1,301 results for Journal article, 2015

  • Efficiency of the New Zealand annual catch entitlement market

    Stewart, James; Leaver, Jonathan (2015-05)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Balancing catch with annual catch entitlement (ACE) is crucial both for the financial viability of fishers and for the efficient operation of the New Zealand quota management system (QMS). This study examines the information channels that are used by fishers to search for ACE availability, and notes how these channels differ between large and small fishers. Special attention is given to the viability of small independent fishers whose participation in the fishery is dependent on their acquiring ACE in the open ACE market. An ACE market survey along with extensive consultation captured the views of fishers, fish processors, and quota brokers. These sources provide valuable insights into the day-to-day operation of the ACE market. They suggest that while elements of market power are evident in the ACE market there are also characteristics of an efficient market.

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  • Panoptic reality : a review of Citizenfour

    Tunnicliffe, Craig (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Movies, and perhaps more importantly documentary movies, need to be separated into good documentaries and important documentaries. Citizenfour would then fall squarely in this second category, and require viewing for its import rather than its simulation. Citizenfour documents the days preceding and during the release of information gained by Edward Snowden, which exposed the depth of surveillance activities conducted by the NSA and other security agencies. Directed by Laura Poitras and reporting by Glenn Greenwald, the film documents the process of information release, the technological capability of the spying agencies, and the person (Snowden) behind the release of this information. ...This film and its subject matter are important. They highlight the reality of information accessibility, the surveillance that is currently occurring, the scope and depth of this activity, and government’s complicity in this activity. Jeremy Bentham described a perfect prison where those who thought they were being watched modified their behaviour accordingly. Snowden, facilitated by Poitras and Greenwald, demonstrates in Citizenfour that this prison has already been built, and is present every time we log on to a computer system. For those involved in social change, a risk is that the threat of observation may change behaviour. This needs to be resisted.

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  • A Report on the Community Development Conference 2015

    Stansfield, John; Masih, Abishhek (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The Community Development Conference 2015 was an effort by the Department of Social Practice at Unitec and Community Development practitioners to bring together practitioners, academics and students to share their knowledge, research and stories about community development. Thirty-­‐five completed feedback forms were received - summary included.

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  • Creating a heart politics for community development: the legacy of Whāea Betty Wark

    Connor, Helene (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper provides an overview of the life and community development work of Whāea Betty Wark (1924-­‐2001). Whāea Betty was a Māori woman who was actively involved with community-­‐based organisations from the 1950s until her death in May 2001. She was one of the founders of Arohanui Incorporated, which was initiated in 1976. Its main purpose was to provide accommodation for young homeless people in need. Betty termed her community development work and activism her ‘heart politics’. It was a term that represented her involvement in community grassroots initiatives and the feelings of connectedness she felt with the people and causes she was concerned with.

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  • Kai Conscious Waiheke : a community development approach to food waste reduction

    Jeffery, Dawn A.; Stansfield, John (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Organic waste, particularly food waste, has been identified as a significant hazardous component of the waste to landfill stream. The waste represents an economic loss as well as an environmental pollutant, which is digested anaerobically to release greenhouse gasses. Moreover, the food wasted has an increasing embedded energy component. As well as the energy expended in its production and distribution, wasted food requires further energy for collection and disposal. To date, much of the effort to reduce food waste to landfill focusses on post-­‐waste solutions such as composting. While these recycling efforts are important, they cannot fully address the economic waste and the embedded energy issues. This presentation reports on a novel collaboration between local government and a grassroots community organisation that adapted community development methodology to learnings from an earlier trial. The Waiheke Resources Trust was supported by Auckland Council and the Blackpool community in launching of Kai Conscious Waiheke, a grassroots food waste reduction project. A baseline and post-­‐project Solid Waste Analysis Protocol (SWAP) contributed quantitative results, while a survey and video footage added colour and introduced a range of place-­‐making outcomes, which build social cohesion and waste-­‐reduction identity for the community. The aims of the Kai Conscious Waiheke project were to: 1. Reduce the generation of food waste at a household level on Waiheke Island; 2. Increase uptake of composting activities in households to see a reduction in food waste to landfill from Waiheke Island households; 3. Develop a comprehensive project ‘tool kit’ that other organisations can draw on to run food waste reduction projects in their communities; 4. Experiment further with community development as a methodology for solving municipal problems; and, 5. Connect the community.

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  • Financing community : economic development in New Zealand

    Jeffs, Lindsay (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Community economic development and social enterprise are growing fast across the globe in both developed and developing countries. They are major components of a new economics arising from the failure of traditional approaches to address the effects of complex and intractable social, economic and environmental problems. This paper examines how community economic development and social enterprise are currently financed in New Zealand. It suggests some alternative approaches and makes recommendations to stakeholders to reduce barriers, promote best practice and improve success factors. The initial discussion uses the findings of a comprehensive research process completed in 2014 by the New Zealand Community Economic Development Trust to understand the New Zealand context for community economic development and social enterprise. The discussion then outlines some alternative social finance approaches used in the UK, Canada, Ireland and Australia, and their potential use in New Zealand if certain barriers are removed and best practice models are used. The final section considers the potential for self-­financing by the not-­‐for-­‐profit sector based on data collected by the author over a two-­‐year period. Recommendations are made on how access to finance by community economic agencies can be improved, and the potentially ‘game changing’ impact of such access. The author of this paper has an extensive background as a practitioner and academic in the community economic development and social enterprise sectors, both within New Zealand and overseas.

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  • Efficient quantile regression for heteroscedastic models

    Jung, Yoonsuh; Lee, Yoonkyung; MacEachern, Steve N, (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Quantile regression (QR) provides estimates of a range of conditional quantiles. This stands in contrast to traditional regression techniques, which focus on a single conditional mean function. Lee et al. [Regularization of case-specific parameters for robustness and efficiency. Statist Sci. 2012;27(3):350–372] proposed efficient QR by rounding the sharp corner of the loss. The main modification generally involves an asymmetric ℓ₂ adjustment of the loss function around zero. We extend the idea of ℓ₂ adjusted QR to linear heterogeneous models. The ℓ₂ adjustment is constructed to diminish as sample size grows. Conditions to retain consistency properties are also provided.

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  • Contrasting approaches to fuel poverty in New Zealand

    Lawson, Rob; Williams, John; Wooliscroft, Ben (2015-02-18)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    We contrast two measures of fuel poverty in New Zealand. The first is based on estimated expenditure of over 10% of household income on fuel. The second is self-reported deprivation of fuel because of an inability to afford it. Households denoted as fuel poor on the two measures are mostly different and the findings suggest that research is needed to investigate if different households make different trade-offs between expenditure on fuel and other necessities.

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  • Nurse peer group supervision: sharing the load

    Shaw-Brown, H. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Discusses how peer group supervision can offer support, shared learning and professional development for nurses in management and leadership roles.

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  • The co-evolution of learning and internationalization strategy in international new ventures

    Pellegrino, J. M.; McNaughton, R.B. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In this paper, we examine the co-evolution of learning and internationalization strategy in international new ventures (INVs). Many researchers have suggested that in contrast to the reliance on experiential knowledge by firms that internationalize incrementally, firms that internationalize rapidly use alternatives such as congenital and vicarious learning. However, few empirical studies explicitly examine how the use of learning processes in INVs evolves. We used retrospective longitudinal analysis to explore the learning processes of four New Zealand-based INVs, and found that their dominant learning mode and foci of learning changed as internationalization increased. Around the time of founding, congenital learning dominated, but as the firms began to internationalize, they relied more on experiential, vicarious, searching and noticing learning processes. The focus of their learning also shifted from product knowledge to knowledge about foreign markets and the internationalization process. In the later stages of their internationalization, experiential learning increased in importance, as did other resource-intensive learning processes such as grafting by acquiring a company overseas. We conclude that the learning processes used by INVs co-evolve with their internationalization, and are more rapid and less systematic than is implied by traditional models of the internationalization process, with substitutes for experiential learning dominating early in the process.

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  • Microbial carbon concentration in samples of seabird and non-seabirdforest soil: Implications for leaf litter cycling

    Hawke, D.J.; Vallance, J. R. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The paucity of leaf litter in seabird forest is usually explained by litter burial in burrows, but burial byitself fails to address the processes controlling decomposition. We measured soil microbial C in samplesfrom a Westland petrel (Procellaria westlandica) colony both within and outside the breeding season,and compared the results with two non-seabird forests. From the few studies of seabird soil microbialC, we initially hypothesised a soil microbial C concentration sequence of occupied burrows > unoccupiedburrows > adjacent forest floor > non-seabird forest. Instead, the highest values came from non-seabirdforest, a pattern consistent with published meta-analyses on the effects of N addition. Within the colony,highest concentrations were in forest floor soil and there was no burrow occupation effect. However,seabird forest soil microbial C followed a strong inverse relationship with soil ı13C (r = −0.58; P < 0.001)as well as the expected relationship with total soil C (r = 0.75); the relationship with soil ı13C in non-seabird forest was not significant (P = 0.29). We propose that soil microbes in seabird forest repeatedlyprocess a single pool of increasingly refractory terrestrial soil C, facilitated by seabird guano priming oforganic matter mineralisation. In this context, the paucity of leaf litter in seabird forest can be seen asa consequence of microbial C limitation in a nutrient-saturated system, an explanation consistent withrecent theory.

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  • Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses’ views about

    Jamieson, I; Kirk, R; Wright, S; Andrew, C (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Aim: The aim of this article was to report on the analysis of qualitative, open text data, received from a national on-line survey of what factors Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses wish to change about nursing and consideration of the potential policy and practice impacts of these requests on their retention. Background: Prior to the economic recession of 2007–2010, the growing shortage of nurses in New Zealand presented a serious concern for the healthcare workforce. Given the ageing New Zealand nursing workforce, an ageing population and the increasing demands for health care, it is imperative that issues of retention of Generation Y nurses are resolved prior to the imminent retirement of more experienced nurses. Design: A descriptive exploratory approach using a national wide, on-line survey, eliciting both quantitative and qualitative data was used. Method: The survey, conducted from August 2009–January 2010, collected data from Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses (n = 358) about their views about nursing, work and career. Herzberg’s Motivation-Hygiene theory was used as the framework for the analysis of the open text data. Results: The factors that nurses wanted changed were skewed towards Herzberg’s hygiene-maintenance factors rather than motivating factors. This is of concern because hygiene-maintenance factors are considered to be dissatisfiers that are likely to push workers to another employment option.

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  • Women’s birthplace decision-making, the role of confidence: Part of the Evaluating Maternity Units Study, New Zealand

    Grigg, C.; Tracy, S.; Schmied, V.; Daellenbach, R.; Kensington, M. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Objective: to explore women's birthplace decision-making and identify the factors which enable women to plan to give birth in a freestanding midwifery-led primary level maternity unit rather than in an obstetric-led tertiary level maternity hospital in New Zealand. Design: a mixed methods prospective cohort design. Methods: data from eight focus groups (37 women) and a six week postpartum survey (571 women, 82%) were analysed using thematic analysis and descriptive statistics. The qualitative data from the focus groups and survey were the primary data sources and were integrated at the analysis stage; and the secondary qualitative and quantitative data were integrated at the interpretation stage. Setting: Christchurch, New Zealand, with one tertiary maternity hospital and four primary level maternity units (2010–2012). Participants: well (at ‘low risk’ of developing complications), pregnant women booked to give birth in one of the primary units or the tertiary hospital. All women received midwifery continuity of care, regardless of their intended or actual birthplace. Findings: five core themes were identified: the birth process, women's self-belief in their ability to give birth, midwives, the health system and birth place. ‘Confidence’ was identified as the overarching concept influencing the themes. Women who chose to give birth in a primary maternity unit appeared to differ markedly in their beliefs regarding their optimal birthplace compared to women who chose to give birth in a tertiary maternity hospital. The women who planned a primary maternity unit birth expressed confidence in the birth process, their ability to give birth, their midwife, the maternity system and/or the primary unit itself. The women planning to give birth in a tertiary hospital did not express confidence in the birth process, their ability to give birth, the system for transfers and/or the primary unit as a birthplace, although they did express confidence in their midwife. Key conclusions and implications for practice: birthplace is a profoundly important aspect of women's experience of childbirth. Birthplace decision-making is complex, in common with many other aspects of childbirth. A multiplicity of factors needs converge in order for all those involved to gain the confidence required to plan what, in this context, might be considered a ‘countercultural’ decision to give birth at a midwife-led primary maternity unit. Keywords: Decision-making; Place of birth; Primary maternity unit; Tertiary hospital; New Zealand; Confidence

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  • Tenuous affair: Environmental and outdoor education in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Straker, J.; Irwin, D. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The relationship between outdoor education and environmental education in Aotearoa New Zealand has undergone many changes since formal education began in early colonial times. Discussion draws from qualitative doctoral research undertaken by the authors that investigated education for sustainability in outdoor education and howmeaning is ascribed to outdoor experiences. The article describes how environmental education and outdoor education had common historical roots in nature studies that eventually were teased apart by the development of separate agendas for learning and assessment, coupled with the political context of the 1970s and 1980s. The article finds that contemporary forces relating to the economy, society and the environment are now driving a re-engagement of the two discourses in Aotearoa New Zealand at a variety of levels, from schools to national bodies, and that this re-engagement signals a positive outcome for addressing key environmental issues and engaging students in the outdoors.

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  • Going commercial: Navigating student radio in a deregulated media marketplace

    Reilly, B.; Farnsworth, J. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article describes an unusual form of student instructional radio, which is organized to run as a fully commercial broadcaster. Drawing on the case of a New Zealand student station, Mode 96.1FM, we look at how it functions in a highly competitive commercial environment. The student-run station reformats itself every year and attempts to emulate the styles and success of much larger national and local commercial music stations. We investigate two aspects. First, the tensions this creates between commercial, industry and educational objectives. Second, how students become located within the commodified speech practices intrinsic to marketing and branding. We also discuss how the station attempts to reconcile these in terms of seeking out diverse listening publics.

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  • Supporting New Zealand graduate midwives to stay in the profession: An evaluation of the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme

    Dixon,L; Calvert,S; Tumilty, E; Kensington, M; Gray, E; Campbell, N; Lennox, S; Pairman, S (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: the transition from undergraduate midwifery student to working as a confident midwife can be challenging for many newly qualified midwives. Supporting a smooth transition may have a positive impact on the confidence and retention of the new graduates with in the workforce. In New Zealand the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme (MFYP) was introduced in 2007 as a structured programme of support for new graduate midwives for the whole of their first year of practice.The main components of the programme include support during clinical practice, provision of a funded mentor midwife chosen by the new graduate midwife, financial assistance for education and a requirement to undertake aquality assessment and reflection process at the end of the first year. Aim: the aim of this study was to explore the retention of new graduates in midwifery practice following participation in the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme. Method: data was obtained from the register of MFYP participants between the years 2007 and 2010. This data was cross referenced with the Midwifery Council of New Zealand register and work force data for 2012. Findings: between the years 2007 and 2010 there were 441 midwives who graduated from a midwifery pre-registration education programme in New Zealand. Of these 415 participated in the MFYP programme. The majority were of New Zealand European ethnicity with 10% identifying as Māori. The mean age of participants reduced from 36.4 (SD 7.3) in 2007 to 33.4 (SD 8.1) in 2010. The overall retention rate for new graduate midwives who had participated in the MFYP programme was 86.3%, with 358 midwives still pracising in 2012. Conclusion: there is good retention of new graduate midwives within New Zealand and the MFYP programme would appear to support retention.

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  • Essential advising to underpin effective language

    Hobbs, M.; Dofs, K (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper is aimed at managers, teachers and advisors who are involved with language learner advising. It will first give a historic background to autonomy and advising (Benson & Voller, 1997; Crabbe, 1993; Holec, 1981) , then discuss what advising means and what skill set is required for this. The paper will also look at how autonomy is linked to advising, strategies for effective language learning (Oxford,1990), and self-regulation while using these strategies (Oxford, 2011; Ranalli, 2012; Rose 2012). It will then touch on more recent ideas around processes for helping students become more effective and more autonomous through advising (Mynard & Carson, 2012). Some practical approaches for advising (Kelly, 1996; Mozzon-McPherson, 2002 2007; Riley, 1997) will be referred to, as will the all-important differences between teaching and counselling approaches. Finally, the article will briefly discuss reflection as a useful professional development tool.

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  • Looking Back for the Future: Local Knowledge and Paleoecology Inform Biocultural Restoration of Coastal Ecosystems in New Zealand

    Lyver, Philip O'B; Wilmshurst, Janet; Wood, Jamie; Jones, Christopher J; Fromont, Mairie; Bellingham, Peter J; Stone, Clive; Sheehan, Michael (2015-10)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    We combine local knowledge of elders and environmental practitioners from two indigenous Māori communities and pollen evidence in soil cores from two islands and two mainland coastal sites to inform the planning of coastal ecosystem restoration initiatives in New Zealand. The Māori participants desired ecosystems that delivered cultural (e.g., support for identity), social (e.g., knowledge transfer), economic (e.g., agroecology) and environmental (e.g., biodiversity protection) outcomes to their communities. Pollen records identified three periods when vegetation was dominated by different taxa: (1) Pre-human (<AD c.1280) – forest dominated by native conifers, angiosperms and nīkau palm (Rhopalostylis sapida); (2) Māori settlement (AD c.1280–1770) – scrub and bracken fern (Pteridium esculentum); and (3) European settlement (post-1770) – Metrosideros excelsa forest with harakeke (Phormium sp.), raupō (Typha orientalis), grasses (Poaceae), exotic plantation conifers (Pinaceae), and agricultural weeds. A fourth, aspirational system that integrated human activities such as agriculture and horticulture with native forest was conceptualized. Our approach emphasizes the importance of placing humans within nature and the reciprocity of environmental and social well-being.

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  • Effects of stock type, irrigation and effluent dispersal on earthworm species composition, densities and biomasses in New Zealand pastures

    Manono, Bonface; Moller, Henrik (2015-09)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    We investigated the effects of grazing stock, irrigation and effluent dispersal on earthworm species compositions, densities and biomasses in 615 locations across 41 farms in the Waitaki Basin, New Zealand, between April and September 2012. No native megascolecid earthworms were found, but four introduced European species were encountered. Among earthworms collected, Aporrectodea caliginosa accounted for 70% of the total, 23% were Lumbricus rubellus and 4% Aporrectodea longa. When compared with untreated locations, total earthworm density was higher by 42% in effluent only locations and 72% in irrigated only locations. Maximum densities and biomasses occurred where both effluent and irrigation were applied. L. rubellus density was 32% higher in effluent only locations, 123% higher in irrigated only locations and 180% higher in effluent and irrigated locations than untreated locations. A. longa occurred in 24% of the sampled locations and appeared to be suppressed in irrigated locations. When equivalent treatments were applied, earthworm densities were 15.4% to 36.6% higher on sheep farms than on dairy farms; earthworm biomasses differed by –3.3% to 55.8% between these two kinds of stock animal farms. Treatment effects on earthworms were evident only in the upper 10 cm soil layer. Effluent and water application may have reduced the risk of desiccation and increased the availability of resources for earthworms. However, local absence of the deep burrowing species (e.g. A. longa) raises concerns about ecosystem functioning. This is a topic that should be explored further.

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  • Release of constraints on nest-site selection in burrow-nesting petrels following invasive rat eradication

    Buxton, Rachel T; Anderson, Dean; Moller, Henrik; Jones, Christopher J; Lyver, Philip O'B (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Introduced mammals have been eradicated from many offshore islands around the world, removing predation pressure from burrow-nesting seabirds and other affected wildlife. Nest-site selection in procellariiform seabirds is mediated by nesting habitat characteristics and social information, although it is unclear if, or how, nest-site selection will affect post-eradication colony growth. Using a Bayesian hierarchical modeling approach we assessed how nest-site selection differs among burrow-nesting seabird colonies at different stages of recovery after Pacific rat (Rattus exulans) eradication. We compared nest-site selection in a community of seven procellariiform species among six offshore islands in northeastern New Zealand: four designated rat-free over a continuum within the last 26 years, an island which never had rats, and an island with rats present. We hypothesized that, immediately after eradication, birds would be constrained to nesting habitat where they were less vulnerable to predation, and as time since eradication increased birds would eventually spread to new habitat. We found a positive relationship between mean burrow density and time since rat eradication. Soil depth was the most important predictor of burrow presence, abundance, and occupancy in plots among islands, with more burrows found in deeper soil. We found that the relationships between habitat covariates and nest-site selection decreased with increasing time since eradication. The probability of a covariate having a significant effect on nest-site selection decreased with increasing time since eradication and decreasing variability in the covariate across an island. Our results suggest that the eradication of rodents reduced constraints on petrel nesting distribution and that nest-site selection in burrow-nesting petrels may be influenced by burrow density, where selection of particular nesting habitat characteristics may be relatively more important in small recovering populations. We conclude that colony expansion immediately after predator removal is complex, influenced by numerous interacting factors, but may be partly limited by the availability of suitable nesting habitat.

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