25,592 results for Journal article

  • New erythraeids (Parasitengona) from recent glacial outwash, Southern Alps, New Zealand; Callidosoma, Momorangia, Grandjeanella, and Pukakia gen. nov.; with a description of the deutonymph of Callidosoma tiki

    Clark, J. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Callidosoma susanae sp. nov., Momorangia chambersi sp. nov., Grandjeanella macfarlanei sp. nov. and Pukakia aoraki gen. nov., sp. nov., are described from recent glacial outwash in a braided river bed, Southern Alps, New Zealand. Two species previously placed in Momorangia Southcott, 1972 are removed. Neomomorangia Fain and Santiago-Blay, 1993 stat. nov. from Brazil is given generic status, and a Kenyan species is moved to Charletonia Oudemans, 1910 as Charletonia gabini (Haitlinger 2004b) comb. nov. Grandjeanella emanueli Haitlinger, 2010, Grandjeanella londaensis Haitlinger, 2011 and Callidosoma matsumuratettix Tseng et al. 1976 are left as species inquirendae. Pussardia Southcott, 1961, Harpagella Southcott, 1996 and Pukakia gen. nov. are placed in Abrolophinae, Witte, 1995. New host records are given for Callidosoma tiki Southcott, 1972 and Momorangia jacksoni Southcott, 1972. The deutonymph of Callidosoma tiki is described.

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  • Supporting New Zealand graduate midwives to stay in the profession: An evaluation of the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme

    Dixon,L; Calvert,S; Tumilty, E; Kensington, M; Gray, E; Campbell, N; Lennox, S; Pairman, S (2015)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: the transition from undergraduate midwifery student to working as a confident midwife can be challenging for many newly qualified midwives. Supporting a smooth transition may have a positive impact on the confidence and retention of the new graduates with in the workforce. In New Zealand the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme (MFYP) was introduced in 2007 as a structured programme of support for new graduate midwives for the whole of their first year of practice.The main components of the programme include support during clinical practice, provision of a funded mentor midwife chosen by the new graduate midwife, financial assistance for education and a requirement to undertake aquality assessment and reflection process at the end of the first year. Aim: the aim of this study was to explore the retention of new graduates in midwifery practice following participation in the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme. Method: data was obtained from the register of MFYP participants between the years 2007 and 2010. This data was cross referenced with the Midwifery Council of New Zealand register and work force data for 2012. Findings: between the years 2007 and 2010 there were 441 midwives who graduated from a midwifery pre-registration education programme in New Zealand. Of these 415 participated in the MFYP programme. The majority were of New Zealand European ethnicity with 10% identifying as Māori. The mean age of participants reduced from 36.4 (SD 7.3) in 2007 to 33.4 (SD 8.1) in 2010. The overall retention rate for new graduate midwives who had participated in the MFYP programme was 86.3%, with 358 midwives still pracising in 2012. Conclusion: there is good retention of new graduate midwives within New Zealand and the MFYP programme would appear to support retention.

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  • Analysing group dynamics within the focus group

    Farnsworth, J.; Boon, B. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Focus groups are routinely used as a research tool in a wide variety of settings. Based on recent experience with poverty research, we argue this method needs to be problematized and further rethought. The article draws on focus group studies conducted over seven years to argue that the method routinely excludes a key area of group interaction: group dynamics. Our work underlines how these are central to shaping group participation as well as the themes, absences and forms of reporting in studies. We employ Whitaker and Lieberman’s (1964) focal conflict theory as a methodology to follow the configuration of these dynamics within a group setting. Drawing on this analytic framework, and examples from the study, we argue that an orientation to group relations is essential to expanding the method’s sensitivity as an effective research procedure.

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  • Outdoor learning in Aotearoa New Zealand: Voices past, present, and future

    Cosgriff, M.; Legge, M.; Brown, M.; Boyes, M.; Zink, R.; Irwin, D. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Many of the principles and practices that have influenced outdoor education in Aotearoa New Zealand find their genesis in the United Kingdom and North America. In recent times, many of these foundational assumptions have been called into question. This paper highlights how emerging ‘local’ voices are questioning and reframing how outdoor education is conceptualised and practiced. In large part this is due to a sense of distinctiveness borne from the bicultural foundations that underpin governance and policy-making. This paper explores how outdoor educators are developing pedagogies that acknowledge the particularities of our context, particularly the bicultural foundation of Aotearoa New Zealand. The paper highlights how social and cultural influences shape educational policy and how outdoor educators are responding, both theoretically and practically, to meet the needs of learners in an increasingly diverse society.

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  • Crafting an occupational identity: Learning the precepts of craftsmanship through apprenticeship

    Chan, S. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The term craftsmanship is associated with pre-industrial craft work with inferences to skilled artisanal manufacture of bespoke products. Apprenticeship learning is often perceived to be synonymous with learning craftsmanship. How then is the trait of craftsmanship through attainment of specific artisanal approaches conveyed and learnt through apprenticeship? This article presents and discusses processes imposed on and utilised by apprentices to attain precepts of artisanal approaches. The dispositional and skill elements of craftsmanship are proposed to be adopted through engagement with and development of craft and workplace specific approaches to contend with aspects of Pye’s (1968) conceptualisation of ‘workmanship of risk’ or the article’s proposed term of ‘artisanal approach of risk’.

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  • Applying user interface guidelines to the development of educational software for equation solving

    Robson, D.E.; Abell, W; Boustead, T. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Creating educational software requires a thorough understanding of several key areas: pedagogy, software development and user interface design. This study, which is part of a larger investigation into the impact on learning of educational software for learning equation solving, focuses on user interface design and its relationship to pedagogical principles. User interface features considered include: nature of feedback, screen layout, metaphors, instructions, buttons, and score. This paper is based on trials with real users of educational software at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology and provides practical information for computing students designing user interfaces.

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  • Engaging software engineering students with natural numbers

    Sarkar, A.; Lopez, M. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    According to Kronecker, a famous European mathematician, only natural numbers, i. e. positive integers like 1, 2, and 3… are given by God or belong to nature. All other numbers, like negative numbers, fractional numbers, irrational numbers, complex numbers, etc. , are creations of the human mind. It is important to notice that all these other numbers are created using the natural numbers. Natural numbers have very interesting patterns and those patterns are elegantly simple and hence simply beautiful. The idea of this paper is to explore different patterns that are created with natural numbers, to demystify the connection of the natural numbers with nature, and then to use them to teach important concepts of software engineering. We will take various examples, discuss the teaching methodology used to teach them, and uncover different software engineering concepts and best practices. The examples that we will use are the Fibonacci sequence and other natural number patterns, and we will connect them with software engineering concepts like loop patterns, recursion, refactoring and decomposition. For the last few years we have used this in our software engineering classes with much success, particularly in relation to student engagement and helping students to think creatively. We are confident that this type of teaching approach can be seamlessly integrated in tertiary as well as in high school software engineering curricula and has no geographical boundaries. This novel teaching approach is ready to be tested in different cultural settings. Finally, we conclude the paper with a desire for future research in cross-cultural, multi-institutional and multi-national settings.

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  • Work-life balance: What Generation Y nurses want

    Jamieson. I.; Kirk, R.; Andrew, C. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    During 2009/2010, a nationwide online survey was undertaken with 358 Generation Y (Gen Y) New Zealand registered nurses to elicit their views about nursing, work, and career.1 The 358 nurses were mostly female (94%), New Zealand European (74.2%), with a mean age of 25 years. The majority (54%) had worked as a registered nurse for less than 1 year, whereas others (36%) had worked between 1 and 4 years. A minority (10%) had worked between 5 and 8 years. This article reports on a small section of the survey related to the Gen Y nurses' views about the notion of a work-life balance. Gen Ys were defined as those born between 1980 and 1994.

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  • High-intensity activity profiles of elite soccer players at different performance levels

    Bradley, P. S.; Di Mascio, M.; Peart, D.; Olsen, P.; Sheldon, B. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The aims of the study were to (a) determine the high-intensity activity patterns of soccer players at different performance levels and playing positions, (b) investigate temporary and end game fatigue in elite domestic and international soccer matches, and (c) quantify acceleration and maximal running speed profiles of elite soccer players. Elite domestic (n = 100) and international (n = 10) soccer players were analyzed using a multicamera computerized tracking system. No differences were found for high-intensity running distance (2,520 ± 678 vs. 2,745 ± 332 m), mean recovery time (67 ± 15 vs. 71 ± 26 seconds), or maximal running speed (7.76 ± 0.31 vs. 7.66 ± 0.34 m·s−1). The distance covered in high-intensity running irrespective of playing level was 18% lower (p < 0.05) in the last than in the first 15-minute period of the game (391 ± 117 vs. 478 ± 141 m). The decline in high-intensity running immediately after the most intense 5-minute period was similar between international (222 ± 33 vs. 109 ± 37 m or 51% decline) and elite domestic (243 ± 81 vs. 114 ± 51 m or 53% decline) players. Wide midfielders, central midfielders, fullbacks, and attackers covered a greater (p < 0.01) distance in high-intensity running than central defenders (3,243 ± 625, 2,949 ± 435, 2,806 ± 408, 2,618 ± 745 vs. 2,034 ± 284 m). Results demonstrate that high-intensity running is reduced during various periods of elite soccer matches, and high-intensity activity profiles and fatigue patterns are similar between international and elite domestic players but vary markedly between playing positions. These data provide valuable information to the fitness coach regarding the high-intensity active profile of elite soccer players that could be used to develop soccer-specific training drills.

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  • A time motion analysis of bouldering style competitive rock climbing

    White, D. J.; Olsen, P. D. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Limited research has been performed on competitive bouldering. The aim of this study was to quantify the movement dynamics of elite boulder climbers. Six climbers were filmed during a national competition consisting of 5 novel climbing problems or routes. Two problems were randomly selected and film footage was analyzed using Kandle Swinger Pro software to determine type and duration (seconds) of bouldering movements. All subjects provided consent, and the study had ethical approval. The mean ± SD were determined for number of attempts per problem, duration of attempt, time on hold, and time to reach between holds. Exercise:recovery ratios were also calculated. On average, climbers attempted a problem 3.0 ± 0.5 times, with an attempt lasting 28.9 ± 10.8 seconds and rest periods of 114 ± 31 seconds between attempts. Average time gripping holds was 7.9 ± 1.3 seconds, with approximately 0.5 ± 0.1 seconds recovery between reaching for holds. The exercise-to-recovery ratio was ∼1:4 for attempting a problem and ∼13:1 for forearm muscles during climbing. The exercise-to-recovery ratios allow sufficient time for recovery during and after a problem. However, the prolonged contraction of forearm muscles indicates the importance of strength and endurance in these muscles. Video analysis was found to be a useful tool for the quantification of movement characteristics of competitive elite boulders. Data collected could be utilized in the design of sport-specific tests and training programs. Future research could examine a larger number of athletes and problems and help develop performance tests and training interventions for bouldering.

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  • Product development: An integrative tool and activity research framework

    de Waal, A.; Knott, P. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The paper addresses research issues in new product development (NPD) activity, practices and tools, in particular the need to integrate the set of tools practitioners use with the praxis of how they use these tools in day-to-day activity. It draws on the strategy-as-practice literature to derive a model that integrates the concepts of NPD practices, practitioners an praxis. It then draws on a systematic review and synthesis of existing NPD literature to develop a generic multi-stage, 12-perspective organizing framework for NPD activity, and provides examples from the literature of twelve corresponding classes of NPD tools. The literature currently lacks such a framework and hence uses indivdually defined schemes, resulting in a fragmented and incomplete picture. We have designed our generic framework so that it can both integrate existing findings and stimulate research that overcomes this fragmentation. We use the framework and our model of NPD practitioners, practices and project execution to articulate a comprehensive set of research challenges in NPD took adoption and use. Our 12-perspective framework could also provide a basis for practitioners to develop or redesign NPD processes for specific situations and purposes.

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  • The ethnography of mobile worlds? Following the case of global poker

    Farnsworth, J.; Austrin, T. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This article relates the current transformation of ethnographic practice to the emergence of new media technologies. It contrasts multi-sited ethnography with actor network theory’s method of following the construction of new media worlds through chains of mediators. The authors exemplify this through the extraordinary emergence of global poker and its shifting constitution across the entire spectrum of traditional and new media technologies. They argue that poker vividly illustrates how following makes sense of these emergent new worlds while at the same time it is an excellent vehicle for problematizing key issues of ethnographic practice.

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  • Determination of maximal oxygen uptake using the Bruce or a novel athlete‐led protocol in a mixed population

    Hamlin, M.J.; Draper, N.; Blackwell, G.; Shearman, J.P.; Kimber, N (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Treadmill tests for maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) have traditionally used set speed and incline increments regardless of participants training or exercise background. The aim of this study was to determine the validity of a novel athlete‐led protocol for determining maximal aerobic fitness in adults. Twenty‐nine participants (21 male, 8 female, age 29.8 ± 9.5 y, BMI 24.4 ± 3.1, mean ± SD) from a variety of exercise backgrounds were asked to complete two maximal treadmill running tests (using the standard Bruce or a novel athlete‐led protocol [ALP]) to volitional failure in a counter‐balanced randomised cross‐over trial one week apart. We found no substantial difference in maximal oxygen uptake (47.0 ± 9.1 and 46.8 ± 10.7 ml.kg‐1.min‐1, mean ± SD for the ALP and Bruce protocols respectively), evidenced by the Spearman correlation coefficient of 0.93 (90% confidence limits, 0.88‐0.96). However, compared to the Bruce protocol, participants completing the ALP protocol attained a substantially higher maximal heart rate (ALP = 182.8 ± 10.5, Bruce = 179.7 ± 8.7 beats.min‐1). Additionally, using the Bruce protocol took a longer period of time (23.2 ± 17.0 s) compared to the ALP protocol. It seems that using either treadmill protocol will give you similar maximal oxygen uptake results. We suggest the ALP protocol which is simpler, quicker and probably better at achieving maximal heart rates is a useful alternative to the traditional Bruce protocol.

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  • The on-going psychological toll from the Canterbury earthquakes: Stories from one community

    Gawith, E. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to capture the stories of earthquake experiences from one community and relate this material to some of the psychological phases of recovery from a disaster. Design/methodology/approach – The approach taken was qualitative, explorative and participatory. The researchers were partners in the school project, as the school determined its own methodology, participation and end result. The audio or video interviews were open-ended and explored broad themes, in groups and individuals. Participants included multiple members of the same families. The stories of the participants were used to illustrate the psychological phases of recovery. Findings – The experiences of the research participants were reviewed through the psychological phases of recovery highlighted in the literature (e.g. Myers and Zunin, 2000). The phases identified in the stories indicate that the Christchurch situation is consistent with international experience. Additional psychological responses such as community bonding and resilience, as well as living with secondary stressors, were also identified. Research limitations/implications – There are some commonalities apparent for this group of interviewees, for example, many were together at the school, at the time of the 22 February 2011 earthquake. However, there are also many differences and unique experiences and as such, only tentative generalisations can be made from these interviews. Originality/value – The paper contributes to the wider collection of research on and about the Canterbury earthquakes by discussing elements of psychological recovery through the experiences of one community of parents, teachers and primary school children.

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  • Building capacity for evidence generation, synthesis and implementation to improve the care of mothers and babies in South East Asia: methods and design of the SEA-ORCHID Project using a logical framework approach

    McDonald, S.; Turner, T.; Martis, R. (2010)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Background: Rates of maternal and perinatal mortality remain high in developing countries despite the existence of effective interventions. Efforts to strengthen evidence-based approaches to improve health in these settings are partly hindered by restricted access to the best available evidence, limited training in evidence-based practice and concerns about the relevance of existing evidence. South East Asia - Optimising Reproductive and Child Health in Developing Countries (SEA-ORCHID) was a five-year project that aimed to determine whether a multifaceted intervention designed to strengthen the capacity for research synthesis, evidence-based care and knowledge implementation improved clinical practice and led to better health outcomes for mothers and babies. This paper describes the development and design of the SEA-ORCHID intervention plan using a logical framework approach. Methods: SEA-ORCHID used a before-and-after design to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted tailored intervention at nine sites across Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines and Indonesia, supported by three centres in Australia. We used a logical framework approach to systematically prepare and summarise the project plan in a clear and logical way. The development and design of the SEA-ORCHID project was based around the three components of a logical framework (problem analysis, project plan and evaluation strategy). Results: The SEA-ORCHID logical framework defined the project's goal and purpose (To improve the health of mothers and babies in South East Asia and To improve clinical practice in reproductive health in South East Asia), and outlined a series of project objectives and activities designed to achieve these. The logical framework also established outcome and process measures appropriate to each level of the project plan, and guided project work in each of the participating countries and hospitals. Conclusions: Development of a logical framework in the SEA-ORCHID project enabled a reasoned, logical approach to the project design that ensured the project activities would achieve the desired outcomes and that the evaluation plan would assess both the process and outcome of the project. The logical framework was also valuable over the course of the project to facilitate communication, assess progress and build a shared understanding of the project activities, purpose and goal.

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  • That's different! How consumers respond to retail website change

    Ainsworth, J.; Ballantine, P.W. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Change is an inevitability faced by retail managers with regard to their online presence, yet the impact of retail website change on consumers remains unknown. In this study, two types of retail website change are distinguished – task-relevant and non-task-relevant – and their impact on consumer emotion is examined. Results from an online experiment suggest that consumers’ perceptions of both types of change have distinct impacts on their emotional responses, although the effects differ between the types of change. Moreover, previous experience with the website is shown to have a key moderating role in the response to change.

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  • Proximal participation: a pathway into work

    Chan, S. (2013)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    In a longitudinal case study of apprentices, the term proximal participation was coined to describe the entry process of young people, with unclear career destinations, into the trade of baking. This article unravels the significance of proximal participation in the decision-making processes of young people who enter a trade through initial engagement in ancillary work roles. These ancillary jobs could be generically applied to a range of hospitality related trades. However, proximal participation provided the research participants with the opportunity to preview a specific trade not as ‘legitimate peripheral participants’ but as participants who were employed in the same workplace doing work that was a support role to the actual trade/craft practice community. Therefore, an exploration of proximal participation may contribute to a wide range of vocational and professional occupations whereby proximal participants migrate to ‘legitimate peripheral participation’ after initial proximal interaction.

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  • Using feedback strategies to improve peer-learning in welding

    Chan, S.; Leijten, F. (2012)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Due to safety considerations, students' practice and learning of welding is conducted within individual welding booths. The booth setting presents some challenges to student learning as collaborative learning within a workshop learning environment is compromised. The project reported in this paper, established peer-learning (i.e., students learning from each other) as an opportunity to enhance student learning. Techniques for effective feedback were presented to students as a means of compensating for reported disadvantages of novices' peer learning. Therefore, this article provides results from introducing peer-learning with relevant feedback techniques, to improve learning outcomes for welding students. This is a practical evidence-based study, reporting findings that are generalisable to the learning of other trade-based disciplines. The feedback strategies proposed are not difficult to introduce to learners and teachers but lead to improved student engagement, improved student meta-cognition and enhanced skill practice and learning.

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  • Effects of bioelectrical impedance-derived fat and lean mass on fitness levels in 8- to 13-year-old children

    Hamlin, M.J.; Fraser, M.; Lizamore, C.A.; Draper, N.; Blackwell, G.; Shearman, J. (2014)

    Journal article
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Childhood obesity prevalence is continuing to rise in developed countries, including New Zealand. The effect of increased adiposity on childrens fitness is relatively unresearched, particularly when using methods other than BMI or skinfold thickness to estimate body fatness. The purpose of the study was to examine the association between fitness and bioelectrical impedance-derived body composition in children. Participants (n = 54) performed a treadmill run to exhaustion, a countermovement vertical jump, and 10m sprint test within 2 weeks of each other. Lean and fat mass were estimated via bioelectrical impedance (MF-BIA2; InBody 230, Biospace, Seoul, Korea). Pearson correlations showed that in females, higher fat mass percentage was associated with lower countermovement jump (r = -0.57), longer 10m sprint time (0.51) and a lower VO2peak performance (-0.48). In boys, higher fat mass percentage was associated with lower VO2peak (-0.36). In both boys and girls lean mass percentage was highly correlated with improved performance in all fitness tests (r = 0.40-0.70). We conclude that lean mass in all cases has a beneficial effect on performance, whereas fat mass tends to be detrimental to girls performance and is likely to be detrimental (VO2peak) or possibly beneficial (countermovement jump) in boys physical performance.

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  • A cost-benefit analysis for using the internet in the language classroom

    Reinders, Hayo (2003)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    In recent years, the Internet has obtained its place in the educational environment. As part of the examination requirements, students have to be able to use the Internet to find information and to gain experience with international communication, for example by using email. Investments in both time and money for this purpose are large, while the results are often hard to measure. Sometimes, computer literacy seems to be the only result of using computers in the classroom, the development of which may be a laudable goal, but is certainly not the responsibility of a language teacher. Using the Internet for language teaching purposes can of course provide benefits, but whether they balance the investments remains to be seen. To aid in this process the author developed a short quizz consisting of a number of questions, the answers to which determine whether the necessary investment to using a particular site is worth it. A ‘scorecard’ makes this easy.

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