25,081 results for Journal article

  • The Muslim conquest of Iberia: medieval Arabic narratives [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2012-10)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'The Muslim conquest of Iberia: medieval Arabic narratives', by Nicola Clarke.

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  • Ibn Khaldun: life and times [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2012-06)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Ibn Khaldun: life and times', by Allen James Fromherz.

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  • Red star over Iraq: Iraqi Communism before Saddam [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2012-03)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Red star over Iraq: Iraqi Communism before Saddam', by Johan Franzén.

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  • Non-Muslims in Muslim majority societies: with focus on the Middle East and Pakistan [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2012-05)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Non-Muslims in Muslim majority societies: with focus on the Middle East and Pakistan', edited by Kajsa Ahlstrand and Göran Gunner.

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  • Islam: a short guide to the faith [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2012-03)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Islam: a short guide to the faith', edited by Roger Allen and Shawkat M. Toorawa.

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  • The Islamic law of war: justifications and regulations [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2012-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'The Islamic law of war: justifications and regulations', by Ahmed Al-Dawoody.

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  • Women, war and hypocrites: studying the Qur'an [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2012-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Women, war and hypocrites: studying the Qur'an', by Robert A. Campbell.

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  • The Muslims of medieval Italy [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2012-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'The Muslims of medieval Italy', by Alex Metcalfe.

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  • Universal dimensions of Islam: studies in comparative religion [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2012-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Universal dimensions of Islam: studies in comparative religion', edited by Patrick Laude.

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  • Islam and contemporary civilization: evolving ideas, transforming relations [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2012-03)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Islam and contemporary civilization: evolving ideas, transforming relations', by Halim Rane.

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  • Time in Early Modern Islam: Calendar, Ceremony, and Chronology in the Safavid, Mughal and Ottoman Empires [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2013-07)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Time in Early Modern Islam: Calendar, Ceremony, and Chronology in the Safavid', Mughal and Ottoman Empires, by Stephen P. Blake.

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  • Islam on the Move: The Tablighi Jama'at in Southeast Asia [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2013-10)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Islam on the Move: The Tablighi Jama’at in Southeast Asia', by Farish A. Noor.

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  • The Role of the Arab-Islamic World in the Rise of the West: Implications for Contemporary Trans-Cultural Relations [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2013-07)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'The Role of the Arab-Islamic World in the Rise of the West: Implications for Contemporary Trans-Cultural Relations', edited by Nayef R. F. Al-Rodhan.

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  • Religious conversions in the Mediterranean world [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2014-06)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'Religious conversions in the Mediterranean world', edited by Nadia Marzouki and Oliver Roy.

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  • The Emergence of Islam in Late Antiquity: Allah and His People [Book Review]

    Drury, Abdullah (2014-06)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book 'The Emergence of Islam in Late Antiquity: Allah and His People', by Aziz Al-Azmch.

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  • Efficient quantile regression for heteroscedastic models

    Jung, Yoonsuh; Lee, Yoonkyung; MacEachern, Steve N, (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Quantile regression (QR) provides estimates of a range of conditional quantiles. This stands in contrast to traditional regression techniques, which focus on a single conditional mean function. Lee et al. [Regularization of case-specific parameters for robustness and efficiency. Statist Sci. 2012;27(3):350–372] proposed efficient QR by rounding the sharp corner of the loss. The main modification generally involves an asymmetric ℓ₂ adjustment of the loss function around zero. We extend the idea of ℓ₂ adjusted QR to linear heterogeneous models. The ℓ₂ adjustment is constructed to diminish as sample size grows. Conditions to retain consistency properties are also provided.

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  • Nitrous oxide fluxes, soil oxygen, and denitrification potential of urine- and non-urine-treated soil under different irrigation frequencies

    Owens, J.; Clough, Timothy J.; Laubach, J.; Hunt, J. E.; Venterea, R. T.; Phillips, R. L.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    © American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI 53711 USA. All rights reserved. Despite increased use of irrigation to improve forage quality and quantity for grazing cattle (Bos taurus, Linnaeus), there is a lack of data that assess how irrigation practices influence nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from urine-affected soils. Irrigation effects on soil oxygen (O2) availability, a primary controller of N2O fluxes, is poorly understood. It was hypothesized that increased irrigation frequency would result in lower N2O emissions by increasing soil moisture and decreasing soil O2 concentrations. This would favor more N2O reduction to dinitrogen (N2). We examined effects of high (3-d) versus low (6-d) irrigation frequency with and without bovine urine addition to pasture. Nitrous oxide fluxes were measured daily for 35 d. Soil O2, temperature, and water content were continuously measured at multiple depths. Inorganic nitrogen, organic carbon, and soil pH were measured at 6-d intervals. Measurements of denitrification enzyme activity with and without acetylene inhibition were used to infer the N2O/(N2O + N2) ratio. The N2O/(N2O + N2) ratio was lower under high- compared with low-frequency irrigation, suggesting greater potential for N2O reduction to N2 with more frequent irrigation. Although N2O fluxes were increased by urine addition, they were not affected by irrigation frequency. Soil O2 decreased temporarily after urine deposition, but O2 dynamics did not explain N2O dynamics. Relative soil gas diffusivity (DP/DO) was a better predictor of N2O fluxes than O2 concentration. On a freedraining soil, increasing irrigation frequency while providing the same total water volume did not enhance N2O emissions under ruminant urine patches in a grazed pasture.

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  • Optimizing land use for the delivery of catchment ecosystem services

    Doody, D.; Withers, P. J. A.; Dils, R. M.; McDowell, Richard; Smith, V.; McElarney, Y. R.; Dunbar, M.; Daly, D.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    © The Ecological Society of America. Despite widespread implementation of best management practices, sustainable farming is neither practical nor possible in certain locations, where protecting water quality and promoting agricultural production are likely to be incompatible. Some strategic prioritization of land-use options and acceptance of continually degraded waterbodies may be required to ensure optimization of multiple ecosystem services in catchments (also known as watersheds or drainage basins). We examine approaches to prioritization and propose catchment buffering capacity as a concept to manage the pressure–impact relationship between land use and aquatic ecosystems. Catchment buffering capacity can be considered as a continuum of biogeochemical, hydrological, and ecological catchment properties that define this relationship. Here, we outline a conceptual framework to assist prioritization: (1) establish a water-quality target, (2) quantify the gap in compliance to achieve the desired target, (3) assess catchment sensitivity to change, and (4) determine the adaptive capacity of catchment communities to reach the target.

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  • Measuring the Health-related Sustainable Development Goals in 188 Countries: A Baseline Analysis From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015

    Feigin, V; GBD 2015 SDG Collaborators

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background In September, 2015, the UN General Assembly established the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs specify 17 universal goals, 169 targets, and 230 indicators leading up to 2030. We provide an analysis of 33 health-related SDG indicators based on the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015). Methods We applied statistical methods to systematically compiled data to estimate the performance of 33 healthrelated SDG indicators for 188 countries from 1990 to 2015. We rescaled each indicator on a scale from 0 (worst observed value between 1990 and 2015) to 100 (best observed). Indices representing all 33 health-related SDG indicators (health-related SDG index), health-related SDG indicators included in the Millennium Development Goals (MDG index), and health-related indicators not included in the MDGs (non-MDG index) were computed as the geometric mean of the rescaled indicators by SDG target. We used spline regressions to examine the relations between the Socio-demographic Index (SDI, a summary measure based on average income per person, educational attainment, and total fertility rate) and each of the health-related SDG indicators and indices. Findings In 2015, the median health-related SDG index was 59∙3 (95% uncertainty interval 56∙8–61∙8) and varied widely by country, ranging from 85∙5 (84∙2–86∙5) in Iceland to 20∙4 (15∙4–24∙9) in Central African Republic. SDI was a good predictor of the health-related SDG index (r²=0∙88) and the MDG index (r²=0∙92), whereas the non-MDG index had a weaker relation with SDI (r²=0∙79). Between 2000 and 2015, the health-related SDG index improved by a median of 7∙9 (IQR 5∙0–10∙4), and gains on the MDG index (a median change of 10∙0 [6∙7–13∙1]) exceeded that of the non- MDG index (a median change of 5∙5 [2∙1–8∙9]). Since 2000, pronounced progress occurred for indicators such as met need with modern contraception, under-5 mortality, and neonatal mortality, as well as the indicator for universal health coverage tracer interventions. Moderate improvements were found for indicators such as HIV and tuberculosis incidence, minimal changes for hepatitis B incidence took place, and childhood overweight considerably worsened. Interpretation GBD provides an independent, comparable avenue for monitoring progress towards the health-related SDGs. Our analysis not only highlights the importance of income, education, and fertility as drivers of health improvement but also emphasises that investments in these areas alone will not be suffi cient. Although considerable progress on the health-related MDG indicators has been made, these gains will need to be sustained and, in many cases, accelerated to achieve the ambitious SDG targets. The minimal improvement in or worsening of health-related indicators beyond the MDGs highlight the need for additional resources to eff ectively address the expanded scope of the health-related SDGs.

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  • Development of the Standards of Reporting of Neurological Disorders (Strond) Checklist: A Guideline for the Reporting of Incidence and Prevalence Studies in Neuroepidemiology

    Bennett, DA; Brayne, C; Feigin, V; Barker-Collo, S; Brainin, M; Davis, D; Gallo, V; Jetté, N; Karch, A; Kurtzke, JF; Lavados, PM; Logroscino, G; Nagel, G; Preux, PM; Rothwell, PM; Svenson, LW

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background: Incidence and prevalence studies of neurologic disorders play an important role in assessing the burden of disease and planning services. However, the assessment of disease estimates is hindered by problems in reporting for such studies. Despite a growth in published reports, existing guidelines relate to analytical rather than descriptive epidemiologic studies. There are also no user-friendly tools (e.g., checklists) available for authors, editors, and peer reviewers to facilitate best practice in reporting of descriptive epidemiologic studies for most neurologic disorders. Objective: The Standards of Reporting of Neurological Disorders (STROND) is a guideline that consists of recommendations and a checklist to facilitate better reporting of published incidence and prevalence studies of neurologic disorders. Methods: A review of previously developed guidance was used to produce a list of items required for incidence and prevalence studies in neurology. A 3-round Delphi technique was used to identify the “basic minimum items” important for reporting, as well as some additional “ideal reporting items.” An e-consultation process was then used in order to gauge opinion by external neuroepidemiologic experts on the appropriateness of the items included in the checklist. Findings: Of 38 candidate items, 15 items and accompanying recommendations were developed along with a user-friendly checklist. Conclusions: The introduction and use of the STROND checklist should lead to more consistent, transparent, and contextualized reporting of descriptive neuroepidemiologic studies resulting in more applicable and comparable findings and ultimately support better health care decisions.

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