42 results for Report, Massey Research Online

  • An Evaluation of Clinical Supervision of Allied Health Professionals from Two District Health Boards: A preliminary summary report

    O'Donoghue, KB

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Māori farming trusts - A preliminary scoping investigation into the governance and management of large dairy farm businesses.

    Phillips, Tom; Woods, Christine; Lythberg, Billie

    Report
    Massey University

    This preliminary scoping study investigates areas for possible improvement in the governance and management of large Māori dairy farm businesses. Building on the innovative practices of their tūpuna – including Rawiri Taiwhanga, the country’s first commercial dairy farmer – Māori are defining their own aspirations, realities and goals in the dairy farming world (Durie 1998, 2000). This report outlines these, and their accompanying challenges, as expressed by individuals and collectives currently engaged in Māori Dairy farm businesses. The Māori way of doing business is described in this study as having a ‘Quadruple Bottom Line of Profit, People, Environment and Community’ business objectives. More specifically, ‘Māori farms often have an inverted Quadruple Bottom Line. People, Environment and their Community often come before Profit….but without Profit none of it happens.’ Māori strategic plans and business values place emphasis on relationships, responsibilities, reciprocity and respect. These are exemplars of a Māori world-view, which explicitly acknowledges particular historic and cultural contexts (Tapsell and Woods 2010). The strategic management plans of the Māori Farming Trusts illustrate the spiral or matrix of values ‘He korunga o nga tikanga’ envisaged by Nicholson, Hēnare and Woods (2012). They prioritise the development of social capital to create competitive advantage. Such strategic plans reflect Māori vision and aspirations. These are to sustain and grow the land base; to provide leadership and guidance for the whānau; to develop capacity and resources within the Trusts and to perform better as businesses.

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  • Active music

    Rickson, Daphne; Evans, Axel; Claydon, Natasha Ratitihuia; Dennis, Patrice; Dovey, Kate; Francis, Tess Kiernan; Pollock, Janiece; Sos, Shafiq; Erin, Upjohn-Beatson; Williams, Kwame; Dombroski, Jacob; McMahon, Sarah; Haanen, Tessa; Watkins, Edward

    Report
    Massey University

    We are a group of eleven young people with intellectual disability and three music therapists. We did action research at a university. We wanted to find out how a music group might be helpful for young people with intellectual disabilities. We wanted to tell our own story and use our own words because we have a lot to say. We wanted people to read our story and to use our ideas to help young people with intellectual disabilities to have good lives. We went to twenty sessions of music research, and five more sessions of research analysis. We also did a lot of research work in between sessions. We found out that music groups can be fun. They can also be hard work. They help us develop skills like listening and waiting. They are places where we can be independent. But music groups are also good places to practice working as a team. They can be safe places for people to express emotions. Music helps us to know people. It brings us together. Playing musical instruments can also help physical development. A good life for us would include having the chance to play music with others or to have music lessons. But it is not always easy for us to go to ordinary lessons or music groups. It might be important for young people with intellectual disability to have support from people who understand them at first. We want to be independent but we need help to develop our dreams in practical ways. We found that doing research is fun and interesting. We were all researchers but we had different things to do. The adults had to be the organisers, setting up the research. We knew from the start the research would be about what young people think about music. The adults had done their reading and had written the literature review. The young people decided on other questions, and gathered data in lots of different ways. They also did some of the analysis, and decided on the findings of each cycle. The findings of each cycle, with more of the young people’s words, are in the appendices. Later, the adults wrote the main findings, the discussion and conclusion. We all discussed the things we wrote along the way and at the end of the research. The adults have tried to help the young people understand what has been written. The research took a lot of time and it was hard work for everybody. To be a good researcher you need to learn research skills. It is important that young people with intellectual disabilities are not exhausted by research. They need to be able to enjoy the things they are doing. We all liked being involved in research even though it was hard work. We think that research is important and helpful. Young people should be involved in research that is about them. We learnt that young people with intellectual disabilities can go to university. Going to university was scary at first but we got used to it and we started to enjoy it. We need to do more research to make sure universities are ready to welcome students with intellectual disabilities. We can use our research to show universities that it can be a good idea to support people with intellectual disabilities to go to university. We can also use our research show people what we can do; what we like to do; and what we want to do in the future. Most of us would like to do more music and research in future.

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  • Lifelong literacy: Issues of strategy

    Sligo, F; Watson, B; Murray, N; Comrie, M; Vaccarino, F; Tilley, E

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Technical report one: Methods for the creation of terms for indexing social work education in Aotearoa New Zealand (TISWEANZ).

    Ballantyne, N; Beddoe, L; Hay, K; Maidment, J; Ngan, L; Walker, S

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Technical report three: TISWEANZ taxonomy.

    Ballantyne, N; Beddoe, L; Hay, K; Maidment, J; Ngan, L; Walker, S

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Climate Change 2014 - Synthesis Report

    Sims, REH

    Report
    Massey University

    An overview report of the Contributions of Working groups 1,2 and 3 to the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

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  • The wider voice: Wanganui community perspectives on adult literacy and employment 2005-2006

    Comrie, M; Tilley, E; Neilson, D; Murray, N; Sligo, F; Vaccarino, F

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • MY FRIENDS Youth final evaluation report

    MacDonald, J; Bourke, R; Berg, M; Burgon, J

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Kia Piki te Ora Suicide Prevention Programme Evaluation Final Report

    Andrews, CA; Manu, H

    Report
    Massey University

    Suicide and suicidal behaviour continue to be a major public health issue in New Zealand. Each year more than 500 New Zealanders take their lives and there are over 2500 admissions to hospital for intentional self-harm. The latest statistics in 2012 show that almost one in five completed suicides were Māori suicides and the Māori youth suicide rates were 2.8 times higher than non-Māori youth. Kia Piki te Ora Māori suicide prevention service (Kia Piki te Ora), operating in nine DHB regions is one element of the social sector’s work towards longer-term goals of reduced suicides, and harm associated with suicidal behaviour in Māori communities. This recent evaluation report shows that generally stakeholders felt that Kia Piki te Ora’s contribution to Māori suicide prevention worked well when providers engaged with the community. However, the widespread of activities undertaken by the nine providers meant that in some instances stakeholders were unclear on the core role and responsibilities of Kia Piki te Ora.

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  • Energy-smart food for people and climate

    Sims, RE

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Developing Valid and Reliable Rubrics for Writing Assessment: Research and Practice

    Comer, KV

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Technical report two: Analysis of curriculum documents.

    Ballantyne, N; Beddoe, L; Hay, K; Maidment, J; Ngan, L; Walker, S

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Barriers to Active Transport in Palmerston North

    Cheyne, CM; Muhammad, I; Scott, M; Tien, C

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • The sustainable delivery of sexual violence prevention education in schools

    Julich, SJ; Oak, E; Terrell, J; Good, G

    Report
    Massey University

    Sexual violence is a crime that cannot be ignored: it causes our communities significant consequences including heavy economic costs, and evidence of its effects can be seen in our criminal justice system, public health system, Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC), and education system, particularly in our schools. Many agencies throughout New Zealand work to end sexual violence. Auckland-based Rape Prevention Education: Whakatu Mauri (RPE) is one such agency, and is committed to preventing sexual violence by providing a range of programmes and initiatives, information, education, and advocacy to a broad range of audiences. Up until early 2014 RPE employed one or two full-time positions dedicated to co-ordinating and training a large pool (up to 15) of educators on casual contracts to deliver their main school-based programmes, BodySafe – approximately 450 modules per year, delivered to some 20 high schools. Each year several of the contract educators, many of whom were tertiary students, found secure full time employment elsewhere. To retain sufficient contract educators to deliver its BodySafe contract meant that RPE had to recruit, induct and train new educators two to three times every year. This model was expensive, resource intense, and ultimately untenable. The Executive Director and core staff at RPE wanted to develop a more efficient and stable model of delivery that fitted its scarce resources. To enable RPE to know what the most efficient model was nationally and internationally, with Ministry of Justice funding, RPE commissioned Massey University to undertake this report reviewing national and international research on sexual violence prevention education (SVPE). [Background from Executive Summary.]

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  • Smaller scale New Zealand dairy farmers: long term plans and key challenges

    Westbrooke, Victoria; Nuthall, Peter; Phillips, Tom

    Report
    Massey University

    Farmer wellbeing has been defined as “a dynamic process that gives people a sense of how their lives are evolving” (Nimpagariste & Culver, 2010). In order to support and enhance the wellbeing of farmers in New Zealand, the farmers’ goals, future plans and challenges to their plans all need to be understood. A particular group of interest is smaller scale dairy farmers. The average size of dairy farms in developed agricultural nations is increasing and New Zealand is no different. A high proportion (62%) of NZ dairy herds are smaller scale, milking less than 400 cows at peak. Their wellbeing, now and in the future, is important to the New Zealand dairy industry as a whole. Consequently, the aim of this study is to develop an understanding of smaller-scale dairy farmers’ future goals, plans and challenges so that recommendations can be made to enhance and support their wellbeing in the future. Farms who peak milked less than 400 cows were surveyed via telephone. A total of 346 surveys were completed, in Taranaki (n=103), the Waikato (n=144) and Northland (n=99). The majority of respondents’ were owner-operators (75%), male (67%), born and bred in a rural area (79%), and between 40 and 60 years old (57%). Overall, the mean farm size was 97ha, with 240 cows producing 86,789kgMS with 0.83 of a full time employee. Respondents’ had high (67%) equity levels in their businesses and a third (35%) had non-farming investments. Farmers’ most likely future investments were related to their current farming business, that is reducing debt to very low levels and increasing production by more than 10%. Based on farmers future plans and challenges reported and discussed in this study, it is clear the smaller scale dairy farmers would like knowledge and assistance in five key areas; succession, regulation and compliance, staff, technology and cash-flow/profitability. This report concludes with suggestions for each of these areas, which has the potential to maintain or increase the wellbeing of smaller scale dairy farmers in New Zealand. [Executive summary]

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  • Self-assessment in tertiary education. Final research report to Ako Aotearoa

    Bourke, R; Tait, C

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • National Health Emergency Plan: A framework for the health and disability sector

    Johal, SS; MacDonald, C; Mitchell, J (2015-10-15)

    Report
    Massey University

    This edition of the National Health Emergency Plan has been revised and updated to reflect current thinking on the health aspects of emergency management in New Zealand and internationally. It reflects the sophistication of a second-generation, risk-based plan developed by emergency management specialists under the leadership of the Joint Centre for Disaster Research in partnership with the Ministry of Health. The plan was developed in consultation with local and international specialists in the field of emergency management, emergency managers and planners in the health and disability sector, and other key stakeholders. A collaborative, consultative approach has been taken throughout the development of the plan, including holding workshops with health emergency management stakeholders across the nation. Constant contact has been maintained with the concurrent review of the National Civil Defence Emergency Management Plan Order 2015 (National CDEM Plan) to ensure consistency between the two plans. In acknowledgement of the importance of evidence-based policy and practice, an extensive international literature review formed the basis for much of the plan’s content. To maintain its alignment with the National CDEM Plan, the National Health Emergency Plan will be reviewed by the Ministry of Health within five years of its adoption. The plan will also be reviewed and updated as required following any new developments or substantial changes to the operations or organisation of New Zealand health and disability services, as a result of lessons from a significant emergency affecting the health of communities or the health and disability sector itself, if new hazards and risks are identified, or by direction of the Minister of Health or Director-General of Health. Annexes at the back of the plan are intended to provide a short document format that can be rapidly updated with new or revised guidance on specific issues as they are identified. The Ministry of Health welcomes submissions of good practice that can be incorporated into future editions.

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  • Creating engineers - climbing the educational stair-case

    Frater, TG; Grigg, NP

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Global media monitoring project national report: New Zealand

    Fountaine, SL

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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