24,394 results for Journal article

  • Current singularities at finitely compressible three-dimensional magnetic null points

    Pontin, D.I.; Craig, Ian J.D. (2005)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The formation of current singularities at line-tied two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D, respectively) magnetic null points in a nonresistive magnetohydrodynamic environment is explored. It is shown that, despite the different separatrix structures of 2D and 3D null points, current singularities may be initiated in a formally equivalent manner. This is true no matter whether the collapse is triggered by flux imbalance within closed, line-tied null points or driven by externally imposed velocity fields in open, incompressible geometries. A Lagrangian numerical code is used to investigate the finite amplitude perturbations that lead to singular current sheets in collapsing 2D and 3D null points. The form of the singular current distribution is analyzed as a function of the spatial anisotropy of the null point, and the effects of finite gas pressure are quantified. It is pointed out that the pressure force, while never stopping the formation of the singularity, significantly alters the morphology of the current distribution as well as dramatically weakening its strength. The impact of these findings on 2D and 3D magnetic reconnection models is discussed.

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  • Managing curriculum change and 'ontological uncertainty' in tertiary education

    Keesing-Styles, Linda; Nash, Simon; Ayres, Robert (2013-11-13)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Curriculum reform at institutional level is a challenging endeavour. Those charged with leading this process will encounter both enthusiasm and multiple obstacles to teacher engagement including the particularly complex issue of confronting existing teacher identities. At Unitec Institute of Technology (Unitec), the ‘Living Curriculum’ initiative focused on whole-of-institution curriculum renewal and, in the process, acknowledged and addressed teacher beliefs and practices that variously supported and contested both the initiative itself and the professional development offerings that accompanied it. The related research project identified factors and processes that unsettle teachers, rendering them ‘insecure’, and strategies that have proven effective in supporting teachers through significant change in conceptions of curriculum, teaching and learning.

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  • Intentionalism, Intentionality and Reporting Beliefs

    Mitrovic, Branko (2009)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The dominant view of twentieth century analytic philosophy has been that all thinking is always in a language; that languages are vehicles of thought. In recent decades, however, the opposite view, that languages merely serve to express language-­‐independent thought-­‐contents or propositions, has been more widely accepted. The debate has a direct equivalent in the philosophy of history: when historians report the beliefs of historical figures, do they report the sentences or propositions that these historical figures believed to be true or false? In this paper I argue in favor of the latter, intentionalist, view. My arguments mostly center on the problems with translations that are likely to arise when a historian reports the beliefs of historical figures who expressed them in languages other than the one in which the historian is writing. In discussing these problems the paper presents an application of John Searle’s theory of intentionality on the philosophy of history. The debate between the view that all thinking is verbal and always in a language and the view that human beings think independently of any language (using their languages merely in order to express their thoughts) has had an extensive history in the philosophy of language for the past hundred years. It also has numerous implications for the philosophy of history, where the problem can be stated in general terms as the question of whether a historian, when reporting the beliefs of historical figures, reports the thought-­‐contents (conceived as independent of the language in which they were articulated) or the sentences that these people believed to be true or false. Among English-­‐speaking historians of philosophy, the latter view was promoted by Arthur Danto, the former by Quentin Skinner and Mark Bevir. Both positions are reflected in specific problems of history-­‐writing, such as, for instance, the question whether and how a historian can report the beliefs of historical figures who articulated them in languages different from the language in which the historian is writing. Both positions also fundamentally rely on the assumption that it is possible and legitimate to provide translations of sentences from one language to another when reporting the beliefs of historical figures; but, as we shall see, they are not on equal footing when it comes to explaining what counts as a legitimate translation. This paper explores the implications that these two views on the role of language in human thinking have for the philosophy of history. It will show that the view that all human thinking is verbal is not compatible with some fundamental and standard practices of history-­‐writing. Thus, the paper can be seen as a contribution to the debate about intentionalism in history-­‐writing. It argues in favor of the intentionalist approach by introducing new arguments derived from the philosophy of language, while at the same time proposing a formulation of the intentionalist position that relies on John Searle’s philosophical elaboration on the concept of intentionality.

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  • Protective socks for people with diabetes: a systematic review and narrative analysis

    Otter, S; Rome, K; Ihaka, B; South, A; Smith, M; Gupta, A; Joseph, F; Heslop, P

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Padded socks to protect the at-risk diabetic foot have been available for a number of years. However, the evidence base to support their use is not well known. We aimed to undertake a systematic review of padded socks for people with diabetes. Additionally, a narrative analysis of knitted stitch structures, yarn and fibres used together with the proposed benefits fibre properties may add to the sock. Assessment of the methodological quality was undertaken using a quality tool to assess non-randomised trials. From the 81 articles identified only seven met the inclusion criteria. The evidence to support to use of padded socks is limited. There is a suggestion these simple-to-use interventions could be of value, particularly in terms of plantar pressure reduction. However, the range of methods used and limited methodological quality limits direct comparison between studies. The socks were generally of a sophisticated design with complex use of knit patterns and yarn content. This systematic review provides limited support for the use of padded socks in the diabetic population to protect vulnerable feet. More high quality studies are needed; including qualitative components of sock wear and sock design, prospective randomized controlled trials and analysis of the cost-effectiveness of protective socks as a non-surgical intervention.

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  • Perceived barriers of New Zealand podiatrists in the management of arthritis

    Lansdowne, N; Brenton-Rule, A; Carroll, M; Rome, K

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background Rheumatic conditions can have a significant impact on the feet and requires effective management. Podiatric involvement in the management of rheumatic conditions has previously been found to be inadequate in a hospital-setting and no study has examined current trends across New Zealand. The aim was to evaluate the perceived barriers of New Zealand podiatrists in the management of rheumatic conditions. Methods A cross-sectional observational design using a web-based survey. The self-administered survey, comprising of thirteen questions, was made available to podiatrists currently practicing in New Zealand. Results Fifty-six podiatrists responded and the results demonstrated poor integration of podiatrists into multidisciplinary teams caring for patients with arthritic conditions in New Zealand. Dedicated clinical sessions were seldom offered (16%) and few podiatrists reported being part of an established multidisciplinary team (16%). A poor uptake of clinical guidelines was reported (27%) with limited use of patient reported outcome measures (39%). The majority of podiatrists expressed an interest in professional development for the podiatric management of arthritic conditions (95%). All surveyed podiatrists (100%) agreed that there should be nationally developed clinical guidelines for foot care relating to arthritis. Conclusions The results suggest that there are barriers in the involvement of podiatrists in the management of people with rheumatic conditions in New Zealand. Future studies may provide an in-depth exploration into these findings to identify and provide solutions to overcome potential barriers.

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  • Journalistic integrity or arbiter of taste? The case study of restaurant critic Peter Calder

    Williamson, D; Goodsir, W; Neill, L; Brown, A

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    In these times of interactive IT it seems that ‘almost anyone’ has the potential to become a restaurant critic. However, with growing public interest in food and dining out, the opinions of dedicated food critics are important because they sidestep the opinions of friends, advertising and marketing, and can convince potential consumers to either participate voluntarily as customers, or avoid a potentially bad dining experience altogether. In light of this, our paper illuminates the critical perspective of Peter Calder, one of New Zealand's most well-known restaurant reviewers. The discussion reveals the style of review adopted by Calder, as well as his raison d’^etre. Because this paper reflects the views and opinions of a single research participant, its generalizability is limited however the research provides a ‘thick description’ of Calder's reviewing strategy. Calder's work is fuelled by journalistic integrity rather than a preoccupation with dining out or the hospitality industry. This makes Calder's perspective unique. This paper distils how Calder creates his narratives that have, over time, led to a loyal readership. This insight adds to our understanding of the importance of restaurant critics, and, within this case study, how critics view themselves.

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  • Panoptic reality : a review of Citizenfour

    Tunnicliffe, Craig (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Movies, and perhaps more importantly documentary movies, need to be separated into good documentaries and important documentaries. Citizenfour would then fall squarely in this second category, and require viewing for its import rather than its simulation. Citizenfour documents the days preceding and during the release of information gained by Edward Snowden, which exposed the depth of surveillance activities conducted by the NSA and other security agencies. Directed by Laura Poitras and reporting by Glenn Greenwald, the film documents the process of information release, the technological capability of the spying agencies, and the person (Snowden) behind the release of this information. ...This film and its subject matter are important. They highlight the reality of information accessibility, the surveillance that is currently occurring, the scope and depth of this activity, and government’s complicity in this activity. Jeremy Bentham described a perfect prison where those who thought they were being watched modified their behaviour accordingly. Snowden, facilitated by Poitras and Greenwald, demonstrates in Citizenfour that this prison has already been built, and is present every time we log on to a computer system. For those involved in social change, a risk is that the threat of observation may change behaviour. This needs to be resisted.

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  • A Report on the Community Development Conference 2015

    Stansfield, John; Masih, Abishhek (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The Community Development Conference 2015 was an effort by the Department of Social Practice at Unitec and Community Development practitioners to bring together practitioners, academics and students to share their knowledge, research and stories about community development. Thirty-­‐five completed feedback forms were received - summary included.

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  • Integrated analysis of gene network in childhood leukemia from microarray and pathway databases

    Chaiboonchoe, Amphun; Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Kulasiri, D.; Salehi-Ashtiani, K.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have been used as therapeutic agents for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) for over 50 years. However, much remains to be understood about the molecular mechanism of GCs actions in ALL subtypes. In this study, we delineate differential responses of ALL subtypes, B- and T-ALL, to GCs treatment at systems level by identifying the differences among biological processes, molecular pathways, and interaction networks that emerge from the action of GCs through the use of a selected number of available bioinformatics methods and tools. We provide biological insight into GC-regulated genes, their related functions, and their networks specific to the ALL subtypes. We show that differentially expressed GC-regulated genes participate in distinct underlying biological processes affected by GCs in B-ALL and T-ALL with little to no overlap. These findings provide the opportunity towards identifying new therapeutic targets. © 2014 Amphun Chaiboonchoe et al.

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  • Suburban interventions : understanding the values of place and belonging through collaboration

    Woodruffe, Paul; Unitec Institute of Technology. The everyday collective laboratory (2012-05-23)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    How can a socially defined project facilitate meaningful knowledge transfer between community, corporate and institution? In order to address this question, this paper focuses on an ongoing live project in suburban Auckland New Zealand begun in 2010, undertaken by a post-graduate student and researcher collective. The collective currently creates subtle interventions sited within local cyberspace, and through this current project will employ impermanent and small-scale design to advocate for a series of neglected and disputed sites. It explores the impact and value the presence of artists and designers working within local communities can have, and “champions the role of the artist in the development of the public realm, and their intuitive response to spaces, places, people and wildlife” (Wood 2009, p.26). The significance of this project is that it promotes a collaborative and multidisciplinary methodology that works with community groups to advocate to corporate entities for a wider social and environmental awareness of specific sites. This paper aims to explain the processes and findings of the project to date through both its successes and failures. It also proposes the possibility of the methodology being transferred to undergraduate and post-graduate study as a tool to promote multi-disciplined collaborate project briefs that focus on community well being ... One of the most important findings from the first project in Memorial Avenue was the fact that the local residents had a complete aversion to what they perceived as a “design” proposition. The notion of a designer coming into their neighbourhood with a plan to place a design into or onto the landscape without their request was unacceptable to them. So the document prepared for the heritage walkway proposal contained nothing that could be called landscape design for construction, and it was vital that no sense of urgency or externally driven timetables were introduced to the process, and that the document was seen as a gift and a celebration of their landscape, culture and heritage instead of a plan and an agenda for development.

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  • Evaluation of parameter uncertainties in nonlinear regression using Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet

    Hu, W.; Xie, J.; Chau, Henry; Si, B. C.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    Background Nonlinear relationships are common in the environmental discipline. Spreadsheet packages such as Microsoft Excel come with an add-on for nonlinear regression, but parameter uncertainty estimates are not yet available. The purpose of this paper is to use Monte Carlo and bootstrap methods to estimate nonlinear parameter uncertainties with a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. As an example, uncertainties of two parameters (α and n) for a soil water retention curve are estimated. Results The fitted parameters generally do not follow a normal distribution. Except for the upper limit of α using the bootstrap method, the lower and upper limits of α and n obtained by these two methods are slightly greater than those obtained using the SigmaPlot software which linearlizes the nonlinear model. Conclusions Since the linearization method is based on the assumption of normal distribution of parameter values, the Monte Carlo and bootstrap methods may be preferred to the linearization method.

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  • Creating a heart politics for community development: the legacy of Whāea Betty Wark

    Connor, Helene (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper provides an overview of the life and community development work of Whāea Betty Wark (1924-­‐2001). Whāea Betty was a Māori woman who was actively involved with community-­‐based organisations from the 1950s until her death in May 2001. She was one of the founders of Arohanui Incorporated, which was initiated in 1976. Its main purpose was to provide accommodation for young homeless people in need. Betty termed her community development work and activism her ‘heart politics’. It was a term that represented her involvement in community grassroots initiatives and the feelings of connectedness she felt with the people and causes she was concerned with.

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  • Kai Conscious Waiheke : a community development approach to food waste reduction

    Jeffery, Dawn A.; Stansfield, John (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Organic waste, particularly food waste, has been identified as a significant hazardous component of the waste to landfill stream. The waste represents an economic loss as well as an environmental pollutant, which is digested anaerobically to release greenhouse gasses. Moreover, the food wasted has an increasing embedded energy component. As well as the energy expended in its production and distribution, wasted food requires further energy for collection and disposal. To date, much of the effort to reduce food waste to landfill focusses on post-­‐waste solutions such as composting. While these recycling efforts are important, they cannot fully address the economic waste and the embedded energy issues. This presentation reports on a novel collaboration between local government and a grassroots community organisation that adapted community development methodology to learnings from an earlier trial. The Waiheke Resources Trust was supported by Auckland Council and the Blackpool community in launching of Kai Conscious Waiheke, a grassroots food waste reduction project. A baseline and post-­‐project Solid Waste Analysis Protocol (SWAP) contributed quantitative results, while a survey and video footage added colour and introduced a range of place-­‐making outcomes, which build social cohesion and waste-­‐reduction identity for the community. The aims of the Kai Conscious Waiheke project were to: 1. Reduce the generation of food waste at a household level on Waiheke Island; 2. Increase uptake of composting activities in households to see a reduction in food waste to landfill from Waiheke Island households; 3. Develop a comprehensive project ‘tool kit’ that other organisations can draw on to run food waste reduction projects in their communities; 4. Experiment further with community development as a methodology for solving municipal problems; and, 5. Connect the community.

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  • Financing community : economic development in New Zealand

    Jeffs, Lindsay (2015-05-01)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Community economic development and social enterprise are growing fast across the globe in both developed and developing countries. They are major components of a new economics arising from the failure of traditional approaches to address the effects of complex and intractable social, economic and environmental problems. This paper examines how community economic development and social enterprise are currently financed in New Zealand. It suggests some alternative approaches and makes recommendations to stakeholders to reduce barriers, promote best practice and improve success factors. The initial discussion uses the findings of a comprehensive research process completed in 2014 by the New Zealand Community Economic Development Trust to understand the New Zealand context for community economic development and social enterprise. The discussion then outlines some alternative social finance approaches used in the UK, Canada, Ireland and Australia, and their potential use in New Zealand if certain barriers are removed and best practice models are used. The final section considers the potential for self-­financing by the not-­‐for-­‐profit sector based on data collected by the author over a two-­‐year period. Recommendations are made on how access to finance by community economic agencies can be improved, and the potentially ‘game changing’ impact of such access. The author of this paper has an extensive background as a practitioner and academic in the community economic development and social enterprise sectors, both within New Zealand and overseas.

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  • Model demonstrates functional purpose of the nasal cycle

    White, DE; Bartley, J; Nates, RJ

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background: Despite the occurrence of the nasal cycle being well documented, the functional purpose of this phenomenon is not well understood. This investigation seeks to better understand the physiological objective of the nasal cycle in terms of airway health through the use of a computational nasal air-conditioning model. Method: A new state-variable heat and water mass transfer model is developed to predict airway surface liquid (ASL) hydration status within each nasal airway. Nasal geometry, based on in-vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data is used to apportion inter-nasal air flow. Results: The results demonstrate that the airway conducting the majority of the airflow also experiences a degree of ASL dehydration, as a consequence of undertaking the bulk of the heat and water mass transfer duties. In contrast, the reduced air conditioning demand within the other airway allows its ASL layer to remain sufficiently hydrated so as to support continuous mucociliary clearance. Conclusions: It is quantitatively demonstrated in this work how the nasal cycle enables the upper airway to accommodate the contrasting roles of air conditioning and the removal of entrapped contaminants through fluctuation in airflow partitioning between each airway.

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  • Potato Crisp moisture determination using NIR data and a Back Propagation Neural Network

    Yee, Nigel; Potgieter, Paul; Liggett, Stephen (2013-06)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Near infrared analysis is a tool used for non-destructive determination of material properties and the potato crisp production sector has been using the technique for determination of moisture content however near infrared spectral models suffer from problems associated with light scatter. Light scatter results from geometric irregularities in the samples geometry and this reduces the accuracy of near infrared calibration models without preprocessing for scatter removal. Quantitative calibration models have benefited from the development of artificial intelligence methods and the neural network is now a popular tool for quantitative calibration model formation. In this paper we compare the performance of a back propagation neural network calibration model using 3 forms of preprocessed data, orthogonal signal correction, standard normal variate and data with no scatter preprocessing prior. The correlation coefficient was used to determine the neural networks methods performance and it was found that a neural network using data with no scatter preprocessing yielded the best results.

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  • Article published on the Culberb Project: Baetsch.

    Woodruffe, Paul; Klasz, Walter; Kotradyova, Veronika (2013-03)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Another of CULBURB's projects, this one in the Viennese suburb of Ottakring, involved building a small hut and commu­nity space from locally collected materials. Led by New Zealand artist Paul Woodruffe, Austrian architect Walter Klasz, and Slovak designer Veronika Kotradyova, Baetsch in tbe City brought the New Zealand tradition of the bach to Austria. Short for "bachelor," the bach is a small holiday or beach house made from repurposed materials. Accord­ing lo Woodruffe, the bach is "defined by what it is not; it is not the everyday, but a sanctuary from the everyday." In Austria, the artists installed their bach-become­ Baetsch in a neighborhood park, building and furnishing it with materials con­tributed by local residents.

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  • Play & Learn: Designing Engaging Educational Games for Children

    Nand, Kalpana; Baghaei, Nilufar; Casey, John (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The use of computer games as common vehicles for education, as opposed to pure entertainment, has gained immense popularity in recent years. In this paper, we investigate the appealing characteristics of engaging computer games for children, and whether embedding these characteristics into an educational tool enhances children’s learning. We present the results of an evaluation study done with 120 primary school children over a period of two weeks. The study used an educational tool to teach children numeracy and embedded the characteristics we discovered in the first part of the research. The effectiveness of the educational tool was measured using a pre-test and a post-test, as well as other indicators such as the frequency and duration of time interacting with the tool. The results showed that the modified version of the tool with our features embedded was more effective in enhancing children’s learning.

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  • On the stochastic modeling and analysis of FxLMS adaptation algorithm

    Ardekani, Iman; Abdulla, Waleed H. (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This study represents a stochastic model for the adaptation process performed on adaptive control systems by the filtered-x least-mean-square (FxLMS) algorithm. The main distinction of this model is that it is derived without using conventional simplifying assumptions regarding the physical plant to be controlled. This model is then used to derive a set of closed-form mathematical expressions for formulating steady-state performance, stability condition and learning rate of the FxLMS adaptation process. These expressions are the most general expressions, which have been proposed so far. It is shown that some previously derived expressions can be obtained from the proposed expressions as special and simplified cases. In addition to computer simulations, different experiments with a real-time control setup confirm the validity of the theoretical findings.

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  • Leadership development for experienced New Zealand principals: Perceptions of effectiveness

    Cardno, Carol; Youngs, Howard (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article presents the perceptions of approximately 300 experienced New Zealand principals who participated in a pilot leadership development initiative funded by the Ministry of Education. The Experienced Principals Development Programme (EPDP) underwent a rigorous evaluation that included formative (mid-point) and summative (end-point) feedback to participants and providers over an 18-month period. As the literature on leadership development indicates, particular issues arise for those who are experienced in their leadership roles and have progressed beyond early career challenges. To sustain and develop experienced principals, leadership development programmes need to be relevant, personalized and unique. The evaluation methodology used in this study employed a mixed methods approach comprising quantitative and qualitative analysis of two major participant surveys and data collected for three case studies via observation of delivery events and focus group interviews with participants. The findings confirm that the programme was highly relevant for the participants because it was responsive to individual needs and learning styles. A highly effective component was the school-based inquiry project which was viewed as a conduit for personal development and school improvement. Overall, the programme provided opportunities for both personal and professional learning.

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