25,455 results for Journal article

  • Anti-envelope antibody responses in individuals at high risk of hepatitis C virus who resist infection

    Swann, RE; Mandalou, P; Robinson, MW; Ow, Mei; Foung, SKH; McLauchlan, J; Patel, AH; Cramp, ME (2016-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Injection drug users uninfected by hepatitis C virus (HCV) despite likely repeated exposure through high-risk behaviour are well documented. Factors preventing infection in these individuals are incompletely understood. Here, we looked for anti-HCV-envelope antibody responses in a cohort of repeatedly exposed but uninfected subjects. Forty-two hepatitis C diagnostic antibody- and RNA-negative injection drug users at high risk of exposure were studied and findings compared to healthy controls and cases with chronic HCV infection. Purified IgGs from sera were tested by ELISA for binding to genotype 1a and 3a envelope glycoproteins E1E2 with further testing for IgG and IgM reactivity against soluble E2. Virus-neutralizing activity was assessed using an HCV pseudoparticle system. Uninfected subjects demonstrated significantly greater IgG and IgM reactivities to envelope glycoproteins than healthy controls with IgG from 6 individuals additionally showing significant neutralization. This study is the first to describe humoral immunological responses targeting the HCV envelope, important for viral neutralization, in exposed uninfected individuals. A subset of these cases also had evidence of viral neutralization via anti-envelope antibodies. In addition to confirming viral exposure, the presence of specific anti-envelope antibodies may be a factor that helps these individuals resist HCV infection.

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  • Treatment of gonorrhoea in Auckland, New Zealand: marked variation in prescriber adherence to treatment guidelines

    Forster, R; Ng, D; Upton, A; Franklin, R; Thomas, Mark (2017-06)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background The relentless emergence and spread of strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae that are resistant to many antimicrobial agents has led to frequent changes in treatment guidelines, with a consequent risk that prescribers may not be aware of current guidelines. Aim To determine the proportion of patients with gonorrhoea who were treated with a regimen consistent with the New Zealand Sexual Health Society (NZSHS) guidelines. Methods We audited the treatment given to adult patients with laboratory-proven gonorrhoea in Auckland, New Zealand, during the first 6 months of 2015. Results Treatment compliant with the current NZSHS guidelines was administered in only 65% (458/706) episodes overall. Guideline-compliant treatment was much more likely to be prescribed for patients who presented to a sexual health clinic (89%) than for patients who presented to either a general practice or other community clinic (52%) or to a hospital (56%) (P?????0.0001). Overall, 52 of 706 (7%) episodes were not treated with any antimicrobial regimen by the service that diagnosed the patients??? gonorrhoea, 13 of 62 (21%) episodes in patients who presented to a hospital, 34 of 403 (8%) episodes in patients who presented to a general practice or other community clinic and 5 of 241 (2%) episodes in patients who presented to a sexual health clinic (P?????0.0001). Conclusion Low levels of compliance with treatment guidelines increase the risk that antibiotic-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae will spread within the Auckland region. Improved compliance with treatment guidelines, particularly in patients who present either to general practice or to hospitals, is necessary to maintain the efficacy of current treatment regimens.

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  • Revised stratigraphy and chronology for Homo floresiensis at Liang Bua in Indonesia

    Sutikna, T; Tocheri, MW; Morwood, MJ; Saptomo, EW; Jatmiko; Awe, RD; Wasisto, S; Westaway, KE; Aubert, M; Li, B; Zhao, J-X; Storey, M; Alloway, Brent; Morley, MW; Meijer, HJM; van den Bergh, GD; Gr??n, R; Dosseto, A; Brumm, A; Jungers, WL; Roberts, RG (2016-04-21)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Diversity and Prevalence of Sexual Orientation Self-Labels in a New Zealand National Sample

    Greaves, Lara; Barlow, FK; Lee, CHJ; Matika, CM; Wang, W; Lindsay, Cinnamon; Case, CJB; Sengupta, NK; Huang, Y; Cowie, Lucy; Stronge, Samantha; Storey, M; De Souza, L; Manuela, Sam; Hammond, MD; Milojev, P; Townrow, CS; Muriwai, E; Satherley, N; Fraser, G; West-Newman, T; Houkamau, Carla; Bulbulia, J; Osborne, Daniel; Wilson, MS; Sibley, Christopher (2017-07)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this study, we asked participants to "describe their sexual orientation" in an open-ended measure of self-generated sexual orientation. The question was included as part of the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study (N??=??18,261) 2013/2014 wave, a national probability survey conducted shortly after the first legal same-sex marriages in New Zealand. We present a two-level classification scheme to address questions about the prevalence of, and demographic differences between, sexual orientations. At the most detailed level of the coding scheme, 49 unique categories were generated by participant responses. Of those who responded with the following, significantly more were women: bisexual (2.1??% of women, compared to 1.5??% of men), bicurious (0.7??% of women, 0.4??% of men), and asexual (0.4??% of women and less than 0.1??% of men). However, significantly fewer women than men reported being lesbian or gay (1.8??% of women, compared to 3.5??% of men). Those openly identifying as bicurious, bisexual, or lesbian/gay were significantly younger than those with a heterosexual orientation. This study shows diversity in the terms used in self-generated sexual orientations, and provides up-to-date gender, age, and prevalence estimates for the New Zealand population. Finally, results reveal that a substantial minority of participants may not have understood the question about sexual orientation.

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  • Correction: In Arroll B, Kenealy T, Kerse N.(2003) Do delayed prescriptions reduce antibiotic use in respiratory tract infections? A systematic review (Br J Gen Pract 2003; 53: 871???877)

    Arroll, Bruce; Kenealy, Timothy; Kerse, Ngaire (2004-02)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Bispectral Index: A measure of depth of sleep?

    Sleigh, James W.; Andrzejowski, John; Steyn-Ross, D. Alistair; Steyn-Ross, Moira L. (1999)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    How does physiological sleep affect the Bispectral Index (BIS)? We collected electroencephalographic (EEG) data from five subjects during the early part of the night, comparing the changes in the BIS with the conventional EEG stages of sleep. We found that the BIS was a consistent marker of depth of sleep. Light sleep occurred at BIS values of 75–90, slow-wave sleep occurred at BIS values of 20–70, and rapid eye movement sleep occurred at BIS values of 75–92. The effects of natural sleep on the BIS seem to be similar to the effects of general anesthesia on the BIS. The BIS may have a role in monitoring depth of sleep. Implications: Electroencephalographic data were collected from five subjects during sleep. We found that the Bispectral Index decreased during increasing depth of sleep in a fashion very similar to the decrease in Bispectral Index that occurs during general anesthesia. This study further highlights the electroencephalographic similarities of states of sleep and general anesthesia.

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  • Food webs in forest and pasture streams in the Waikato region, New Zealand: A study based on analyses of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen, and fish gut contents.

    Hicks, Brendan J. (1997-12-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Stable isotopes of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) were studied in 11 stream communities in the Waikato region of New Zealand. From comparisons of mean d13C and d15N values, food webs in the shaded, forest streams were clearly based on allochthonous material (conditioned leaf litter and terrestrial invertebrates). Autotrophs in forest streams were not a significant C source for the food webs. However, the C source of food webs in the unshaded pasture streams appeared to be a mixture of allochthonous and autochthonous material. Conditioned leaf litter appeared to contribute to the pasture stream food webs, and the d13C and d15N of some samples of epilithic diatoms indicated their consumption by invertebrates in pasture streams. Fish ate a wide range of aquatic invertebrates; longfinned eels (Anguilla dieffenbachiai) and banded kokopu (Galaxias fasciatus) also had a large proportion of terrestrial invertebrates in their diet. Filamentous green algae were found only at pasture sites, where they were sometimes abundant. The wide range of d13C values of filamentous green algae (-18.8 to -29.7[[perthousand]]) complicated understanding of their role in the stream food webs. The d13C values of Cladophora were related to water velocity, with more 13C-enriched values in pools than in runs (-23.2[[perthousand]] in pools, mean velocity 0.12 m s-1; -28.1[[perthousand]] in runs, mean velocity 0.24 m s-1). Crayfish and the gastropod mollusc Potamopyrgus appeared to be the only invertebrates to eat filamentous green algae.

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  • Synthesis and X-ray structures of triphenylphosphine-mercury(II) thiosalicylate complexes: novel aggregation processes

    Nicholson, Brian K.; Henderson, William (2002-06-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Reaction of [HgCl2(PPh3)2] with one equivalent of thiosalicylic acid (tsalH2, HSC6H4CO2H) and excess triethylamine, followed by recrystallisation from dichloromethane-diethyl ether gives the compound [Hg2(tsal)2(PPh3)2] (2). This has a bis(S,O)-chelated mercury centre with a nido-trigonal bipyramidal coodination, with the four oxygens of the two carboxylates also coordinated to a Hg(PPh3)2 moiety. When a reduced quantity of pyridine was used as the base a different crystalline product was isolated. This was characterised as [Hg2(tsal)2(PPh3)2][Hg(tsalH)2] (3), which contains the same [Hg2(tsal)2(PPh3)2] moiety found for 2, co-crystallised with a [Hg(tsalH)2]. The two mercury-thiosalicylate species are connected by means of O-H O hydrogen bonding.

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  • The early Pliocene Titiokura Formation: stratigraphy of a thick, mixed carbonate-siliciclastic shelf succession in Hawke's Bay Basin, New Zealand

    Bland, Kyle J.; Kamp, Peter J.J.; Pallentin, Arne; Graafhuis, Rhys B.; Nelson, Campbell S.; Caron, Vincent (2004-12-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This paper presents a systematic stratigraphic description of the architecture of the early Pliocene Titiokura Formation (emended) in the Te Waka and Maungaharuru Ranges of western Hawke's Bay, and presents a facies, sequence stratigraphic, and paleoenvironmental analysis of the sedimentary succession. The Titiokura Formation is of early Pliocene (Opoitian-Waipipian) age, and unconformably overlies Mokonui Formation, which is a regressive late Miocene and early Pliocene (Kapitean to early Opoitian) succession. In the Te Waka Range and the southern parts of the Maungaharuru Range, the Titiokura Formation comprises a single limestone sheet 20-50 m thick, with calcareous sandstone parts. In the vicinity of Taraponui Trig, and to the northeast, the results of 1:50 000 mapping show that the limestone gradually partitions into five members, which thicken markedly to the northeast to total thicknesses of c. 730 m, and concomitantly become dominated by siliciclastic sandstone. The members (all new) from lower to upper are: Naumai Member, Te Rangi Member, Taraponui Member, Bellbird Bush Member, and Opouahi Member. The lower four members are inferred to each comprise an obliquity-controlled 41 000 yr 6th order sequence, and the Opouahi Member at least two such sequences. The sequences typically have the following architectural elements from bottom to top: disconformable sequence boundary that formed as a transgressive surface of erosion; thin transgressive systems tracts (TSTs) with onlap and backlap shellbeds, or alternatively, a single compound shellbed; downlap surface; and very thick (70-200 m) highstand (HST) and regressive systems tracts (RST) composed of fine sandstone. The sequences in the Opouahi Member have cryptic TSTs, sandy siltstone to silty sandstone HSTs, and cross-bedded, differentially cemented, fine sandstone RSTs; a separate variant is an 11 m thick bioclastic limestone (grainstone and packstone) at the top of the member that crops out in the vicinity of Lake Opouahi. Lithostratigraphic correlations along the crest of the ranges suggest that the Titiokura Formation, and its correlatives to the south around Puketitiri, represent a shoreline-to-shelf linked depositional system. Carbonate production was focused around a rocky seascape as the system onlapped basement in the south, with dispersal and deposition of the comminuted carbonate on an inner shelf to the north, which was devoid of siliciclastic sediment input. The rates of both subsidence and siliciclastic sediment flux increased rapidly to the northeast of the carbonate "platform", with active progradation and offlap of the depositional system into more axial parts of Hawke's Bay Basin.

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  • Contrasting carbonate depositional systems for Pliocene cool-water limestones cropping out in central Hawke's Bay, New Zealand

    Caron, Vincent; Nelson, Campbell S.; Kamp, Peter J.J. (2004-12-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Pliocene limestone formations in central Hawke's Bay (eastern North Island, New Zealand) accumulated on and near the margins of a narrow forearc basin seaway within the convergent Australia/Pacific plate boundary zone. The active tectonic setting and varied paleogeographic features of the limestone units investigated, in association with probable glacioeustatic sea-level fluctuations, resulted in complex stratigraphic architectures and contrasting types of carbonate accumulation on either side of the seaway. Here, we recognise recurring patterns of sedimentary facies, and sequences and systems tracts bounded by key physical surfaces within the limestone sheets. The facies types range from Bioclastic (B) to Siliciclastic (S) end-members via Mixed (M) carbonate-siliciclastic deposits. Skeletal components are typical cool-water associations dominated by epifaunal calcitic bivalves, bryozoans, and especially barnacles. Siliciclastic contents vary from one formation to another, and highlight siliciclastic-rich limestone units in the western ranges versus siliciclastic-poor limestone units in the eastern coastal hills. Heterogeneities in facies types, stratal patterns, and also in diagenetic pathways between eastern and western limestone units are considered to originate in the coeval occurrence in different parts of the forearc basin of two main morphodynamic carbonate systems over time.

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  • Late Miocene to early Pliocene biofacies of Wanganui and Taranaki Basins, New Zealand: Applications to paleoenvironmental and sequence stratigraphic analysis

    Hendy, Austin J.W.; Kamp, Peter J.J. (2004-12-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The Matemateaonga Formation is late Miocene to early Pliocene (upper Tongaporutuan to lower Opoitian New Zealand Stages) in age. The formation comprises chiefly shellbeds, siliciclastic sandstone, and siltstone units and to a lesser extent non-marine and shallow marine conglomerate and rare paralic facies. The Matemateaonga Formation accumulated chiefly in shelf paleoenvironments during basement onlap and progradation of a late Miocene to early Pliocene continental margin wedge in the Wanganui and Taranaki Basins. The formation is strongly cyclothemic, being characterised by recurrent vertically stacked facies successions, bounded by sequence boundaries. These facies accumulated in a range of shoreface to mid-outer shelf paleoenvironments during conditions of successively oscillating sea level. This sequential repetition of facies and the biofacies they enclose are the result of sixth-order glacio-eustatic cyclicity. Macrofaunal associations have been identified from statistical analysis of macrofossil occurrences collected from multiple sequences. Each association is restricted to particular lithofacies and stratal positions and shows a consistent order and/or position within the sequences. This pattern of temporal paleoecologic change appears to be the result of lateral, facies-related shifting of broad biofacies belts, or habitat-tracking, in response to fluctuations of relative sea level, sediment flux, and other associated paleoenvironmental variables. The associations also show strong similarity in terms of their generic composition to biofacies identified in younger sedimentary strata and the modern marine benthic environment in New Zealand.

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  • An electrospray mass spectrometry-directed survey of the coordination chemistry of the metalloligand [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(PPh₃)₄] with platinum(II) and palladium(II) chloride substrates: influence of metal–ligand lability on product type

    Fong, S.W. Audi; Hor, T.S. Andy; Devoy, Sarah M.; Waugh, Brendan Arthur; Nicholson, Brian K.; Henderson, William (2004-05-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The reactivity of the metalloligand [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(PPh₃)₄] towards a wide range of platinum(II) and palladium(II) chloride complex substrates [L₂MCl₂] has been explored, using the technique of electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry to directly analyse reaction solutions. In the majority of cases, products are formed by addition of the ML₂²⁺ fragment to the {Pt₂S₂} core, giving trinuclear species [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(PPh₃)₄ML₂]²⁺. The adducts with Pt(diene) [diene=cyclo-octa-1,5-diene (cod), norbornadiene], Pd(cod), Pd(bipy) (bipy=2,2′-bipyridine), Pt(PMe₃)₂ and Pt(PTA)₂ (PTA=phosphatriaza-adamantane) moieties were synthesised and characterised on the macroscopic scale, with [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(PPh₃)₄Pt(cod)] (BF₄)₂ and [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(PPh₃)₄Pd(bipy)] (PF₆)₂ also characterised by X-ray diffraction studies. No metal scrambling was found to occur, as has been observed in some previous cases involving the related complexes [Pt₂(μ-Se)₂(PPh₃)₄] and [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(dppe)₂] (dppe=Ph₂PCH₂CH₂PPh₂). With cis-[PtCl₂(SOMe₂)₂] the species [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(PPh₃)₄PtCl(SOMe₂)]⁺ was formed, as a result of the lability of the SOMe2 ligand. With palladium(II)-phosphine systems, the observed product species is dependent on the phosphine; the bulky PPh₃ ligand in [PdCl₂(PPh₃)₂] leads primarily to the analogous known species [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(PPh₃)₄PdCl(PPh₃)]⁺, and a small amount of the metal-scrambled species [PtPd₂S₂(PPh₃)₅Cl]⁺. In contrast, [PdCl₂(PTA)₂], containing the small PTA ligand gave [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(PPh₃)₄Pd(PTA)₂]²⁺. A survey of the reactions of [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(PPh₃)₄] with platinum(II) and palladium(II) dichloride substrates [L₂MCl₂] has been carried out using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry; the dominant theme is the formation of dicationic species [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(PPh₃)₄ML₂]²⁺, but with some exceptions, which are discussed. The complexes [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(PPh₃)₄Pt(cod)](BF₄)₂ (cod=cyclo-octa-1,5-diene) and [Pt₂(μ-S)₂(PPh₃)₄Pd(bipy)] (PF₆)₂(bipy=2,2′-bipyridine) were characterised by X-ray diffraction studies.

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  • A terrrestrial palynological record for the last two glacial cycles from southwestern New Zealand

    Newnham, Rewi M.; Vandergoes, Marcus J.; Hendy, Chris H.; Lowe, David J.; Preusser, F. (2007-02)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    A pollen profile from Okarito Pakihi Bog in south Westland, New Zealand extending from near present back to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 provides a continuous record of vegetation and climate change for the past two glacial cycles. Independent chronological control was obtained by AMS radiocarbon dating of organic sediments in the upper part of the sequence and OSL dating of inorganic silts in the lower part, with a unique tie point provided by the ca 26.5 cal ka Kawakawa Tephra. As was probably a common occurrence in this region, the basin developed as a moraine-dammed proglacial lake and remained lacustrine until the early Holocene, when a peat bog developed. Survival of the depositional site through subsequent multiple ice advances, unusual in a glaciated landscape, was probably assisted by lateral displacement of the basin relative to its source area, across the Alpine Fault. There is good correspondence between inferred periods of substantial treeline depression in the pollen profile and the record for ice advance in this region. More cooling events are evident in the pollen record, however, presumably due to the fragmentary nature of glacial geomorphology. The pollen record also shows broad consistency with the MIS record and hence with the Milankovitch orbital forcing model, but with some departures, including an early onset to the last glacial maximum (LGM). Several sub-Milankovitch scale events are also evident, including a mid-LGM warming and Lateglacial reversals during both the last and the penultimate deglaciation.

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  • Coulomb-oscillator duality in spaces of constant curvature

    Kalnins, Ernie G.; Miller, W., Jr.; Pogosyan, G.S. (2000-05)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In this paper we construct generalizations to spheres of the well-known Levi-Civita, Kustaanheimo–Steifel, and Hurwitz regularizing transformations in Euclidean spaces of dimensions two, three, and five. The corresponding classical and quantum mechanical analogs of the Kepler–Coulomb problem on these spheres are discussed.

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  • Data mining in bioinformatics using Weka

    Frank, Eibe; Hall, Mark A.; Trigg, Leonard E.; Holmes, Geoffrey; Witten, Ian H. (2004)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The Weka machine learning workbench provides a general purpose environment for automatic classification, regression, clustering and feature selection-common data mining problems in bioinformatics research. It contains an extensive collection of machine learning algorithms and data exploration and the experimental comparison of different machine learning techniques on the same problem. Weka can process data given in the form of a single relational table. Its main objectives are to (a) assist users in extracting useful information from data and (b) enable them to easily identify a suitable algorithm for generating an accurate predictive model from it.

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  • Text mining in a digital library

    Witten, Ian H.; Don, Katherine J.; Dewsnip, Michael; Tablan, Valentin (2004)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Digital library strive to add value to the collections they create and maintain. One way is through selectivity: a carefully chosen set of authoritative documents in a particular topic area is far more useful to those working in the area than a huge, unfocused collection (like the Web). Another is by augmenting the collection with high- quality metadata, which supports activities of searching and browsing in a uniform and useful way. A third way, and our topic here, is to enrich the documents by examining their content, extracting information, and using it to enhance the ways they can be located and presented.

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  • Particle acceleration scalings based on exact analytic models for magnetic reconnection

    Craig, Ian J.D.; Litvinenko, Yuri E. (2002-05)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Observations suggest that particle acceleration in solar flares occurs in the magnetic reconnection region above the flare loops. Theoretical models for particle acceleration by the reconnection electric field, however, employ heuristic configurations for electric and magnetic fields in model current sheets, which are not solutions to the MHD reconnection problem. In the present study, particle acceleration is discussed within the context of a self-consistent MHD reconnection solution. This has the advantage of allowing poorly constrained local parameters in the current sheet region to be expressed in terms of the boundary conditions and electric resistivity of the global solution. The resulting acceleration model leads to energy gains that are consistent with those for high-energy particles in solar flares. The overall self-consistency of the approach is discussed.

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  • Attraction of migratory inanga (galaxias maculatus) and koaro (galaxias brevipinnis) juveniles to adult galaxiid odours

    Baker, Cindy F.; Hicks, Brendan J. (2003)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The response of migratory galaxiid juveniles, inanga (Galaxias maculatus) and koaro (G. brevipinnis), to the odours of adult galaxiids was tested in a two-choice chamber apparatus. Both conspecific and heterospecific odours were tested. Inanga juveniles were attracted to adult inanga (G. maculatus), banded kokopu (G. fasciatus), and koaro (G. brevipinnis) odours. However, they were not attracted to odours from common bullies (Gobiomorphus cotidianus). Koaro juveniles exhibited a species-specific attraction to adult koaro odours only. These results demonstrate inanga uveniles can discriminate and are attracted to adult galaxiids during their migratory phase, whilst migratory koaro juveniles exhibit a species-specific attraction to adult odours similar to the pheromonal attraction previously described for juvenile banded kokopu. This strengthens the hypothesis for the use of pheromonal cues in stream and habitat selection by amphidromous galaxiids.

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  • Microbial biodiversity of thermophilic communities in hot mineral soils of Tramway Ridge, Mount Erebus, Antarctica

    Soo, Rochelle M.; Wood, Susanna A.; Grzymski, Joseph J.; McDonald, Ian R.; Cary, S. Craig (2009)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Tramway Ridge, located near the summit of Mount Erebus in Antarctica, is probably the most remote geothermal soil habitat on Earth. Steam fumaroles maintain moist, hot soil environments creating extreme local physicochemical differentials. In this study a culture-independent approach combining automated rRNA intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA) and a 16S rRNA gene library was used to characterize soil microbial (Bacterial and Archaeal) diversity along intense physicochemical gradients. Statistical analysis of ARISA data showed a clear delineation between bacterial community structure at sites close to fumaroles and all other sites. Temperature and pH were identified as the primary drivers of this demarcation. A clone library constructed from a high-temperature site led to the identification of 18 novel bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs). All 16S rRNA gene sequences were deep branching and distantly (85–93%) related to other environmental clones. Five of the signatures branched with an unknown group between candidate division OP10 and Chloroflexi. Within this clade, sequence similarity was low, suggesting it contains several yet-to-be described bacterial groups. Five archaeal OTUs were obtained and exhibited high levels of sequence similarity (95–97%) with Crenarchaeota sourced from deep-subsurface environments on two distant continents. The novel bacterial assemblage coupled with the unique archaeal affinities reinvigorates the hypotheses that Tramway Ridge organisms are relics of archaic microbial lineages specifically adapted to survive in this harsh environment and that this site may provide a portal to the deep-subsurface biosphere.

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  • The antibacterial activity of honey against coagulase-negative staphylococci

    French, Vanessa; Cooper, Rose A.; Molan, Peter C. (2005)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Development of antibiotic-resistant strains of coagulase-negative staphylococci has complicated the management of infections associated with the use of invasive medical devices, and innovative treatment and prophylactic options are needed. Honey is increasingly being used to treat infected wounds, but little is known about its effectiveness against coagulase-negative staphylococci. The aim of this study was to determine the minimum active dilution of two standardized, representative honeys for 18 clinical isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci.

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