4,185 results for Report

  • Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks of New Zealand: A reference volume of lithology, age and paleoenvironments with maps (PMAPs) and database.

    Kamp, Peter J.J.; Vincent, Kirsty A.; Tayler, Michael J.S. (2015)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This volume presents descriptive geological data and text about each Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic geological unit to formation and member level (in some cases) exposed on land in New Zealand, including their lithology, stratigraphic age and inferred environment of deposition or emplacement. These data are illustrated as two types of PMAPS: a present-day paleoenvironment map of New Zealand; and as restored paleoenvironment maps, one for each million years from 65 Ma to the present. These information and data underpin the development of a new Cenozoic paleogeographical model of New Zealand.

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  • The Computation of Key Properties of Markov Chains via Perturbations

    Hunter, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Computational procedures for the stationary probability distribution, the group inverse of the Markovian kernel and the mean first passage times of a finite irreducible Markov chain, are developed using perturbations. The derivation of these expressions involves the solution of systems of linear equations and, structurally, inevitably the inverses of matrices. By using a perturbation technique, starting from a simple base where no such derivations are formally required, we update a sequence of matrices, formed by linking the solution procedures via generalized matrix inverses and utilising matrix and vector multiplications. Four different algorithms are given, some modifications are discussed, and numerical comparisons made using a test example. The derivations are based upon the ideas outlined in Hunter, J.J., “The computation of stationary distributions of Markov chains through perturbations”, Journal of Applied Mathematics and Stochastic Analysis, 4, 29-46, (1991).

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  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

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  • Why the Kemeny Time is Constant

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    We present a new fundamental intuition for why the Kemeny feature of a Markov chain is a constant. This new perspective has interesting further implications.

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  • Leading in Collaborative, Complex Education Systems

    Gilbert, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • On the Edge: Shifting Teachers’ Paradigms for the Future

    Gilbert, J; Bull, A

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This project was designed to explore the conditions needed for New Zealand teachers to experience the transformational learning we argue is needed for future-oriented schooling. Its focus was teachers’ thinking. The research looked at how a group of teachers’ thinking changed as they participated in a professional learning and development (PLD) programme. This PLD had two parts: a university course on educational futures, and a workshop designed to support cognitive growth.

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  • Evaluating a Shared Spaces Intervention. A Case Study of Street Users in Auckland, New Zealand

    Oliver, M; Badland, HM; Duncan, S; Wooller, L; Wright, R; Miner-Williams, W

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    The environmental qualities of urban spaces have the potential to influence peoples’ behaviours, including mode of transport and physical activity patterns, shopper spending habits, and social engagement and behavioural characteristics. Increasingly, urban planners and transport engineers are integrating concepts such as self -­‐ explaining roads and shared spaces into environmental design approaches, for improved driver behaviour, pedestrian safety, and health behaviours. Despite this, research focusing on the effects of such interventions is limited, largely due to the substantial expense of implementing built environment infrastructure, and a general disconnect between researchers and regulatory bodies responsible for intervention implementation. Greater focu s needs to be on understanding the effects these interventions can have on the general population, to inform future infrastructural initiatives and investment. This study compares the profiles and perceptions of street users immediately post and sixteen mo nths after a major streetscape upgrade to a shared spaces mode in the the Fort Street precinct (central business district), in Auckland, New Zealand. A convenience sample strategy was employed for data collection and participants completed in -­‐ person survey s . Descriptive data treatment and inferential statistical analyses were undertaken to compare user profiles and opinions pre and post streetscape upgrades. In total , 373 street users in the Fort Street precinct participated in this research. Overall, findi ngs indicate positive perceptions of the Fort Street upgrades and positive impacts on health -­‐ related behaviours. Recommendations for further improvements to the area predominantly focused on improving pedestrian safety, including reducing traffic speeds, r educing car usage of the area, and providing better clarity on appropriate driver behaviours.

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  • Networks of support for Māori mental health: The response and recovery of Tangata Whaiora through the Ōtautahi earthquakes

    Lambert, Simon J.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report presents the experiences of Tangata Whaiora (Mental health clients) through the disastrous earthquakes that struck Otautahi/Christchurch in 2010-11. It further analysis these experience to how show the social networks these individuals, their whānau, supporting staff respond and recover to a significant urban disaster. The disaster challenged the mental health of those individuals who are impacted and the operations of organisations and networks that support and care for the mentally ill. How individuals and their families navigate a post-disaster landscape provides an unfortunate but unique opportunity to analyse how these support networks respond to severe disruption. Tangata Whaiora possess experiences of micro-scale personal and family disasters and were not necessarily shocked by the loss of normality in Ōtautahi as a result of the earthquakes. The organic provision of clear leadership, outstanding commitment by staff, and ongoing personal and institutional dedication in the very trying circumstances of working in a post-disaster landscape all contributed to Te Awa o te Ora’s notable response to the disaster.

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  • New Zealanders with Disabilities and their Internet Use

    Smith, P

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report presents the findings from a series of interviews conducted with New Zealanders with disabilities who talked about their experiences of Internet use. For people with disabilities in New Zealand, living in the digital age has much wider implications when it comes to their access and accessibility. This report presents the findings from interviews conducted with 11 New Zealanders with a range of disabilities about their Internet use. A description of the study design is outlined in Section One, followed by the presentation of the findings of the research in Section Two. These findings look at firstly, how the participants engage in certain strategies to enable their Internet use in relation to their disability or impairment; secondly, the various online activities they like to participate in; thirdly, the range of barriers they have encountered in their Internet use; and, fourthly, participants’ attitudes towards the Internet and how it has impacted on their lives in terms of technology and independence, identity and socialisation. The conclusion in Section Three reflects upon the findings of the research, offers recommendations and makes suggestions for future research

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  • News, Politics and Diversity in the 2014 New Zealand General Election

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Challenges and Recommendations for the Design and Conduct of Global Software Engineering Courses: A Systematic Review

    Beecham, S; Clear, T; Barr, J; Noll, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This SLR we are conducting traverses the many options available to Computer Science (CS) educators teaching CS courses involving global collaboration. The challenges and solutions in conducting global software engineering courses will be addressed. While there is a rich source of literature covering this topic, there is limited consolidated guidance available for CS educators wishing to implement a global course, in collaboration with other institutions. So building upon the existing knowledge in the literature in the area will help to produce a report that will serve as a broad ranging resource for global software engineering educators. The SLR focusses on two areas: 1. Learning GSE Theory: Developing courses based on GSE theory. I.e. How to teach students about developing software across multi-site teams (to include things like cultural training – i.e. how to build trust amongst a team that hasn’t met face to face, etc.). AND 2. Learning GSE by doing: Developing courses that show how to apply GSE methods in the classroom. E.g. where students develop software in multi-site teams (where the software developed is not really the focus, but ‘how’ to develop the software is what we would be looking at). We also include studies that take a hybrid approach by including a combination of theory and practice. I.e. research that presents experiences of running hybrid courses aimed at developing student capabilities in working as global professionals which have varying degrees of cross-site collaboration, and theorypractice balance.

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  • Fishing activity in the Waikato and Waipa rivers

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Allan, Dave G.; Kilgour, Jonathan T.; Watene-Rawiri, Erina M.; Stichbury, Glen; Walsh, Cameron (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this research project is to collate information regarding the recent use of fisheries resources in the Waikato River and Waipa River catchment areas. In particular, the project sought to summarise the commercial, customary, and recreational fishing activity in the catchments of the Waikato and Waipa rivers in the spatial context of recently introduced co-governance areas. These fisheries include, but are not exclusive to, the broad range of aquatic life managed under the Fisheries Act 1996. Such information is required to support management which includes a co-management framework. The research describes the commercial, customary and recreational fisheries including species and quantities taken, fishing methods, and seasonal influences.

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  • Barrett Bush management plan

    Bryan, Catherine Louise (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The current vegetation pattern of Barrett Bush is the result of complex landscape changes of both recent and historic times. The most recent natural landscape changes occurred as the Waikato River meandered across the region, changing course over many years and depositing the alluvial plain that Barrett Bush grows on. More recent landscape changes have been the result of human activity as vegetation clearance and agricultural development has occurred throughout the district. Fortunately, Barrett Bush was set aside and the reserve now provides insight into original vegetation patterns as well as a refuge for biota characteristic of forests dominated by kahikatea. Barrett Bush sits a shallow depression of an alluvial plain with a podocarp vegetation composition that is classed as a kahikatea semi-swamp forest (Clarkson et al. 2007). Clarkson et al. (2007) describe the typical natural vegetation of kahikatea semi-swamp forest: “Semi-swamp forest dominated by kahikatea grew on the poorly drained shallow depressions. Several other species were present in varying amounts, including rimu, matai, pukatea, swamp maire, tawa, pokaka, and occasional cabbage tree. Prominent in the understorey were silver fern, mapou, hangehange, Coprosma areolata, and turepo, and sedges including Hymenophyllum demissum, hen and chicken fern, Astelia fragrans, A. grandis, and Microlaena avenacea.”

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  • Lake Rotokakahi water quality update 1990-2011

    Butterworth, Joseph (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Rotokakahi is an Iwi-owned lake administered by the Lake Rotokakahi Board of Control on Behalf of lake owners who are descendants from the Ngāti Tumatawera and Tūhourangi hapū of Te Arawa. It is mesotrophic (moderate water quality) lake with an area of 4.4 km² comprised of exotic forestry (57.1%), pasture (26.3%) and regenerating indigenous forest/scrub (16.6%).

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  • Life-history of Lake Horowhenua common smelt: analysis of otolith chemistry and vertebral counts

    Tana, Raymond; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Horowhenua is a coastal eutrophic lake on the west coast of the North Island. A recent survey of the lake found lower than expected fish diversity but comparatively abundant native fish populations, comprising mostly shortfin and longfin eels (Anguilla australis and A. dieffenbachii). A weir on the outlet of the lake was ifentified as a potential barrier to fish migrations, reducing fish diversity and abundance in the lake. However, large numbers of common smelt (Retropinna retropinna) were collected during this survey, indicating that the population was eighter successfully reproducing in the lake or diadromous, i.e., migrating from the sea. Previous studies have shown that lacustrine common smelt can be distinguished from diadromous populations by differences in counts of vertebrae and gill rakers, and otolith microchemistry. Horizons Regional Council requested that an analysis of smelt otoliths and relevant morphological characteristics be performed to ascertain if the Lake Horowhenua population was diadromous.

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  • Assessment of fish populations in Lake Horowhenua, Levin

    Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Horowhenua (Waipunahau) is of substantial historical, cultural and recreational value to the people of the Horowhenua region. However, water quality and biodiversity within the lake has been in decline for a number of years. As part of lake restoration efforts by Horizons Regional Council and the Lake Horowhenua Trustees, a survey of fish species in Lake Horowhenua was conducted by the University of Waikato using boat electrofishing and fyke netting. A lake restoration plan had previously identified invasive fish species such as koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) and European perch (Perca fluviatilis) as being potential barriers to rehabilitation of the lake. The purpose of this survey was to determine the abundance and diversity of fish species within the lake and to ascertain if pest fish species were present at biomasses high enough to be negatively impacting on lake ecology. Recommendations would then be made as to the potential methods and necessity for pest fish removal.

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  • Fish biomass and gonad development in the Rotopiko (Serpentine) lakes.

    Wu, Nicholas; Daniel, Adam Joshua; Tempero, Grant Wayne

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The Rotopiko (Serpentine) lake complex is one of the Waikato region’s few peat lake systems that contains primarily native aquatic plants. Retaining the natural state of the lakes has been considered a high priority by the Department of Conservation (DOC) and extensive efforts have taken place to prevent nutrient leaching and to control invasive organisms in the lakes. The University of Waikato was contracted to investigate the biomass of introduced and native fish in the Rotopiko lakes in order to determine if the fish removal with rotenone, a chemical piscicide, was required as proposed by DOC. Fish were collected using a variety of traps and nets prior to making and release. Following a dispersal period, each lake was then fished a second time and fish biomass was estimated using a capture-mark-release-recapture study design; population estimates were derived using the Lincoln-Petersen method (Nichols 1992).

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  • Preliminary analysis of boat electrofishing in the Waikato River in the vicinity of the Huntly Power Station: Part 1 - fishing on 2 September 2013

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report gives a basic summary of the first sampling of a three-part monitoring project for Genesis Power Ltd (Genesis) that the University of Waikato is undertaking in close collaboration with National Institute of Water and Environmental Research Institute Atmosphere Ltd (NIWA), Hamilton, Boat electrofishing results will eventually be combined with netting undertaken by NIWA in a final report to Genesis. The boat electrofishing survey took place on 2 September, the objective of which was to undertake the first of three surveys to estimate fish distributions and abundances over key seasons: 1. Early spring 2013 (end August/early September) to target peak trout abundances and cyprinid distributions during cooler months of the year. 2. Summer 2014 (Jan/February) to capture peak summer abundances for target indigenous and exotic species. 3. Winter 2014 (June/July) to target mullet and cyprinid distributions during cooler months of the year. At the surveyed reach is about 80 km from the sea, and at this point the Waikato River is a 7th order river with at a bed elevation of about 19.1 m above sea level. The catchment area upstream is 12,188 km², and the river has a mean flow of 352.3 m³ s⁻¹ and a mean annual low flow of 123.5 m³ s⁻¹ (Freshwater Fish Database Assistant version 6.1, I.G. Jowett).

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  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana = The confiscation of Tauranga lands. [Volume 1]

    Stokes, Evelyn (1990)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

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  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana : Volume 2, Documents relating to tribal history, confiscation and reallocation of Tauranga lands.

    Stokes, Evelyn (1993)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

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