0 has enabled new forms of collaboration centred upon user-generated content, however, mobile social media is enabling a new wave of social collaboration. Mobile devices have disrupted and reinvented traditional media markets and distribution: iTunes, Google Play and Amazon now dominate music industry distribution channels, Twitter has reinvented journalism practice, ebooks and ibooks are disrupting book publishing, while television and movie industry are disrupted by iTunes, Netflix, YouTube, and Vimeo. In this context the authors critique the changes brought about in a case study of film and television higher education from initial explorations of student-generated mobile movie production to subsequent facilitation of international student mobile media co-production teams supported by the development of an international Community of Practice, illustrating new forms of post-web 2.0 pedagogy.

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