24,445 results for Journal article

  • To the "very Antipodes" : nineteenth century Dominican Sister-teachers in Ireland and New Zealand

    Collins, Jennifer (2013-07-02)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper examines the educational and religious lives of Dominican Sisters in nineteenth-century Ireland and New Zealand. It considers developments in Irish society and culture that shaped the educational mission of Dominican Sisters, as well as some of the challenges facing 10 Sisters who, in 1871, journeyed from Dublin to establish a foundation in Dunedin, New Zealand. Drawing on previously unpublished archival sources, including Sisters’ letters “home” to Ireland, this paper explores ways in which the expectations of the Founder Sisters were initially shaped by “Old World” social and cultural structures and their dependence on their motherhouse in Sion Hill, Dublin. It examines changes in the lives of Sisters as their links with Ireland diminished and they began to reshape their educational mission around a new cultural and religious identity. This paper challenges educational historians to acknowledge the role Catholic sister-teachers played in the formation of national education systems.

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  • Education and training deficits in industrial clusters : Empirical evidence that managers can use to rectify the skills gap in Auckland precinct.

    Du Plessis, Andries; Frederick, Howard; Maritz, Alex (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Tertiary institutions should seek continuous feedback from industries to keep track of the needs of businesses to provide education and training. In designing programmes and upgrading curricula, there are important factors to bear in mind so that programmes "cater" for all levels of learners. The Auckland City Council financed this study, focussing on Auckland's Rosebank Business Precinct (ARBP). Surrounding communities, particularly Maori, Pacific peoples and recent migrants, experience disparities in employment. The target population were 500+ businesses operating on Rosebank Road. A total of 529 businesses were identified. Interviews with 102 companies with a 36-question questionnaire were conducted. Areas were identified and covered in this paper in the ARBP for developing programmes and curricula for tertiary institutions to provide employable students with the right knowledge, skills and attributes to grow and manage existing ventures. In the analysis we point out what education or training is necessary for ARBP to provide greater efficiencies and improvement in profit levels. Recommendations and conclusions are provided.

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  • Images of academic leadership in large New Zealand polytechnics

    Cardno, Carol (2013-05)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    As accountability stakes continue to be raised in all education sectors, leadership as a factor that can have an impact on improved student outcomes is being studied with heightened interest. This study was conducted from 2011 to 2012 in New Zealand's large urban polytechnics with the aim of investigating the nature and expectations of academic leadership. The conceptualisation of academic leadership in the theory base is fraught with both complexity and paradox and is often presented in contradictory terms. The study identifies images of academic leadership practised by directors of an academic front line, by actors in the front line and supporters on the side line. In relation to polytechnic settings it is concluded that new and varied forms of academic leadership are provided by spreading the role that encompasses both leadership and management.

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  • Developing an "ecology of learning" within a school sustainability co-design project with children in New Zealand

    Wake, Sue; Eames, Chris (2013-01-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper analyses the inter-relatedness of layers of involvement, as contributing to learning, within a school sustainability project (the eco-classroom project). This engaged students, staff and community members (including professional practitioners) in an architectural co-design project that resulted, after 4 years, in a built classroom. The paper utilises an “ecology of learning” diagram to indicate layers and show connections, which are evidenced by findings from the project, alongside relevant literature in geographies of architecture and childhood, pedagogies of sustainable learning and children’s participatory and co-design examples. In conclusion, the ecology of learning approach is critiqued and encouragement of more sustainability co-design projects with children is recommended. It is proposed this could lead to improved processes for all participants while promoting authentic and relevant sustainability learning.

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  • Post-Web 2.0 Pedagogy: From Student-Generated Content to International Co-Production Enabled by Mobile Social Media

    Cochrane, Thomas Donald; Antonczak, Laurent; Wagner, Daniel (2013-10)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The advent of web 2.0 has enabled new forms of collaboration centred upon user-generated content, however, mobile social media is enabling a new wave of social collaboration. Mobile devices have disrupted and reinvented traditional media markets and distribution: iTunes, Google Play and Amazon now dominate music industry distribution channels, Twitter has reinvented journalism practice, ebooks and ibooks are disrupting book publishing, while television and movie industry are disrupted by iTunes, Netflix, YouTube, and Vimeo. In this context the authors critique the changes brought about in a case study of film and television higher education from initial explorations of student-generated mobile movie production to subsequent facilitation of international student mobile media co-production teams supported by the development of an international Community of Practice, illustrating new forms of post-web 2.0 pedagogy.

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  • Knowledge transfer, educational change and the history of education : new theoretical frameworks

    Collins, Jennifer; Allender, Tim (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical overview of the field of knowledge transfer and educational change and a discussion of the issues raised in the six papers in this special edition. Design/methodology/approach – A theoretical analysis of the field of knowledge transfer. Findings – The six papers consider issues such as the interplay of ideas between British and Indian educationalists, post-war debates over literacy standards, the use of curriculum materials for the process of citizen formation, the influence of international exchanges in the education of adolescents for citizenship, Vigotsky and the transfer of knowledge across time, space, culture, disciplines and networks, and the way constructions of Chinese identity within history books were shaped by knowledge processes that transcended nation states. Originality/value – This special issue of the History of Education Review engages with new approaches that have become available to historians in the past decade illustrating how they might be applied for the first time to key issues in the history of education across colonial and state borders. It addresses questions about the movement of knowledge across national and cultural boundaries, and examines key problems facing educators in a range of colonial and postcolonial contexts

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  • A pedagogy of biocentric relationality.

    Ritchie, Jenny (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper theorises some implications for pedagogies for ‘sustainabilities’ in the light of the current climate crisis, reflecting particularly upon the work of eco-feminist philosopher, Rosi Braidotti, in order to re-imagine a pedagogy of biocentric relationality. A notion of complex, inter-related sustainabilities is promoted as holding pedagogical promise in response to the ecological and cultural challenges of our times. The discussion then moves to focus on Aotearoa as a site for place-based pedagogies founded in local Indigenous understandings. Lastly, some examples from a recent study within early childhood care and education settings in Aotearoa are employed to illustrate some pedagogical possibilities.

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  • Indigenous onto-epistemologies and pedagogies of care and affect in Aotearoa.

    Ritchie, Jenny (2013)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This article reflects on research conducted in one kindergarten that was part of a wider project focusing on 'caring for ourselves, others and the environment' in early years education in Aotearoa New Zealand. The project drew upon Māori and western theoretical frames. In this article I respond to Bruno Latour's suggestion that we renew our theoretical considerations to make our practice more responsive to 'matters of concern'. The interlinked matters of concern that are the focus of this article are the endangered status of both indigenous peoples' worldviews and of the well-being of the planet. Early childhood teachers during the project introduced Māori (Indigenous) seasonal and healing practices within their daily pedagogies, in some small ways perhaps transcending the ongoing disruption and intergenerational trauma of the history of colonisation. It is argued that indigenous ways of being, knowing, and doing enact an ethic of biocentric relationality which, when applied through early childhood pedagogies, offer a source of hope in this era of anthropogenic climate crisis.

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  • Trust in change managers: the role of affect

    Smollan, RK

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Purpose – The aims of the study are to explore what meanings organizational actors and researchers invest in the term trust, to provide insights from a qualitative perspective of employees’ trust in their supervisors and in organizational management when change occurs, and to highlight the affective components of trust in this context. Design/methodology/approach – A social constructionist platform is used to explore how organizational actors form perceptions of the trustworthiness of managers of change and what emotions result. 24 participants from different organizations and hierarchical positions were interviewed on a variety of change experiences. Findings – Positive and negative emotions were related to trust in the ability, benevolence and integrity of immediate supervisors and more senior change managers. The emotions were more intense for distrust than for trust. Some participants referred to challenges to their own integrity. Perceptions of organizational justice during change were important contributors to the creation and erosion of trust in management. Research limitations/implications – The relevance of propensity to trust and pre-existing levels of trust were not investigated and researching these factors, particularly in longitudinal studies, will provide a clearer picture of emotional responses to the perceived trustworthiness of change managers. Exploring cross-cultural issues in the trustworthiness of change leaders would add depth to the field. Practical implications – Developing trust in management though transparency, other fair practices and a positive organizational culture will help to gain commitment to organizational change. Originality/value – This study adds to the scant literature on qualitative investigations of trust, emotions and organizational change by presenting insights from an analysis of employees’ trust in the ability, benevolence and integrity of their own supervisors and those of more senior management in a range of organizations and types of change.

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  • The Forgotten 60%: bird ecology and management in New Zealand's agricultural landscape.

    Macleod, Catriona; Blackwell, Grant; Moller, Henrik; Innes, John; Powlesland, Ralph (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    Production lands make up 58% of Aotearoa New Zealand’s landcover and contribute greatly not only to the national economy but also to patterns and trends in native and introduced avian biodiversity. However, unlike in native forest and other indigenous habitats, birds in agro-ecosystems have received little attention to date. We argue that this is due to (1) a research focus on understanding the causes of the dramatic decline of New Zealand’s critically endangered, endemic species, (2) an adherence to a ‘preservation for intrinsic value’ over a ‘conservation through sustainable use’ paradigm for environmental management, and (3) a historical view of production landscapes as being devoid of endemic and native species and thus of no conservation value. In countering these attitudes, we suggest that the agricultural matrix may contain more native species than many people believe, and that many introduced bird species are key contributors to the social and environmental performance and resilience of these systems. We draw attention to the context, composition, ecology, and status of native and introduced birds in production landscapes in New Zealand, particularly in the face of ongoing agricultural intensification. We first identify the potential roles of local habitat, landscape composition, and introduced predators in shaping farmland bird communities. We then highlight the potential threats and opportunities for birds posed by ongoing intensification, particularly the influences of habitat modification and simplification, increased ecological subsidies through farm inputs, increased stocking rates and yields, and altered predator–prey interactions. We suggest the landscape is the appropriate spatial scale for research and management, and call for an integrated approach to the investigation of farmland birds that combines ecology, sociology, and agro-ecosystems management, and includes farmers, researchers, regulators, and the wider New Zealand public.

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  • Stoat density, diet and survival compared between alpine grassland and beech forest habitats

    Smith, Des; Wilson, Deborah; Moller, Henrik; Murphy, Elaine; Pickerell, Georgina (2008)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    In New Zealand, alpine grasslands occur above the treeline of beech forest. Historically stoat control paradigms in New Zealand’s montane natural areas have assumed alpine grassland is a marginal habitat that limits dispersal between beech forest stoat populations. We compared the summer-to-autumn (January–April) density, weight, diet and winter survival of stoats between these two habitatsduring years of low beech seedfall. Stoats were live-trapped, marked and released in alpine grassland and low-altitude beech forest in the Borland Valley, Fiordland National Park, during 2003 and 2004, and were caught and euthanased for necropsy in 2005. Stoat density was estimated using spatially explicit capture–recapture (SECR). The proportion of stoats marked in one year but recaptured in the next was used as a measure of ‘observed survival’. Prey remains were identified from scats collected during 2003 and 2004 and stomachs from stoats killed in 2005. Stoat density was similar in both habitats over the two years, about one stoat per square kilometre. Observed survival from 2003–2004 was also similar, but survival from 2004–2005 was higher in alpine grassland than in beech forest. In 2003, male stoats were on average heavier in alpine grassland than in beech forest, although average weights were similar in the other years. Diet differed significantly between the two habitats, with stoats in alpine grasslands eating mainly ground weta (a large invertebrate) (72%) and hares (23%), while stoats in beech forest ate mainly birds (31%) and mice (19%). Collectively these results suggest that alpine grasslands are not a poor quality habitat for stoats. Traditionally it has been thought that stoats cannot survive on invertebrate prey alone. This research demonstrates that stoats relying largely on invertebrate prey can occur at similar densities and with equivalent survival to stoats relying on vertebrate prey.

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  • Supervision for critical thinking: challenges and strategies

    Clear, T

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    An abstract is not available.

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  • Variation in the Yak calpastatin gene (CAST)

    Yang, G.; Zhou, Huitong; Hu, J.; Luo, Y.; Hickford, Jonathan G. H.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    Calpastatin (CAST) is a specific inhibitor of calpain (calcium-dependent cysteine protease). This study investigated the potential for variation in yak (Bos grennies) CAST. PCR-SSCP analysis of exon 6 of yak CAST revealed three unique patterns (named A-C). Sequencing of the amplicons revealed two nucleotide substitutions. One substitution (c.398G/C) would nominally change the amino acid sequence (p.S133T) of yak calpastatin. The variant sequence A which carried c.398C was the most common in the yaks tested (95.1%). This is the first report that found yak CAST is variable, and as in pigs, sheep and cattle, this variation may affect animal production traits.

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  • Sustainable design education: designing virtual online teaching resources for fashion and textiles

    Finn, A; Fraser, K

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    In an environment of economic uncertainty and increasing competition, universities are challenged to find alternate methods of maintaining quality educational outcomes given the rising costs for teaching space. Further, in countries such as Aotearoa New Zealand, geographical isolation from the international research community remains a key issue. The development of virtual learning environments (VLEs) is promoted as a viable solution, particularly methods of narrated lecture slides and video-casting which have the potential to be re-used and offer more flexibility through online delivery. As part of an ongoing teaching and learning research fellowship project at Auckland University of Technology, this paper discusses the specific case of an undergraduate course which was developed using Microsoft™ PowerPoint™ and Screencast-O-Matic. Each approach is analysed in the context of developing and delivering course content via Blackboard Academic Suite ™ in combination with low cost technologies including Skype and YouTube ™. While the freedom to ‘tinker’ with new technologies, particularly in fields of creative practice such as fashion design, provide an opportunity for ‘visionary innovation’ (Finn & Fraser, 2012), the authors identify opportunities and limitations, which warrant consideration for academics who are considering a higher level of engagement with technology to enhance teaching practice.

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  • An association between lifespan and variation in IGF1R in sheep.

    Byun, Seung O.; Forrest, R. H.; Frampton, C. M.; Zhou, Huitong; Hickford, Jonathan G. H.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    Longevity in livestock is a valuable trait. When productive animals live longer fewer replacement animals need to be raised. However, selection for longevity is not commonly the focus of breeding programs as direct selection for long-lived breeding stock is virtually impossible until late in the animal's reproductive life. Additionally the underlying genetic factors or genes associated with longevity are either not known, or not well understood. In humans, there is evidence that insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) is involved in longevity. Polymorphism in the IGF1R gene (IGF1R) has been associated with longevity in a number of species. Recently, 3 alleles of ovine IGF1R were identified, but no analysis of the effect of IGF1R variation on sheep longevity has been reported. In this study, associations between ovine IGF1R variation, longevity and fertility were investigated. PCR-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) was used to type IGF1R variation in 1716 New Zealand sheep belonging to 6 breeds and 36 flocks. Ovine IGF1R C was associated with age when adjusting for flock (present 5.5 ± 0.2 yr, absent 5.0 ± 0.1 yr, P = 0.02). A general linear mixed effects model suggested an association (P = 0.06) between age and genotype, when correcting for flock. Pairwise comparison (least significant difference) of specific genotypes revealed the difference to be between AA (5.0 ± 0.1 yr) and AC (5.6 ± 0.2 yr, P = 0.02). A weak negative Pearson correlation between fertility and longevity traits was observed (r = -0.25, P < 0.01). The finding of an association between variation in IGF1R and lifespan in sheep may be useful in prolonging the lifespan of sheep.

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  • Retinal development and ommin pigment in the cranchiid squid Teuthowenia pellucida (Cephalopoda: Oegopsida)

    Evans, AB; Acosta, ML; Bolstad, K

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    The cranchiid Teuthowenia pellucida, like many deep-sea squid species, possesses large eyes that maximise light sensitivity in a nearly aphotic environment. To assess ontogenetic changes in the visual system, we conducted morphometric and histological analyses of the eyes using specimens from New Zealand collections. While the ratio between eye diameter and mantle length maintained a linear relationship throughout development, histological sections of the retina revealed that the outer photoreceptor layer became proportionally longer as the animal aged, coincident with a habitat shift into deeper, darker ocean strata. Other retinal layers maintained the same absolute thickness as was observed in paralarvae. Granules of the pigment ommin, normally located in the screening layer positioned at the base of the photoreceptors, were also observed at the outer end of the photoreceptor segments throughout the retina in young and mid-sized specimens. Early developmental stages of this species, dwelling in shallow waters, may therefore rely on migratory ommin to help shield photoreceptors from excess light and prevent over-stimulation. The oldest, deeper-dwelling specimens of T. pellucida examined had longer photoreceptors, and little or no migrated ommin was observed; we suggest therefore that short-term adaptive mechanisms for bright light conditions may be used primarily during epipelagic, early life stages in this species.

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  • From STEM to STEAM: strategies for enhancing engineering & technology education

    Connor, AM; Karmokar, S; Whittington, C

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper sets out to challenge the common pedagogies found in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education with a particular focus on engineering. The dominant engineering pedagogy remains “chalk and talk”; despite research evidence that demonstrates its ineffectiveness. Such pedagogical approaches do not embrace the possibilities provided by more student-centric approaches and more active learning. The paper argues that there is a potential confusion in engineering education around the role of active learning approaches, and that the adoption of these approaches may be limited as a result of this confusion, combined with a degree of disciplinary egocentrism. The paper presents examples of design, engineering and technology projects that demonstrate the effectiveness of adopting pedagogies and delivery methods more usually attributed to the liberal arts such as studio based learning. The paper concludes with some suggestions about how best to create a fertile environment from which inquiry based learning can emerge as well as a reflection on whether the only real limitation on cultivating such approaches is the disciplinary egocentrism of traditional engineering educators.

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  • Just transitions and a contested space: Antarctica and the Global South

    Verbitsky, JE

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper suggests that Global South states should prioritize Antarctica as a core trans-national issue because of the potential rewards it offers in terms of opportunities for advancing their common political and development agendas. Global South states are significantly underrepresented in Antarctic Treaty System (ATS) governance. Consequently, they have minimal input into the shaping and direction of ATS decision-making on issues such as Antarctic bio-prospecting, fishing and tourism or, critically, into debates about the role and status of Antarctica in the international system. Nevertheless, Antarctica represents opportunities for Global South states to realize shared cosmopolitan democracy and environmental justice goals. While contemporary media coverage of the southernmost continent has focused on its vital role in global climate change, Antarctica is also important for Global South states because it is a contested, non-sovereign area without a clearly defined status or future (international or global commons, Common Heritage of Mankind, global wilderness?) that could be integral to their future development. The paper advocates the benefits for developing states of participating in Antarctic governance, drawing on theories of cosmopolitan democracy and environmental justice to demonstrate that these can be utilized by Global South states to reinvigorate and move forward international debates about the role, status and future of Antarctica, and provides a central place for Global South states in that future. Additionally, these theories can be practically applied to Global South development goals with respect to issues such as the management of Antarctica, access to sustainable resources and benefit sharing from Antarctic resource extraction.

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  • The Origins of Syrian Nationhood; Histories, Pioneers and Identity [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2013-11)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'The Origins of Syrian Nationhood; Histories, Pioneers and Identity', edited by Adel Beshara,

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  • Al-Andalus Rediscovered: Iberia's New Muslims [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2013-07)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Al-Andalus Rediscovered: Iberia’s New Muslims', by Marvine Howe.

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