307 results for Report, 1990

  • Planning a safe city for women

    Brewster, Karen E. (1994)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 256 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana = The confiscation of Tauranga lands. [Volume 1]

    Stokes, Evelyn (1990)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

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  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana : Volume 2, Documents relating to tribal history, confiscation and reallocation of Tauranga lands.

    Stokes, Evelyn (1993)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

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  • Recent Developments in Organic Food Production in New Zealand: Part 3: Exporting Organic Produce from Gisborne District

    Coombs, Brad; Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John (1998-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is the third in a series of four case studies on the evolution of organic production in key regional areas of New Zealand. The other three case studies are Canterbury (Campbell 1996), Bay of Plenty (Campbell et al.1997) and Nelson (to be completed in mid 1998). The four reports are the main outputs for the research program ‘Optimum Development of Certified Organic Horticulture in New Zealand’, funded by the Public Good Science Fund. The current report presents the findings of research into the development of organic production in Gisborne District1 (see Figure 1.1). Although these findings are significant and stand in their own right as suitable for individual publication, some comparisons are made in the text between the evolution of organics in Gisborne and the development of organics in Canterbury and Bay of Plenty. This mainly involves comparisons between Gisborne and Canterbury, because organic crops and an individual company – Heinz-Wattie Ltd.2 – have been prominent in both areas. This enables the Gisborne case study to be more fully understood. Nevertheless, extensive comparisons are not made in this report: they have been set aside for a future publication to be completed after the Nelson report.

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  • Recent Developments in Organic Food Production in New Zealand: Part 2: Kiwifruit in the Bay of Plenty

    Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John; Steven, David (1997)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report presents the findings of research into the development of organic kiwifruit production in the Bay of Plenty. These results form the second of four case studies which constitute the Public Good Science Fund programme ‘Optimum Development of Certified Organic Horticulture in New Zealand’. The other case study regions are Canterbury (Campbell 1996), Gisborne (to be completed during 1997) and Nelson (to be completed by 1998). The primary objective of this report is to document developments in the organic export industry in the Bay of Plenty. Comparisons between Canterbury and the Bay of Plenty have occasionally been included in this report in order to provide more clarity about the development of organic production in the Bay of Plenty itself. While there is some discussion of the differences between Canterbury and the Bay of Plenty in the Conclusion, these are only brief. Full comparison of the regional factors influencing the development of organic exporting will be set aside until all four case studies have been completed.

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  • Strategies for 'Greening' the New Zealand Pipfruit Export Industry: The Development of IFP and Organic Systems

    McKenna, Megan; Campbell, Hugh (1999)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report provides an introduction to New Zealand’s pipfruit industry, and a review of different attempts within the industry to produce fruit which has an enhanced environmental or ‘food safety’ profile. While the New Zealand pipfruit industry has been recognised throughout its history as a producer of high quality fruit, in the last five years there has been increasing pressure from both consumers and trade regulators to formalise production practices that are ‘safe’ and guarantee minimum consumer risk through unacceptable chemical residues. Collectively we refer to these strategies as ‘greening’, however, as this report will detail, there are many factors prompting greening of exports and the potential strategic responses vary.

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  • Strategies for 'Greening' the New Zealand Honey Industry: An Evaluation of the Development of Organic and Other Standards

    Bourn, Diane; Newton, Bronwyn; Campbell, Hugh (1999)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The overall aim of this research programme is to examine the ‘greening’ of five sectors within NZ Horticultural production - kiwifruit, wine, squash, apples and honey. This study of the honey industry comes at the later stages of a 5-year programme of research into the differing strategies that horticultural industries are deploying to respond to ‘greening’ pressures in markets. In prior studies into the processed vegetable - (Campbell, 1996), kiwifruit (Campbell et al., 1997), sweetcorn (Coombes et al., 1998) and organic fresh fruit and vegetable (Coombes and Campbell, 1998) industries, various factors were identified which have created a new trading environment for horticultural exports. Specifically, an environment in which increasingly stringent ‘food safety’ and ‘environmentally enhanced’ criteria are applied to food exports is developing - both at the regulatory level and in the purchasing preferences of distributors and consumers (Campbell and Coombes, 1999). While the overall findings of prior industry studies have identified a general trend towards ‘greening’ exports, the pressures for greening are felt unevenly through horticultural sectors and levels of response have also varied significantly. The purpose of the current series of industry studies is to identify the current configuration of horticultural industries towards greening, and to identify the kinds of social and industry dynamics which are influencing industry strategies (or inhibiting the formation of such strategies) in each sector. Each report therefore serves as a benchmark for each industry that can then be used to assess the overall movement towards sustainable practices in NZ horticulture.

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  • Recent Developments in Organic Food Production in New Zealand: Part 4: The Expansion of Organic Food Production in Nelson and Golden Bay

    Coombs, Brad; Campbell, Hugh (1998)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report presents the fourth and final case study in a program of research on the changes within organic production in key regional areas of New Zealand. The four reports are the results of a body of research funded by the Public Good Science Fund and titled ‘Optimum Development of Certified Organic Horticulture in New Zealand’. Specifically, the present report examines the evolution of organic production in the Nelson/Golden Bay1 area of the South Island. During the early 1980s, inhabitants of that area were some of the first in New Zealand to become involved in sales of organic produce, with an even longer history of non-commercial, self-sufficiency oriented organic production. In this historical respect, the area stands in contrast to some of the other regions examined in the current series of reports. Of the other three, it is most similar to the situation in Canterbury (Campbell 1996), where organics also started in the domestic and informal sectors of the economy. However, while the domestic component of organics has grown in Canterbury, it has also become secondary in terms of both volume and value to the organic goods exported from that region. It is the lack of a sizeable export organic industry in Nelson which has drawn the attention of the current authors. Organic wine/grapes (Vitus vinifera), hops (Humulus lupulus), kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa), nashi (Pyrus pyrifolia) and bee products are exported from the Nelson region but their volume is relatively small when placed alongside the volume of exports in other organic producing areas with a similar number of producers. The relative absence of organic exporting means that the structure of the organic industry in Nelson is radically different from that in the export oriented Bay of Plenty (Campbell et al. 1997) and Gisborne District (Coombes et al. 1998). In the latter case, there is almost no sign of a domestic industry, this highlighting the differing extremes of regionalisation in New Zealand’s organic industry. While these comparisons are interesting, and while they will be made at various points throughout this report, extensive comparisons have been set aside for a future publication devoted singularly to that task.

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  • The Development of Organic Horticultural Exports in New Zealand

    Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John (1998)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The following report presents a summary of findings from a series of publications arising from the FRST Public Good Science Fund programme ‘Optimum Development of Certified Organic Horticulture in New Zealand’. This research programme started in 1995, and in mid 1998 had completed three years of research into four regional case studies of organic export development. To date, there have been a number of reports and other publications which have sought to outline various aspects of organic agriculture in New Zealand1, contribute to reviews of the organic industry2, or attempt to situate organic developments in New Zealand within wider trends in world agriculture, politics and trade3. Given the wide content of these publications, the many different arenas in which they have been published, and the encouraging level of interest from members of the organic agriculture industry, it is timely that an attempt be made to provide a basic summary of the findings. The present report attempts to do this in a way that is accessible to participants in the industry, and which will attempt to answer key questions about the industry. The most important issue is identifying key factors involved in successful exporting of organic products.

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  • Recent Developments in Organic Food Production in New Zealand: Part 1: Organic Food Exporting in Canterbury

    Campbell, Hugh (1996)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Since 1990, the exporting of certified organic produce has emerged as a new industry in New Zealand. Five provinces – Canterbury, Gisborne, Bay of Plenty, Hawkes Bay and Manawatu – provide the majority of exports with two business organisations – the Kiwifruit Marketing Board, and Wattie Frozen Foods Ltd. – being prominent in this. In 1990, a MAF report (MAF 1991) estimated that the total value of organic production in New Zealand (primarily directed at the domestic market) was around NZ$1.1 million. Since that time there has been a massive increase in the value of organic production, and in the 1995/ 96 year, the newly formed Organic Products Exporting Group assessed the export value of its members at NZ$12 million. Given that this ignored those few organisations outside the group and also did not assess the size of the domestic market, it could be conservatively estimated that the total annual value of organic product in New Zealand was NZ$15 million by 1996. While this figure is not large by comparison to some of New Zealand’s established export industries it is still around 25% of the export value of wine – one of the most high profile new primary production sectors in New Zealand.

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  • Hauora: Maori standards of health III: a study of the years 1970-1991

    Pomare, E; Keefe-Ormsby, V; Ormsby, C; Pearce, N; Reid, Mary-Jane; Robson, B; Watene-Haydon, N (1995)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • NZ Food: NZ People - Key results of the 1997 National Nutrition Survey

    Russell, D; Parnell, W; Wilson, N; Faed, J; Ferguson, E; Herbison, P; Horwath, C; Reid, Mary-Jane; Nye, T; Walker, R; Wilson, B; Tukuitonga, C (1999)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • VLSI layouts and DNA physical mappings

    Dinneen, MJ (1995-03-16)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    We show that an important problem ($k$-ICG) in computational biology is equivalent to a colored version of a well-known graph layout problem ($k$-CVS).

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  • Consuming identity : modernity and tourism in New Zealand

    Taylor, John Patrick (1998)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    What do visitors to New Zealand seek to gain from their travels, and in what ways are such expectations shaped? This work assesses the relationship between tourism-related discourse and identity, and ideas about distance and difference, by exploring aspects in the promotion and production of tourism products in New Zealand. Travellers to New Zealand often seek the "unspoilt" in nature, that which represents a beauty and "authenticity" seen to be lacking "at home". Likewise, infused with ideas regarding "ethnicity" and the traditional (as well as residual notions of the primitive or noble savage), images of Maaori in tourism are situated in relation to the "modern" tourist's self. For many travellers to New Zealand, alongside physical travel with its timetables and ticket stubs is a parallel symbolic journey through Time. Reversing Western narratives of progress and the Fall, the travellers' quest is to "unwind" the coils of technological - and often "intellectual" - Time. This work traces the fundamental ideological components of this world-view from the colonial period through to present-day tourism. What emerged in the early period of tourism development was the production and propagation of a pseudo-knowledge surrounding New Zealand's natural heritage and Maaori population. Although the last century has seen changes in styles of tourism, promotion, production, travel and tourist behaviour, it is argued that this prevailing system of representation continues to influence tourist perceptions of New Zealand and Maaori in negative ways. The ideas put forward by colonial writers concerning Otherness in nature and culture have remained as essential features of present tourism discourse. These have taken concrete form in a range of tourism related products which tend to promote a specifically modernist perception of place. Such works not only provide potential tourists with practical information about New Zealand as a holiday destination, but they also circulate within wider discursive fields that seek to legitimate ideological projects and further their cause.

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  • Raurimu frontier town 1900-1925 : a social archaeological perspective

    Hill, Kate (1999)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Sites associated with railway construction have received little attention in New Zealand historical archaeology, partly because their transient nature has left virtually no mark in the archaeological record, and partly through poor or lost documentation. In the case of the camps associated with the building of the central portion of the North Island Main Trunk Line, some were 10 evolve into thriving sawmilling towns. However, the finite nature of this extractive industry and the change from a rail to a road centred transport system eventually condemned many such towns to obscurity. This volume aims to reconstruct, through the usc of archival evidence and archaeological reconnaissance, the trajectory of the settlement of Raurimu from its origins as a Main Trunk construction camp to its eventual establishment as a sawmilling / railway town which was devastated by fire in IlJ25. Situated in the immediate vicinity of the highly publicised Raurimu Spiral, the construction camp embodies the problem of bias inherent in much archaeological or historical research that involves the juxtaposition of the transient and the monumental. Typically. the monument has been privileged at the expense of the mundane. I consider a multitude of social issues with a specific focus on gender as well as briefly addressing transient communities, the private enterprise that accompanied them, and relations between the co-operative workers and the Public Works Department. As a microcosm of the established town's economic vicissitudes, the Spiral Refreshment Rooms provide the material for a short case slUdy. The destructive and "preservative" role played by fire in the settlement is also considered. The functional transition from railway construction to sawmilling is found to be parallelled by a physical transition from one locality to another. Indicators of permanence are traced through changes in the occupational base of the population, increasing numbers of women, an increase in permanent housing and the establishment of Government facilities and community institutions.

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  • Protecting historic places in New Zealand

    Allen, Harry (1998)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The government should create a new heritage agency to purchase Crown heritage services, provide policy advice to the Crown, take responsibility for national heritage strategies, policies, methodologies and standards, identify nationally significant heritage through a Register and finally, protect and manage nationally significant heritage through a balance of voluntary incentives (national heritage fund) and regulation. Given the totality of Acts administered by local and central government which have a direct impact on Maori heritage, a new stand alone Maori heritage body is needed, one that is charged with the advancement of Maori heritage interests both within and outside of government.

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  • Te Whiuwhiu o te Hau Maori Counselling Certificate Programme: Agency placements and supervision. Summary of and evaluation

    Moeke-Pickering, Taima Materangatira; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (1995-01-01)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Three major characteristics in determining a potentially successful practicum were identified. Firstly, the importance of determining early on whether an agency can expose the student to the necessary counselling experience that enables students to meet the requirements of the course. Secondly, the importance of exposing students to information that enable them to efficiently achieve practicum placement goals. Thirdly, the need to utilise both reflective and skills based assessment to assess the development of counselling skills, as well as the completion of tasks and duties that are required of students. Further information was gleaned about the research participants' perspectives on supervision procedures, practicum contracts, benefits of having a practicum placement and suggested training areas for the proposed TWH supervision module.

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  • An evaluation of the effectiveness of social equity strategies for Maori students in the School of Science and Technology

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (1999-11-11)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    In 1991 the School of Science and Technology (SOSAT) at the University of Waikato had a very low participation rate of Maori and students from other non-dominant ethnic groups. This situation was serious enough to concerned the then Dean of the School and strategies were developed to change this situation. Four major strategies are used to encourage, support and retain Maori students to successfully pursue and complete a degree in Science. They are: the Te Putahi o te Manawa programme - a mentoring programme; a scholarship and grant writing strategy (in particular assistance with Tuapapa Putaiao Maori Fellowships(TPMFs) administered by FRST); school visits; and field trips with secondary schools in the Waikato region that have a high proportion of Maori students. The Maori & Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) was contracted by Gary Bramley of the Equity Office of the SOSAT to conduct this evaluation. Evaluative information was gathered through administering questionnaires, completing key informant interviews, and completing focus group interviews. In this evaluation we sought to determine the effectiveness of the social equity strategies for Maori students in the SOSAT at the University of Waikato.

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  • Hauraki Gulf tideways: Elements of their natural sciences

    Harris, T. F. W. (Thomas Frank Wyndham) (1993)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    GULF TIDEWAYS: AUCKLAND TO CAPE RODNEY. The 60 km between Auckland and Cape Rodney is a special stretch of New Zealand Coast in which there are a dozen tideways, most of which still enrich the landscape with their variety and perform vital biological roles. They are of a size such that the eye can readily encompass their width, and of a depth sufficiently shallow to reveal the tidal rhythms. They are remarkable because, although set in a shallow coast, their incised embayments have, as yet, resisted the straightening which is the usual response of coastlines to natural forces. There is nothing quite like them in New Zealand. These Gulf Tideways have much in common. They share a geophysical background and similarities of flora and fauna, sufficient, perhaps, for them to be viewed as species of the same family. They are variously named Harbours, Rivers, Estuaries and Creeks. Unlike the common perception of an estuary their river components are relatively small. For convenience the term "tideway" has been used for all of them. Research work on the tideways has been active but uneven. Thus Whangateau Harbour has, since the 1960s, been the subject of continuing investigation by postgraduate biology students of the University of Auckland, whose work on it has been facilitated by its manageable size. The Upper Waitemata Harbour received intensive attention by a special interdisciplinary study in the early 1980's. Certain aspects of the Mahurangi have been studied by students, engineering consultants and the Auckland Regional Water Board. Preliminary surveys have been carried out on the Matakana by the Auckland Regional Water Board and Bioresearches Ltd, and on the Waiwera by the Parks Board and the University. The University of Auckland's Leigh Marine Laboratory, a coastal observatory, has on record long time series of the coastal meteorology and oceanography of Gulf waters, which are common to all the tideways. The research has been the work of specialists. The rapid development of their fields of study has meant that their attention has had to be concentrated on a relatively narrow front in a particular tideway. Furthermore, the results of their investigations have been published in a wide variety of scientific journals and reports, usually catering for a limited group and ordinarily not easily accessible. The consequence of this is that their work has not been as widely appreciated as it might have been, nor has it been viewed as part of a whole. It seemed worthwhile to try to redress these shortcomings. Treating the tideways as units within one book has meant concentrating on the important features and interrelationships, especially the conditioning of the biological by the geophysical. This has necessitated selection which has inevitably meant a sacrifice of depth of treatment of any one discipline, a shortcoming which, it is hoped, will be compensated for by the attempt to unify. The treatment is at the level of a primer. This approach could be of interest to specialist students and research workers who might value an introduction to disciplines other than their own, or to students of natural systems. Most of the twelve tideways and their catchments are very great assets to the region. If, in keeping with the times, a new perception, based on respect for them as entities, were to take hold, they might have a future, though it is difficult to be optimistic.

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  • Adjoints, Absolute Values and Polar Decompostions

    Bridges, D.S; Richman, F; Schuster, P (1997-11)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Various questions about adjoints, absolute values and polar decompositions of operators are addressed from a constructive point of view. The focus is on bilinear forms. Conditions are given for the existence of an adjoint, and a general notion of a polar decomposition is developed. The Riesz representation theorem is proved without countable choice.

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