377 results for Report, 1990

  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana = The confiscation of Tauranga lands. [Volume 1]

    Stokes, Evelyn (1990)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

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  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana : Volume 2, Documents relating to tribal history, confiscation and reallocation of Tauranga lands.

    Stokes, Evelyn (1993)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

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  • Consuming identity : modernity and tourism in New Zealand

    Taylor, John Patrick (1998)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    What do visitors to New Zealand seek to gain from their travels, and in what ways are such expectations shaped? This work assesses the relationship between tourism-related discourse and identity, and ideas about distance and difference, by exploring aspects in the promotion and production of tourism products in New Zealand. Travellers to New Zealand often seek the "unspoilt" in nature, that which represents a beauty and "authenticity" seen to be lacking "at home". Likewise, infused with ideas regarding "ethnicity" and the traditional (as well as residual notions of the primitive or noble savage), images of Maaori in tourism are situated in relation to the "modern" tourist's self. For many travellers to New Zealand, alongside physical travel with its timetables and ticket stubs is a parallel symbolic journey through Time. Reversing Western narratives of progress and the Fall, the travellers' quest is to "unwind" the coils of technological - and often "intellectual" - Time. This work traces the fundamental ideological components of this world-view from the colonial period through to present-day tourism. What emerged in the early period of tourism development was the production and propagation of a pseudo-knowledge surrounding New Zealand's natural heritage and Maaori population. Although the last century has seen changes in styles of tourism, promotion, production, travel and tourist behaviour, it is argued that this prevailing system of representation continues to influence tourist perceptions of New Zealand and Maaori in negative ways. The ideas put forward by colonial writers concerning Otherness in nature and culture have remained as essential features of present tourism discourse. These have taken concrete form in a range of tourism related products which tend to promote a specifically modernist perception of place. Such works not only provide potential tourists with practical information about New Zealand as a holiday destination, but they also circulate within wider discursive fields that seek to legitimate ideological projects and further their cause.

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  • Raurimu frontier town 1900-1925 : a social archaeological perspective

    Hill, Kate (1999)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Sites associated with railway construction have received little attention in New Zealand historical archaeology, partly because their transient nature has left virtually no mark in the archaeological record, and partly through poor or lost documentation. In the case of the camps associated with the building of the central portion of the North Island Main Trunk Line, some were 10 evolve into thriving sawmilling towns. However, the finite nature of this extractive industry and the change from a rail to a road centred transport system eventually condemned many such towns to obscurity. This volume aims to reconstruct, through the usc of archival evidence and archaeological reconnaissance, the trajectory of the settlement of Raurimu from its origins as a Main Trunk construction camp to its eventual establishment as a sawmilling / railway town which was devastated by fire in IlJ25. Situated in the immediate vicinity of the highly publicised Raurimu Spiral, the construction camp embodies the problem of bias inherent in much archaeological or historical research that involves the juxtaposition of the transient and the monumental. Typically. the monument has been privileged at the expense of the mundane. I consider a multitude of social issues with a specific focus on gender as well as briefly addressing transient communities, the private enterprise that accompanied them, and relations between the co-operative workers and the Public Works Department. As a microcosm of the established town's economic vicissitudes, the Spiral Refreshment Rooms provide the material for a short case slUdy. The destructive and "preservative" role played by fire in the settlement is also considered. The functional transition from railway construction to sawmilling is found to be parallelled by a physical transition from one locality to another. Indicators of permanence are traced through changes in the occupational base of the population, increasing numbers of women, an increase in permanent housing and the establishment of Government facilities and community institutions.

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  • Protecting historic places in New Zealand

    Allen, Harry (1998)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The government should create a new heritage agency to purchase Crown heritage services, provide policy advice to the Crown, take responsibility for national heritage strategies, policies, methodologies and standards, identify nationally significant heritage through a Register and finally, protect and manage nationally significant heritage through a balance of voluntary incentives (national heritage fund) and regulation. Given the totality of Acts administered by local and central government which have a direct impact on Maori heritage, a new stand alone Maori heritage body is needed, one that is charged with the advancement of Maori heritage interests both within and outside of government.

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  • Te Whiuwhiu o te Hau Maori Counselling Certificate Programme: Agency placements and supervision. Summary of and evaluation

    Moeke-Pickering, Taima Materangatira; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (1995-01-01)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Three major characteristics in determining a potentially successful practicum were identified. Firstly, the importance of determining early on whether an agency can expose the student to the necessary counselling experience that enables students to meet the requirements of the course. Secondly, the importance of exposing students to information that enable them to efficiently achieve practicum placement goals. Thirdly, the need to utilise both reflective and skills based assessment to assess the development of counselling skills, as well as the completion of tasks and duties that are required of students. Further information was gleaned about the research participants' perspectives on supervision procedures, practicum contracts, benefits of having a practicum placement and suggested training areas for the proposed TWH supervision module.

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  • Hauraki Gulf tideways: Elements of their natural sciences

    Harris, T. F. W. (Thomas Frank Wyndham) (1993)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    GULF TIDEWAYS: AUCKLAND TO CAPE RODNEY. The 60 km between Auckland and Cape Rodney is a special stretch of New Zealand Coast in which there are a dozen tideways, most of which still enrich the landscape with their variety and perform vital biological roles. They are of a size such that the eye can readily encompass their width, and of a depth sufficiently shallow to reveal the tidal rhythms. They are remarkable because, although set in a shallow coast, their incised embayments have, as yet, resisted the straightening which is the usual response of coastlines to natural forces. There is nothing quite like them in New Zealand. These Gulf Tideways have much in common. They share a geophysical background and similarities of flora and fauna, sufficient, perhaps, for them to be viewed as species of the same family. They are variously named Harbours, Rivers, Estuaries and Creeks. Unlike the common perception of an estuary their river components are relatively small. For convenience the term "tideway" has been used for all of them. Research work on the tideways has been active but uneven. Thus Whangateau Harbour has, since the 1960s, been the subject of continuing investigation by postgraduate biology students of the University of Auckland, whose work on it has been facilitated by its manageable size. The Upper Waitemata Harbour received intensive attention by a special interdisciplinary study in the early 1980's. Certain aspects of the Mahurangi have been studied by students, engineering consultants and the Auckland Regional Water Board. Preliminary surveys have been carried out on the Matakana by the Auckland Regional Water Board and Bioresearches Ltd, and on the Waiwera by the Parks Board and the University. The University of Auckland's Leigh Marine Laboratory, a coastal observatory, has on record long time series of the coastal meteorology and oceanography of Gulf waters, which are common to all the tideways. The research has been the work of specialists. The rapid development of their fields of study has meant that their attention has had to be concentrated on a relatively narrow front in a particular tideway. Furthermore, the results of their investigations have been published in a wide variety of scientific journals and reports, usually catering for a limited group and ordinarily not easily accessible. The consequence of this is that their work has not been as widely appreciated as it might have been, nor has it been viewed as part of a whole. It seemed worthwhile to try to redress these shortcomings. Treating the tideways as units within one book has meant concentrating on the important features and interrelationships, especially the conditioning of the biological by the geophysical. This has necessitated selection which has inevitably meant a sacrifice of depth of treatment of any one discipline, a shortcoming which, it is hoped, will be compensated for by the attempt to unify. The treatment is at the level of a primer. This approach could be of interest to specialist students and research workers who might value an introduction to disciplines other than their own, or to students of natural systems. Most of the twelve tideways and their catchments are very great assets to the region. If, in keeping with the times, a new perception, based on respect for them as entities, were to take hold, they might have a future, though it is difficult to be optimistic.

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  • Adjoints, Absolute Values and Polar Decompostions

    Bridges, D.S; Richman, F; Schuster, P (1997-11)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Various questions about adjoints, absolute values and polar decompositions of operators are addressed from a constructive point of view. The focus is on bilinear forms. Conditions are given for the existence of an adjoint, and a general notion of a polar decomposition is developed. The Riesz representation theorem is proved without countable choice.

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  • Uniform Orthogonal Group Divisible Designs with Block Size Three

    Colbourn, C.J; Gibbons, P.B (1996-08)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The spectrum of orthogonal group divisible designs with block size three, and u groups each of size g, is studied. Existence is settled with few possible exceptions for each group size g.

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  • Small Trivalent Graphs of Large Girth

    Conder, M (1997-06)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Definitions are given for seven trivalent Cayley graphs, of girths 17; 18; 20; 21; 22; 23 and 24. At the time of writing (June 1997) each of these is the smallest known trivalent graph of the corresponding girth.

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  • A Glimpse into Natural Computing

    Calude, C.S; Paun, G; Tataram, Monica (1999-12)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    We consider as pertaining to Natural Computing (in some sense, characterizing it) the following five domains: Neural Networks, Genetic Algorithms, DNA Computing, Membrane Computing, and Quantum Computing. The first two domains are well established, the last three are just now looking for a place in the toolkit of practitioners. Here, we briefly introduce the last three domains to the reader. The main point is that in all these areas one aims at solving intractable (NP-complete) problems in polynomial (in many cases, even linear) time. Taking into account that most significant practical problems (optimization, scheduling, programming, combinatorial, etc.) are intractable, it follows that the promises of Natural Computing should be taken seriously.

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  • Sequentially Continuous Linear Mappings in Constructive Analysis

    Bridges, D.S; Mines, R (1996-10)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    A mapping u : X → Y between metric spaces is sequentially continuous if for each sequence (xn) converging to x Є X (u(xn)) converges to u(x). It is well known in classical mathematics that a sequentially continuous mapping between metric spaces is continuous; but, as all proofs of this result involve the law of excluded middle, there appears to be a constructive distinction between sequential continuity and continuity. Although this distinction is worth exploring in its own right, there is another reason why sequential continuity is interesting to the constructive mathematician: Ishihara [8] has a version of Banach’s inverse mapping theorem in functional analysis that involves the sequential continuity, rather than continuity, of the linear mappings; if this result could be upgraded by deleting the word “sequential”, then we could prove constructively the standard versions of the inverse mapping theorem and the closed graph theorem. Troelstra [9] showed that in Brouwer’s intuitionistic mathematics (INT) a sequentially continuous mapping on a separable metric space is continuous. On the other hand, Ishihara [6], [7] proved constructively that the continuity of sequentially continuous mappings on a separable metric space is equivalent to a certain boundedness principle for subsets of N in the same paper, he showed that the latter principle holds within the recursive constructive mathematics (RUSS) of the Markov School. Since it is not known whether that principle holds within Bishop’s constructive mathematics (BISH), of which INT and RUSS are models and which can be regarded as the constructive core of mathematics, the exploration of sequential continuity within BISH holds some interest. In this paper we derive some results about sequentially continuous linear mappings within BISH. These results tend to reinforce our hope that such mappings may turn out to be bounded (continuous) after all. For background material on BISH, see [1], and for information about the relation between BISH, INT, and RUSS, see [2].

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  • A Glimpse into Algorithmic Information Theory

    Calude, C.S (1999-02)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper is a subjective, short overview of algorithmic information theory. We critically discuss various equivalent algorithmical models of randomness motivating a "randomness hypothesis". Finally some recent results on computably enumerable random reals are reviewed.

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  • Computable $p$-adic Numbers

    Kapoulas, G (1999-11)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    In the present work the notion of the computable (primitive recursive, polynomially time computable) p-adic number is introduced and studied. Basic properties of these numbers and the set of indices representing them are established and it is proved that the above defined fields are p-adically closed. Using the notion of a notation system introduced by Y. Moschovakis an abstract characterization of the indices representing the field of computable p-adic numbers is established.

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  • Computational Complementarity and Sofic Shifts

    Calude, C.S; Lipponen, M (1997-08)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Finite automata (with outputs but no initial states) have been extensively used as models of computational complementarity, a property which mimics the physical complementarity. All this work was focussed on “frames", i.e., on fixed, static, local descriptions of the system behaviour. In this paper we are mainly interested in the asymptotical description of complementarity. To this aim we will study the asymptotical behaviour of two complementarity principles by associating to every incomplete deterministic automaton (with outputs, but no initial state) certain sofic shifts: automata having the same behaviour correspond to a unique sofic shift. In this way, a class of sofic shifts reflecting complementarity will be introduced and studied. We will prove that there is a strong relation between “local complementarity", as it is perceived at the level of “frames", and “asymptotical complementarity" as it is described by the sofic shift.

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  • Tracing Lazy Functional Languages

    Gibbons, J; Wansbrough, K (1995-08)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    We argue that Ariola and Felleisen's and Maraist, Odersky and Wadler's axiomatization of the call-by-need lambda calculus forms a suitable formal basis for tracing evaluation in lazy functional languages. In particular, it allows a one-dimensional textual representation of terms, rather than requiring a two-dimensional graphical representation using arrows. We describe a program LetTrace, implemented in Gofer and tracing lazy evaluation of a subset of Gofer.

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  • Nonassociative Computable Rings and Their Isomorphisms. (1997)

    Khoussainov, B.; Slinko, A. (1997-08)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    We investigate computable isomorphism types of (nonassociative) rings. We prove that for any n Є ω U {ω} there exists a ring with exactly n computable isomorphism types. We also investigate the relationship between the number of computable isomorphism types of a ring and the number of computable isomorphism types of its expansion by a finite number of constants.

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  • Update Games and Update Networks

    Dinneen, Michael; Khoussainov, B (1999-06)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this paper we model infinite processes with finite configurations as infinite games over finite graphs. We investigate those games, called update games, in which each configuration occurs an infinite number of times during a two-person play. We also present an efficient polynomial-time algorithm (and partial characterization) for deciding if a graph is an update network.

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  • Practical Enumeration Methods for Graphs of Bounded Pathwidth and Treewidth

    Dinneen, Michael (1997-09)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Using an algebraic representation for graphs of bounded pathwidth or treewidth we provide simple methods for generating these families in increasing order of the number of vertices and edges. We also study canonic representions of fixed- and free- boundaried graphs of bounded width.

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  • Chaitin Omega Numbers and Strong Reducibilities

    Calude, C.S; Nies, A (1997-10)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    We prove that any Chaitin Ω number (i.e., the halting probability of a universal self-delimiting Turing machine) is wtt-complete, but not tt-complete. In this way we obtain a whole class of natural examples of wtt-complete but not tt-complete r.e. sets. The proof is direct and elementary.

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