24,394 results for Journal article

  • Sing No Sad Songs

    Arnold, S. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Sunlight on water (short story)

    Arnold, S. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Sunlight on the water is an excerpt from a novel in progress: The Eshwell bridge witch project.

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  • Parental bereavement: From grief theory to a creative nonfiction perspective on grieving the death of a young adult child from cancer

    Arnold, S. (2008)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

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  • Gender and health promotion: a feminist perspective

    Yarwood, J. (2002)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Throughout the twentieth century feminist thinking underwent radical change as the women’s movement gained momentum. The social movement of feminism has embraced many guises, from liberal, to Marxist, to the postmodern. However, critical understanding of the experience of women’s oppression has remained the raison d’être of feminist thinking. The relevance of feminist scholarship within the interrelationship of gender and health care will be analysed and debated in this article, through the dominant discourse of health promotion.Throughout the twentieth century feminist thinking underwent radical change as the women’s movement gained momentum. The social movement of feminism has embraced many guises, from liberal, to Marxist, to the postmodern. However, critical understanding of the experience of women’s oppression has remained the raison d’être of feminist thinking. The relevance of feminist scholarship within the interrelationship of gender and health care will be analysed and debated in this article, through the dominant discourse of health promotion.

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  • Outsider influence and the utility of e-mail as an instrument for teaching in developing nations: a case study in Fiji

    Shanahan, M. W. (2006)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The impact of outsider influence in the advancement of human capital in developing nations is well documented1. This paper examines the utility of e-mail as a mechanism for delivery of outsider influence to middle managers in Fiji via a personal management development programme (PMDP). Thirteen participants took part in the PMDP over a six month period. The programme was aimed at enhancing their managerial skills by achievement of a series of negotiated objectives. There was one face-to-face meeting with each participant to set up the programme and negotiate objectives, and a second face-to-face meeting six weeks later to ensure all processes and systems were operational. During the six month duration of the programme, all other correspondence was limited to e-mail only.

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  • Sen's capability approach in designing and implementing poverty reduction programmes: promoting successful local application through focus groups

    Schischka, J. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    At a theoretical level there has been wide acceptance of Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach (CA) in development. However, questions remain regarding operationalization of the approach within the constraints participants and practitioners and other stakeholders face in designing and implementing poverty reduction programmes.

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  • Nurse peer group supervision: sharing the load

    Shaw-Brown, H. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Discusses how peer group supervision can offer support, shared learning and professional development for nurses in management and leadership roles.

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  • Living in stories: Creative nonfiction as an effective genre to write about death and bereavement

    Arnold, S. (2009)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Through the telling of stories and interaction with listener or audience, we give structure to our experience and create order and meaning. Written narrative is, therefore, a medium well suited to exploring the experience of death and bereavement. 'We live in stories, not statistics,' Gilbert says (2002: 223). Parents' stories of their children's deaths serve the same purpose as parents' stories of their living children's ongoing lives. Writing about the death of one's child is a way not only to continue bonds and help other bereaved parents, but also a way to allow the 'wounded storyteller' to give voice to the dead and facilitate catharsis in the teller. Utilising the techniques of creative nonfiction to write such a story, the writer can create a compelling narrative that allows writer and reader to enter 'the space of the story for the other' (Frank 1995: 18). This paper discusses the human affinity with story telling and the reasons the bereaved write their stories. It also defines the genre of creative nonfiction and outlines the history of its development. Finally it examines four creative nonfiction texts that have influenced my own writing on the topic of parental bereavement.

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  • The co-evolution of learning and internationalization strategy in international new ventures

    Pellegrino, J. M.; McNaughton, R.B. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In this paper, we examine the co-evolution of learning and internationalization strategy in international new ventures (INVs). Many researchers have suggested that in contrast to the reliance on experiential knowledge by firms that internationalize incrementally, firms that internationalize rapidly use alternatives such as congenital and vicarious learning. However, few empirical studies explicitly examine how the use of learning processes in INVs evolves. We used retrospective longitudinal analysis to explore the learning processes of four New Zealand-based INVs, and found that their dominant learning mode and foci of learning changed as internationalization increased. Around the time of founding, congenital learning dominated, but as the firms began to internationalize, they relied more on experiential, vicarious, searching and noticing learning processes. The focus of their learning also shifted from product knowledge to knowledge about foreign markets and the internationalization process. In the later stages of their internationalization, experiential learning increased in importance, as did other resource-intensive learning processes such as grafting by acquiring a company overseas. We conclude that the learning processes used by INVs co-evolve with their internationalization, and are more rapid and less systematic than is implied by traditional models of the internationalization process, with substitutes for experiential learning dominating early in the process.

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  • Encouraging students to think strategically when learning to solve linear equations

    Robson, D. E.; Abell, W.; Boustead, T. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Students who are preparing to study science and engineering need to understand equation solving but adult students returning to study can find this difficult. In this paper, the design of an online resource, Equations2go, for helping students learn to solve linear equations is investigated. Students learning to solve equations need to consider their overall strategy as well as the procedures for each step. Students were encouraged to develop strategies for solving equations with interactive software, Equations2go, which allowed students to decide on strategies while the computer carried out the procedures. The results of trials showed that the software helped students solve equations which they could not solve on their own. Some of the students were then able to successfully transfer their learning to solving linear equations with pen and paper.

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  • What influences practice nurses to participate in post-registration education?

    Richardson, A.; Gage, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Introduction: There is a need for educated primary health nurses to develop their practice, educational and career pathways in response to opportunities emerging from the Primary Health Care Strategy (PHCS). This study aimed to explore the opportunities and constraints encountered by practice nurses when participating in post-registration education. Methods: This study used exploratory qualitative design, incorporating focus group interviews with 16 practice nurses employed by Pegasus Health, Christchurch. Qualitative thematic analysis used a general inductive approach. Findings: Seven key themes emerged, including motivation to learn, enablers for learning and challenges to accessing education. Practice nurses also described their changing roles with clients and their vision for practice nursing in the future. Conclusion: This study considered accessibility of post-registration education for practice nurses and the extent to which they are embracing these opportunities in order to meet their practice needs. The PHCS states that primary health care nursing is crucial to its implementation. Successful expansion of primary health care nursing roles rests on the development of educational qualifications and skills, as well as career frameworks. It is envisaged that, with strong leadership and research skills resulting from professional development, practice nurses will be more able to reduce health inequalities. Study findings indicate that practice nurses are rising to the challenge of expanding their roles and engaging in post-registration education. They are more likely to pursue this if constraints are minimised and support increased. Currently practice nurses make significant contributions to primary health care and have the potential for an even greater contribution in the future.

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  • A Māori approach to management: Contrasting traditional and modern Māori management practices in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Mika, J.P.; O'Sullivan, J.G. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This is a conceptual article located in the discourses of indigeneity, post-colonialism and critical management studies in which we seek to renew interest in Māori management as a distinctive form of management within Aotearoa New Zealand. We discuss defining Māori management and Māori organisations and their relevance for today's organsiations in New Zealand and internationally. We examine differences and similarities between Western and Māori management in terms of the four functions of management adapted from principles first proposed by Fayol in 1949. We propose a theoretical model of Māori management and discuss the implications of Māori management for management research, policy and practice.

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  • www.useless.com: Crisis communications on shaky ground

    Vavasour, K (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    After the magnitude 6.3 earthquake that struck the city of Christchurch on February 22, 2011, the physical and communications infrastructure that many city dwellers rely on suddenly ceased to function. For many, this disruption to physical and virtual networks resulted in access to media, information, assistance and family being cut off or restricted in a number of different ways. Survey results show residents of the less-damaged suburbs made more use of television, websites and social media than those in badly damaged areas, who relied more on radio, word-­of-mouth, and print material. Social media and new technologies are now an established part of the crisis communications discourse; however, the infrastructure they rely on is not as solid and reliable as it may appear. After exploring the concept of blackboxing, the failures and weaknesses of previously backgrounded objects exposed by the earthquakes provide examples of its undoing (un-blackboxing). Quantitative and qualitative survey data is used to show how variations in location and disruption impacted on the information-­seeking of residents, and how the un-­blackboxing of infrastructure and socio-­technical networks left residents out of the loop. This research also challenges perceptions of how widely used, accessible and/or useful technologies like Twitter are to those in the middle of a disaster.

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  • Narrative strategies regarding Japanese ethnic origins and cultural identities in Japanese middle-school history textbooks

    Nishino, R. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article examines how middle school history textbooks published between 1951 and 1995 explain the origins of the Japanese as an ethnic group (minzoku). The analysis shows that despite the relatively long period from which the sample of textbooks was taken, these texts continue to emphasize two categories of Japanese identity: a biologically heterogeneous people through prehistoric immigration and a unifi ed language. Building on the latter theme, the textbooks continued to treat the innovation of the kana as a quintessential development underlying the Japanese cultural achievement. The analysis reveals that the narrative tone shifted from being emotive in the early 1950s texts to somewhat muted in later decades.

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  • Microbial carbon concentration in samples of seabird and non-seabirdforest soil: Implications for leaf litter cycling

    Hawke, D.J.; Vallance, J. R. (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The paucity of leaf litter in seabird forest is usually explained by litter burial in burrows, but burial byitself fails to address the processes controlling decomposition. We measured soil microbial C in samplesfrom a Westland petrel (Procellaria westlandica) colony both within and outside the breeding season,and compared the results with two non-seabird forests. From the few studies of seabird soil microbialC, we initially hypothesised a soil microbial C concentration sequence of occupied burrows > unoccupiedburrows > adjacent forest floor > non-seabird forest. Instead, the highest values came from non-seabirdforest, a pattern consistent with published meta-analyses on the effects of N addition. Within the colony,highest concentrations were in forest floor soil and there was no burrow occupation effect. However,seabird forest soil microbial C followed a strong inverse relationship with soil ı13C (r = −0.58; P < 0.001)as well as the expected relationship with total soil C (r = 0.75); the relationship with soil ı13C in non-seabird forest was not significant (P = 0.29). We propose that soil microbes in seabird forest repeatedlyprocess a single pool of increasingly refractory terrestrial soil C, facilitated by seabird guano priming oforganic matter mineralisation. In this context, the paucity of leaf litter in seabird forest can be seen asa consequence of microbial C limitation in a nutrient-saturated system, an explanation consistent withrecent theory.

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  • Impact of increasing capacity for generating and using research on maternal and perinatal health practices in South East Asia (SEA-ORCHID Project)

    The SEA-ORCHID Study Group; Martis, R. (2011)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: Maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity remain unacceptably high in many low and middle income countries. SEA-ORCHID was a five year international collaborative project in South East Asia which aimed to determine whether health care and health outcomes for mothers and babies could be improved by developing capacity for research generation, synthesis and use. Methods: Nine hospitals in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand participated in SEA-ORCHID. These hospitals were supported by researchers from three Australian centres. Health care practices and outcomes were assessed for 1000 women at each hospital both before and after the intervention. The capacity development intervention was tailored to the needs and context of each hospital and delivered over an 18 month period. Main outcomes included adherence to forms of care likely to be beneficial and avoidance of forms of care likely to be ineffective or harmful. Results: We observed substantial variation in clinical practice change between sites. The capacity development intervention had a positive impact on some care practices across all countries, including increased family support during labour and decreased perineal shaving before birth, but in some areas there was no significant change in practice and a few beneficial practices were followed less often. Conclusion: The results of SEA-ORCHID demonstrate that investing in developing capacity for research use, synthesis and generation can lead to improvements in maternal and neonatal health practice and highlight the difficulty of implementing evidence-based practice change.

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  • Isotopic signatures (13C/12C; 15N/14N) of blue penguin burrow soil invertebrates: Carbon sources and trophic relationships

    Hawke, D.; Clark, J. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Seabird burrows provide a soil environment for processing discards such as feathers and guano, hence constituting a primaryinterface between the sea and the land. This studyinvolved collection and culturing of soil invertebrates from three blue penguin (Eudyptula minor) burrows, and examined their 13C/12C and 15N/14N isotopic composition in relation to potential burrow resources (terrestrial plant litter, burrow soil, guano, blue penguin feathers). Two taxa (cerylonid beetles and small tineid moth larvae) had a depleted 13C/12C indicative of a level of dependence on C from terrestrial soil. Tineid moth larvae (Monopis crocicapitella and (or) M. ethelella) substantiallyincreased their 13C/12C enrichment during development, implying increasing dependence on marine C. Remaining taxa, both decomposers and predators, had 13C/12C intermediate between guano and feathers. Larval and emergent fleas had the most enriched 13C/12C, indicative of a greater dependence on feather C and the likelihood of co-processing with guano. Pseudoscorpions and histerid beetles had overlapping isotopic enrichments implying competition for prey, but were spatially separated in burrow soil. With their highly enriched 15N/14N and marine 13C/12C, larvae and protonymphs of the histiostomatid mite Myianoetus antipodus stood alone. Blue penguin burrows therefore support a diverse invertebrate fauna that incorporates terrestrial soil as well as varying proportions of the various blue penguin discards.

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  • Evaluation of human adenovirus and human polyomavirus as indicators of human sewage contamination in the aquatic environment

    Hewitt, J.; Greening, G.E.; Leonard, M.; Lewis, G.D. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Discharge of inadequately treated human wastewater into surface waters used for recreation, drinking water, irrigation and shellfish cultivation may present a public health hazard due to the potential shedding of high concentrations of pathogenic viruses from the human gastrointestinal tract. Human adenovirus (HAdV) and human polyomavirus (HPyV) are ubiquitous in humans and have excellent survival characteristics in the environment, so are potential candidates for indicators of human sewage contamination. Using qPCR assays, the prevalence and quantity of HAdV and HPyV JC and BK were determined in influent and effluent wastewater and receiving waters (river, urban stream, estuarine), then compared with norovirus (NoV) presence, a significant human pathogen which is not necessarily ubiquitously excreted into the environment. HAdV and HPyV were frequently detected in high concentrations in wastewater and wastewater-contaminated waters confirming their use as potential indicators for the presence of human sewage. Overall, there was a correlation between the presence of HAdV and HPyV with NoV but there were some notable exceptions including the higher frequency of NoV compared to HAdV and HPyV in estuarine waters impacted by wastewater overflows. We found that HAdV and HPyV detection by qPCR was a suitable tool for evaluating water quality and that their detection can aid in determining pollution sources, thus providing useful information for health risk assessments.

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  • Learning through apprenticeship: belonging to a workplace, becoming and being

    Chan, S. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The transition from school to work, in the form of a trade-based apprenticeship, is one with a long history. Recent socio-historical changes include increased use of technology, the changing nature of work and shifting patters in the employment market are influencing both the apprenticeship journey and its destination. In this article, the contemporary apprenticeship experience is described and explored using the metaphoric phases consisting of belonging to a workplace, becoming a baker and eventually being a baker. These phases are derived from a longitudinal case study of 13 baking apprentices as they entered bakery work mainly by happenstance and began to belong to the workplace; became bakers through various processes of skill acquisition, knowledge consolidation, dispositional transformation and occupational identity formation; and continued to be bakers, with many attaining a strong sense of vocation and identification with bakers’ occupation. An updated understanding of apprenticeship may inform the development of entry pathways into apprenticeship; improve workplace learning opportunities; and widen the means for recognition and certification of skill/knowledge attainment and dispositional transformation.

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  • Pancreatic stone and treatment using ERCP and ESWL procedures: a case study and review

    Hayes, J.; Ding, S. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Introduction Pancreatic duct stones are found in 22 to 60% of patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP). The stones can lead to obstruction of the outflow of pancreatic secretions causing increased intraductal pressure. The pancreas is relatively noncompliant. Therefore the rise in intraductal pressure can induce tissue hypertension and ischemia. This can be a major factor causing pain in patients with CP. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that symptoms may improve following pancreatic duct drainage. Case presentation: A 62-year-old woman presented with persistent epigastric pain. Investigations revealed calcifications within the main pancreatic duct and head of the gland. Treatment with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) achieved a good outcome. Conclusion: Standard endoscopic removal of the stones proved impossible so treatment with ESWL was undertaken. Following fragmentation, the calculi and fragments passed spontaneously or were removed endoscopically. If pancreatic stones cannot be removed endoscopically, ESWL should be considered prior to surgery.

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