25,465 results for Journal article

  • Robust forests of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes chemically assembled on carbon substrates

    Garrett, D. J.; Flavel, B. S.; Shapter, J. G.; Baronian, K. H. R.; Downard, A. J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Forests of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) have been chemically assembled on carbon surfaces. The structures show excellent stability over a wide potential range and are resistant to degradation from sonication in acid, base, and organic solvent. Acid-treated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were assembled on amineterminated tether layers covalently attached to pyrolyzed photoresist films. Tether layers were electrografted to the carbon substrate by reduction of the p-aminobenzenediazonium cation and oxidation of ethylenediamine. The aminemodified surfaces were incubated with cut SWCNTs in the presence of N,N0-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC), giving forests of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs). The SWCNT assemblies were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and electrochemistry. Under conditions where the tether layers slow electron transfer between solution-based redox probes and the underlying electrode, the assembly of VACNTs on the tether layer dramatically increases the electron-transfer rate at the surface. The grafting procedure, and hence the preparation of VACNTs, is applicable to a wide range of materials including metals and semiconductors.

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  • Understanding nursing scope of practice: A qualitative study

    Schluter, J.; Seaton, P.; Chaboyer, W. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: The past decade has seen increased patient acuity and shortened lengths of stays in acute care hospitals resulting in an intensification of the work undertaken by nursing staff in hospitals. This has ultimately led to a reconsideration of how nursing staff manage their work. Aim: The aim of this study was to understand how medical and surgical nurses from two Australian hospitals conceive their scope of practice in response to the available grade and skill mix of nurses and availability of unlicensed health care workers and other health care professionals. By exploring these meanings, this study aimed to build an understanding of how nursing work patterns were shifting in the face of changing patient acuity, patient profiles and nursing skill mix. Method: A constructivist methodology, using critical incident technique (CIT) was used to explore nurses’ role and scope of practice. Twenty nurses, 16 registered nurses (RNs) and four enrolled nurses (ENs), discussed significant events during which they perceived they were undertaking either patient care activities they should be undertaking, or activities that should have either been delegated or undertaken by a higher level of care provider. Findings: Five themes emerged from the data: (1) good nurses work in proximity to patients providing total patient care; (2) safeguarding patients; (3) picking up the slack to ensure patient safety; (4) developing teamwork strategies; and (5) privileging patients without mental illness or cognitive impairment. A pattern woven throughout these themes was the idea of negotiation. RNs were struggling with the notions that direct patient care was sometimes not the best use of their time, and delegation did not equate with laziness. Conclusion Negotiation has become a fundamental aspect of nursing practice given the variety of nursing care providers currently employed in acute care settings. Negotiation has allowed nurses to redefine appropriate nurse–patient proximity, promote patient safety and find innovative ways of working in nursing teams.

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  • Do low risk women actually birth in their planned places of birth, and does ethnicity influence women's choices of birthplaces?

    Hunter, M., Pairman, S., Anderson, J., and others (6) (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This retrospective analysis of prospectively gathered data focuses on place of birth outcomes for low risk women. This was the type of information I explored in my Masters Thesis. Since the thesis was published there has been more focused interest in birth at home and in primary units. Do women actually birth where they planned to and if not why might that be. The research identified that transfer rates from low risk birthing places are slightly lower than internationally recorded. Also identified that Maori and pacific women transfer less. There are a number of hypotheses surrounding these results and will lead to further research.

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  • Insurance: Its role in recovery from the 2010–2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence

    King, A.; Middleton, D.; Brown, C.; Johnston, D.; Johal, S. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Earthquakes generate loss only when assets are near enough to be significantly shaken. When communities are highly insured, much of that loss transfers to the insurer. Many events in the 2010–2011 Canterbury Earthquake Sequence were sufficiently shallow and close to (or under) Christchurch to subject the city to very intense shaking (V: 1.7 g; H: 2.2 g). Shaking damage was extensive, exacerbated by the city's setting wherein the eastern suburbs were built on low-lying flatlands (formerly swamp) where liquefaction was widespread, and the southern suburbs, on the flanks of the now-dormant Lyttelton/Akaroa volcano, experienced boulder roll and landslide effects. There were 17 events in the sequence that resulted in insurance claims. The interval between damaging events was insufficient to enable the widespread damage to be assessed or repaired. Furthermore, the combination of tectonic subsidence and liquefaction ejectile lowered the land surface, creating unacceptable flood risk. This paper provides a snapshot of the most complicated insurance settlement program experienced anywhere.

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  • Against the odds: Community access radio broadcasting during the Canterbury earthquakes: Some reflections on Plains FM 96.9

    Pauling, B.; Reece, N. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Plains FM is a community access radio station in Christchurch, New Zealand. Access radio is a particular form of community radio that provides an alternative outlet for organisations, groups and individuals for whom traditional media outlets are difficult to access. For twenty-five years PlainsFM has provided a voice for hundreds of programme-makers, broadcasting in many different languages, offering a diversity of content that permits the public expression of a wide range of ideas, opinions and beliefs. Editorial control lies with the programme-makers, not the station management. Plains FM is the source of many interesting, often compelling, stories. In the hours after the September 2010 earthquake Plains FM was the only local radio station actually on air. This paper draws on the memories of staff, volunteers and broadcasters to consider the unique role of the station as a media outlet during and immediately after the traumatic events of September 2010 and February 2011. It also attempts to locate those stories within the concepts of civic engagement, social utility and media theory.

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  • Older women and craft: Extending educational horizons in considering wellbeing

    Maidment, J., and Macfarlane, S. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    While the social work literature is broader and more holistic than many disciplines, we undoubtedly still limit the knowledge we draw upon in ways that stifle our creativity in conceptualising and attempting to facilitate wellbeing, which flows on to limit our teaching. In particular, the significance to wellbeing of place and social space, the value of informal networks to generate support and opportunities for reciprocity, and the inherent therapeutic value of creative activity appears to be neglected. In this paper we draw upon a small Australian research study around older women and craftmaking to explore how learning from diverse disciplines, such as critical gerontology and textile making, can illuminate our understanding of wellbeing.We relate this discussion to examining notions of ageing that go beyond a focus on illness and deterioration, to enhance positive and diverse concepts of health in the context of everyday life. We then discuss the implications for social work education, with particular emphasis on ageing, and argue that by engaging with a diverse range of disciplines, we are able to think about, teach and advocate for wellbeing in more expansive and useful ways.

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  • Export barriers and path to internationalization: A comparison of conventional enterprises and international new ventures

    Kahiya, E. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Twenty years after the seminal work on rapid and early internationalization, export barrier research remains detached from this path of internationalization. Thus far, export research has largely disregarded the relationship between path to internationalization and the influence of export constraints. This paper opens a new thoroughfare of inquiry by distinguishing international new ventures from conventional enterprises on the basis of the export barrier construct. Using a sample of 129 small multinational enterprises, our logistic regression model separates international new ventures from conventional enterprises, with accuracy approaching 80 % on the basis of eight underlying export barrier factors. Our results convey two dynamic implications: In the realm of export research, we demonstrate that export barriers can indeed predict the path to internationalization. Thus, gradual internationalization is induced by skill and knowledge shortages, while rapid internationalization ensues from positive managerial orientation and lack of confidence in the host market. From a policymaking perspective, this study provides a basis for predicting the international new venture-to-conventional enterprise ratio within the population as well as an instructive basis for needs-based targeting of incentives.

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  • Nurses' views of family nursing in community contexts: An exploratory study

    Yarwood, J. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article is chosen as it provides a community nurses' perspective about family nursing, of which there is a dearth of understanding both in New Zealand and abroad. The qualitative exploratory study was designed to give voice to community nurses views about working with families and to encourage debate and discussion about the possibilities of family nursing in nursing practice this country. To do this and to ensure it reached academic and clinical nurses to inform practice, it was important this article was published in the only national, well recognised scholarly, peer reviewed nursing journal, that focusses on nursing research, Nursing Praxis in New Zealand. This article was recently picked up internationally and cited in a literature review 'Study of the implementation of a new community health nurse role in Scotland' URL http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2012/03/1388/13.

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  • Pre-school children frequently seen but seldom heard in nursing care

    Watson, P. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A significant number of users of nursing services are ]3re-school children, and have a right to be heard in matters affecting their health. Despite nurses' duty to seek and take seriously the views of children in matters concerning children's health, children are rarely directly consulted as consumers of health care. Thus, children's voices are largely unheard in nursing practice. Furthermore, research about children's experience of illness generally excludes preschool children. Therefore, preschool children's voices are also mostly unheai-d in nursing research about the experience of being ill. Consequently, there is little evidence from nursing practice or research to show the potential benefits of ensuring these voices are heard. This line of reasoning forms the basis of recommending the need for research that seeks to understand how preschool children experience being ill and how they communicate those experiences to others.

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  • Researching the toxicity of party pills

    Gee, P.; Richardson, S. (2005)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Party pill use is on the increase. A research study at Christchurch Hospital's emergency department is tracking the adverse reactions to ingestion of these substances, which in New Zealand are freely availabe to any one aged over 18.

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  • A comparison of activities undertaken by enrolled and registered nurses on medical wards in Australia: an observational study

    Chaboyer, W.; Wallis, M.; Duffield, C.; Courtney, M.; Seaton, P.; Holzhauser, K.; Schluter, J.; Bost, N. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: The past decade has seen increasing patient acuity and shortening lengths of stays in acute care hospitals, which has implications for how nursing staff organise and provide care to patients. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the activities undertaken by Enrolled Nurses (ENs) and Registered Nurses (RNs) on acute medical wards in two Australian hospitals. Design: This study used structured observation, employing a work sampling technique, to identify the activities undertaken by nursing staff in four wards in two hospitals. Nursing staff were observed for two weeks. The data collection instrument identified 25 activities grouped into four categories, direct patient care, indirect care, unit related activities and personal activities. Setting: Two hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Results: A total of 114 nursing staff were observed undertaking 14,528 activities during 482 hours of data collection. In total, 6,870 (47.3%) indirect, 4,826 (33.2%) direct, 1,960 (13.5%) personal and 872 (6.0%) unit related activities were recorded. Within the direct patient care activities, the five most frequently observed activities (out of a total of 10 activities) for all classifications of nursing staff were quite similar (admission and assessment, hygiene and patient/family interaction, medication and IV administration and procedures), however the absolute proportion of Level 2 RN activities were much lower than the other two groups. In terms of indirect care, three of the four most commonly occurring activities (out of a total of eight activities) were similar among groups (patient rounds and team meetings, verbal report/handover and care planning and clinical pathways). The six unit related activities occurred rarely for all groups of nurses. Conclusion: This study suggests that similarities exist in the activities undertaken by ENs and Level 1 RNs, supporting the contention that role boundaries are no longer clearly delineated.

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  • Essential advising to underpin effective language

    Hobbs, M.; Dofs, K (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper is aimed at managers, teachers and advisors who are involved with language learner advising. It will first give a historic background to autonomy and advising (Benson & Voller, 1997; Crabbe, 1993; Holec, 1981) , then discuss what advising means and what skill set is required for this. The paper will also look at how autonomy is linked to advising, strategies for effective language learning (Oxford,1990), and self-regulation while using these strategies (Oxford, 2011; Ranalli, 2012; Rose 2012). It will then touch on more recent ideas around processes for helping students become more effective and more autonomous through advising (Mynard & Carson, 2012). Some practical approaches for advising (Kelly, 1996; Mozzon-McPherson, 2002 2007; Riley, 1997) will be referred to, as will the all-important differences between teaching and counselling approaches. Finally, the article will briefly discuss reflection as a useful professional development tool.

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  • Audit committee members: What goes on behind closed doors?

    Wu, J; Habib, A; Weil, S (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Using a qualitative research paradigm, this study examines audit committee effectiveness from the perspective of audit committee members of New Zealand listed companies. The findings reveal that audit committee members perform a range of overlapping tasks and justify their existence in their audit committees by fulfilling the ‘expectations’ that are placed on them. Many quantitative research studies have examined the association between different dimensions of audit committee inputs and financial reporting outputs. The empirical evidence, however, is mixed and remains far from conclusive (Bédard and Gendron 2010). One of the primary reasons for the inconsistent findings is the lack of understanding of the actual process by which audit committees perform their responsibilities. Using a qualitative research paradigm, this study examines audit committee activities, processes and effectiveness from the perspective of audit committee members of New Zealand listed companies. The study argues that performing audit committee duties is an intended process, whereby audit committee members justify their actions and the effectiveness of their audit committees. The paper contributes to the limited literature on how audit committees operate and, by doing so, provides possible explanations for the inconsistent findings of the quantitative audit committee research. In particular, the paper invites further discussion on whether audit committee members can be (or should be assumed to be) independent when discharging their role of overseeing auditing and financial reporting-related matters.

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  • NMR-Solution structures of fluoro-substituted β-peptides: A 3 14-helix and a hairpin turn. The first case of a 90 [degrees] O=C-C-F dihedral angle in an α-fluoro-amide group

    Mathad, R. I.; Jaun, B.; Flögel, O.; Gardiner, J.; Löwenenck, M.; Codee, J. D.C.; Edmonds, M. K. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    To further study the preference of the antiperiplanar (ap) conformation in a-fluoro-amide groups two b-peptides (1, 2), containing a (2-F)-b3hAla and a (2-F)-b2hPhe residue, have been synthesized. Their NMR-solution structures in CD3OH were determined and compared with those of non-fluorosubstituted analogs (3, 4a). While we have found in a previous investigation (Helv. Chim. Acta 2005, 88, 266) that a stereospecifically introduced F-substituent in the central position of a b-heptapeptide is capable of “breaking” the 314-helical structure by enforcing the F–C–C=O ap-conformation, we could now demonstrate that this same procedure leads to a structure with the unfavorable ca. 90º F–C–C=O dihedral angle, enforced by the 314-helical folding in a b-tridecapeptide (1, Fig. 4). This is interpreted as a consequence of cooperative folding in the longer b-peptide. An F-substituent placed in the turn section of a b-peptidic hairpin turn was shown to be in an ap-arrangement with respect to the neighboring C=O bond (2, Fig. 7). Analysis of the non-fluorosubstituted b-tetrapeptides (with helix-preventing configurations of the two central b2/b3-amino acid residues) provides unusually tight hairpin structural clusters (3, 4a, Fig. 8, 9). The skeleton of the b-tetrapeptide H-(R)b3hVal-(R)b2hVal-(R)b3hAla-(S)b3hPhe-OH (4a) is proposed as a novel, very simple back-bone structure for mimicking a-peptidic hairpin turns.

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  • Risky work: Child protection practice

    Stanley, T. (2007)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The introduction of a differential response model to the New Zealand child protection system is an important social policy initiative. However, the differential response literature has yet to address the role that risk discourses play as organising and regulatory regimes in contemporary child protection work, and this paper addresses this gap. Child protection social work is strongly underpinned by discourses of risk, and this is best illustrated in the adoption of risk assessment tools that aim to assist the practices of risk assessment and its management. This paper traces the shifting and discursive functions of risk in child protection social work, and argues that Child, Youth and Family (CYF)2 social workers are negotiating a complex and increasingly pressured practice environment where difficult decisions can be legitimised through the use of risk discourses. The author’s doctoral study, which considered risk discourses and statutory social work practice decisions, is drawn on to illustrate how social workers may inadvertently compromise the differential response system – a system where the discursive functions of risk are likely to remain central and regulatory. There is a danger that CYF social workers might construct their role within such a system as increasingly the assessor and manager of high risk. This paper advocates for social work training and supervision as forums where practitioners can consider and better understand these risk discourses.

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  • Elder abuse and neglect: Past endeavours as a springboard for the future

    Brook, G. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper traces the emergence of, and responses to, the phenomenon known as elder abuse and neglect in Aotearoa New Zealand and considers where to from here.

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  • The use of yeasts and moulds as sensing elements in biosensors

    Baronian, K. H. R. (2004)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Whole cell biosensors are able to provide information that sensors based on single and multiple types of molecules are unable to do. For example broad-spectrum catabolite analysis, cell toxicity and genotoxicity are best detected in the context of a functioning cell. Most whole cell sensors have used bacterial cells as the sensing element. Fungal cells, however, can provide all of the advantages bacterial cells offer but in addition they can provide information that is more relevant to other eukaryote organisms. These cells are easy to cultivate, manipulate for sensor configurations and are amenable to a wide range of transducer methodologies. An overview of the use of yeast and filamentous fungi as the sensing element of some biosensors is presented here.

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  • Electrochemical detection of wild type Saccharomyces Cerevisiae responses to estrogens

    Baronian, K. H. R.; Gurazada, S. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The presence of an estrogen binding protein (EBP) and an endogenous ligand in three yeast species was first reported in 1982/1983. The ligand was shown to be 17-estradiol and the binding affinities of EBP were demonstrated to be similar to those of rat estrogen receptors. This report describes detection of the behaviour of a putative estrogen binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a double mediator electrochemical detection system. The response to estrogen is shown to be quantitative with signals detectable from 10-8 to 10-14 M. An incubation period of 5 hours is established and a method to block electrochemical signals produced by the catabolism of exogenous substrates is demonstrated to be effective. The system provides a method that permits the use of wild type S. cerevisiae to quantify estrogens.

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  • Third-party courseware in higher education: The case of Microsoft official courses at one tertiary institution

    Correia, E. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    A tertiary institution can purchase third-party courseware for its own purposes. The use of Microsoft courseware, for instance, though it raises a number of wide-ranging issues and challenges, can offer significant cost-effective benefits to an academic institution, especially one having to adapt to declining levels of funding. Large providers enjoy the economies of scale to be able to keep course material current, and produce not just information in paper format, but also multimedia materials that appeal to diverse students and improve the quality of teaching and learning in higher education.

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  • Student perceptions of higher education science and engineering learning communities

    Cronje, T.; Coll, R.K. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper presents student perceptions of higher education science and engineering learning communities (‘learning communities’) derived from a cross-case analysis of four case studies across the New Zealand university and polytechnic sectors. Here we explore student expectations and experiences of the higher education sector and canvass their views as to the infrastructure and resources in their institutions of study, and how they see their learning serves their careers aims. Student career aims and perceptions of how their learning addresses these aims is next. Student perceptions of pedagogies employed in their institutions, along with their preferred pedagogies follows; including staff-student interactions and consideration of the importance of practical skill development. The paper finishes by considering student perceptions of support structures and an analysis of their understanding of aspects of the nature of science (NoS) and engineering. The research findings suggest the students become more independent and responsible for their own learning, enjoy smaller class sizes and interactive learning activities such as practical work and tutorials, and stressed the importance of establishing good relationships with their teachers. Polytechnic students were more positive about their learning and felt the more practice features of their learning led to enhanced career prospects. Students from university and polytechnic sectors were aware of formal learning support structures, but only used them as a last resort; instead first working with peers and teachers.

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