1,617 results for Report, ResearchSpace@Auckland

  • Comment on: Cross-border portfolios: assets, liabilities and wealth transfers

    Berka, Martin (2015-10)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • HD Sheep Model (A-2476) Project Report October 2011

    Reid, Susanne; Bawden, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This Interim review provides a summary of the work that has been undertaken by researchers from SARDI and University of Auckland on the HD Sheep Biomolecular project over the 6 month period from 1st April 2011-30th September 2011. This report does not include data that was incorporated in the previous report unless noted. The aim of this work is to further characterize the ovine model of Huntington's disease (HD) in order to gain a better understanding of disease progression, and to establish it as a therapeutic testing system. Our objective was to develop a model that will recapitulate the progressive, late-onset characteristics of the disease expressing the full-length huntingtin protein with a moderate (in model terms) CAG repeat size. Although not yet conclusive, we have good evidence that the model will fulfill our initial objectives. Support from the CHDI since October 2009 (A-2476) has enabled the characterization and flock expansion of the sheep transgenic model, identification of the transgenic line "Kiwi" as the favored line for future analysis, establishment of tissue collection protocols and molecular/pathological methodologies for monitoring "disease" progression in the model. A limited breeding program has been initiated from two Taffy line animals that exhibit higher mRNA expression than other Taffy animals, along with detectable transgene protein in skin biopsy. Unlike the Kiwi line, we now know Taffy has multiple integration sites, explaining the variable levels of expression seen. This additional breeding will establish if a viable additional line can be generated, showing adequate and stable transmission. The Kiwi line demonstrates reliable and stable expression of the transgene and repeat. MGH capture sequencing has identified the Kiwi transgene insertion site is at a single locus in an intragenic region. Analysis of harvested brain tissues as the animal's age will demonstrate the extent to which the human disease is being recapitulated. The oldest transgenic sheep have been preserved as a result of SOC discussions, given the intrinsic value of their age with respect to observations of disease progression. A SOC decision was also made to delay the harvest of 18 month animals until 2 years, primarily based on the observation of a small number of inclusions seen in 2 of the 3 18 month animals. The decision to delay sacrifice was to allow phenotype advancement. Therefore the only animals harvested and assessed for a molecular phenotype within the time frame of this contract are 6 months old, with the next harvest scheduled for March 2012 (2 year old animals).

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  • Unintentional injuries at home: the role of alcohol, recreational drug use, & fatigue in the greater Auckland, Waikato, & Otago regions in people aged 20 to 64 years

    Kool, B; Ameratunga, S; Sharpe, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Unintentional injuries in the home account for a significant burden of injury among all age groups in New Zealand. Falls are the leading cause of injury-related admissions to hospital and one of the three leading causes of injury death in New Zealand. Cutting or piercing injuries are the second leading cause of injury hospitalisation in New Zealand. Home is the most common location for injuries resulting in hospitalisation. The impact of injuries at home among young and middle-age adults may have significant implications for both work productivity and family life. This project was designed to explore modifiable risk factors for unintentional falls and cutting or piecing injuries at home resulting in admission to hospital among young and middle-aged adults (aged 20 to 64 years). The study builds on the Auckland Fall Study previously conducted by the researchers and funded by the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). The project involved the following methodologies: a review of the published literature to identify risk factors for unintentional cutting or piercing injury or falls at home among young and middle-aged adults; an analysis of routinely collected national data on hospitalisations and deaths for home injuries; an analysis of trauma registry data for home injuries; and a multi-regional population-based case-control study, with a case-crossover component, to identify modifiable risk factors for unintentional falls and cutting or piercing injures at home among the age group of interest .

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  • Progress toward pathways prioritization in compliance to Aichi Target 9

    Riccardo, S; Genovesi, P; Booy, O; Essl, F; Jeschke, J; Hulme, PE; McGeoch, M; Pagad, Shyama; Roy, HE; Saul, W-C; Wilson, JR (2016)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Data fitness for use in research on alien and invasive species

    McGeoch, M; Groom, QJ; Pagad, Shyama; Petrosyan, V; Wilson, J; Ruiz, G (2016)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The discovery, access and appropriate use of primary biodiversity data are critical for alien and invasive species (A&IS) research at continental, regional, country and subnational scales. Sustainable, reliable, timely, and accessible data on A&IS is essential to the long-term management of this key threat to biodiversity, including the ability of countries to meet the Honolulu Challenge and to achieve Aichi Target 9 of the CBD Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020. GBIF provides a range of essential information services for A&IS researchers, including but not limited to taxonomic and occurrence information. After broad consultation with the research and A&IS community, a suite of recommendations were identified under five broad topic areas: 1) Strategic approaches, 2) Improving existing data, 3) Expanding information content, 4) Functionality, and 5) Communication and engagement. Several recommendations are relevant for other data users, but the availability, quality and timeliness of these data are especially critical for A&IS because of the real-world consequences resulting from the negative impacts of biological invasions. Alien species occurrence includes taxonomically verified species presence records or absence information at a locality with a geographic coordinate, or in a prescribed area, such as a management or geopolitical unit or site (Latombe et al. 2016). Alien species occurrence information is the single most important variable necessary to support research, monitoring and management of A&IS.

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  • Real Exchange Rates and Sectoral Productivity in the Eurozone

    Berka, Martin; Devereux, MB; Engel, C (2015-08-06)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    We investigate the link between real exchange rates and sectoral total factor productivity measures for countries in the Eurozone. We show that real exchange rate variation, both in cross-country and time series, closely accords withan amended Balassa-Samuelson interpretation, incorporating shocks both to sectoral productivity and a labor market wedge. We construct a sticky price dynamic general equilibrium model to generate a cross-section and time series of real exchange rates that can be directly compared to the data. Under the assumption of a common currency, estimates from simulated regressions are very similar to the empirical estimates for the Eurozone. Our findings contrast with previous studies that have found little relationship between productivity levels and the real exchange rate among high-income countries, but those studies have included country pairs which have a floating nominal exchange rate.

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  • Technical support to EU strategy on invasive species (IAS) - Assessment of the impacts of IAS in Europe and the EU (final module report for the European Commission)

    Kettunen, M; Genovesi, P; Gollasch, S; Pagad, Shyama; Starfinger, U; Ten Brink, P; Shine, C (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This assessment provides a picture of the different environmental, social and economic costs and benefits of invasive alien species (IAS) in Europe, constituting the first full assessment of all types of IAS impacts at the pan-European scale. The report is part of the work led by IEEP to support the development of the EU Strategy on IAS.

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  • Technical support to EU strategy on invasive species (IAS) – Policy options to control the negative impacts of IAS on biodiversity in Europe and the EU. Final report for the European Commission

    Shine, C; Kettunen, M; Genovesi, P; Gollasch, S; Pagad, Shyama; Starfinger, U (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This assessment identifies policy measures available to minimise damage of invasive alien species (IAS) to European biodiversity in an efficient and cost-effective manner. It also provides preliminary insights on the feasibility of different policy approaches in the EU context. The report is part of the work led by IEEP to support the development of the EU Strategy on IAS.

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  • RLTS 2010 Health Impact Assessment

    Field, Adrian; Macmillan, Alexandra; Lindsay, Andrew; Tunks, M; Arcus, K; Jayasekera, N (2009-10)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Purpose The following four reports have been prepared to assist the Auckland Regional Transport Committee with preparation of the Auckland Regional Land Transport Strategy 2010 the reports include: • Auckland Regional Land Transport Strategy Health and Wellbeing Impact Assessment – Appraisal Report • Auckland Regional Land Transport Strategy Health Impact Assessment – Scoping Workshop Report • Auckland Regional Land Transport Strategy Health Impact Assessment – Literature Review • Auckland Regional Land Transport Strategy Health Impact Assessment – Area Profile Report

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  • Probability of Error Expressions for Communications in Wireless Sensor Networks over Frequency-selective Channels

    Tian, Jianjie (2016-08-10)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Corporate Sustainability Reporting in New Zealand

    Griffiths, Kerry; Lindesay, J (2006-10-03)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2002 the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment (PCE) signaled in his "Creating Our Future" report, the emergence of "Triple Bottom Line" (environmental, social and economic) reporting in New Zealand: "Other options include the business sector adopting models such as Triple Bottom Line (TBL) reporting and the Natural Step that raise awareness about sustainable ways of doing business." (p17) Since that time TBL reporting has continued to develop in New Zealand in both the public and private sector albeit in a variety of forms and under a variety of names - including Sustainable Development Reporting, Corporate Responsibility Reporting, Sustainability Reporting. This paper provides an update on TBL Reporting in New Zealand since 2002 and covers: - the international context - the state of reporting in New Zealand - the value of reporting - concluding comments While the paper provides a brief commentary on TBL reporting by public sector agencies, the focus of the paper is on reporting by the business sector (including CRIs and state owned enterprises). This paper does not attempt to provide a critical and thorough analysis on the extent to which corporate sustainability reporting contributes to sustainable development per se, although some comment is made on that subject.

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  • Equity Audit of Public Heallth Resource Allocation for National Heart Foundation of New Zealand

    Bhargava, Anuj; Crampton, P; Matheson, A (2006)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Behavioural characteristic of Japanese teachers desired by learners

    Kobayashi, A; Nuibe, Y; Kondo, Reiko; Lane, J; MacInnes, M (2006)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Youth’07: The health and wellbeing of secondary school students in New Zealand: Results for Chinese, Indian and other Asian Students

    Parackal, Sherly; Ameratunga, S; Tin Tin, S; Wong, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report presents findings from Youth’07, the second national survey of the health and wellbeing of secondary school students in New Zealand, for the 1310 students who identified with an Asian ethnic group. It must be noted that ‘Asian’ is not a single ethnic category but a broad range of ethnic groups encompassing a wide range of cultural, language, and migration experiences. In this report we highlight the term ‘Asian’ to remind readers of the particular meaning placed on it and its shortcomings as a single ethnic category. For the same reason, the results for the two largest Asian ethnic groups in the survey – Chinese and Indian – are presented as two separate, specific reports, comparing the findings for each group with those for New Zealand European students, and with the corresponding findings from the previous survey conducted in 2001. This is followed by an overview report on the ‘Asian’ group as a whole, with the caution that these results, averaged across the combined ‘Asian’ group, may mask different experiences relating to specific ethnic groups. Overall, the majority of ‘Asian’ students reported positive family, home and school environments, and positive relationships with adults at home and school. However, Chinese and Indian students were more likely than NZ European students to experience family adversity or hardships (eg, changing homes more often, overcrowding and unemployment among parents). Compared to NZ European students, Chinese and Indian students were more likely to report positive feelings about school. Several school safety indicators have improved since the previous survey in 2001, but a small proportion of Chinese and Indian students continue to report being bullied weekly or more often, many reporting the bullying to be related to their ethnicity. In the 2007 survey, about three-quarters of ‘Asian’ students did not meet the current national guidelines for daily intake of fruit and vegetables, and 91% did not meet the current national guidelines of one or more hours of physical activity per day. Indian students reported similar levels of physical activity to NZ European students while Chinese students reported lower levels of physical activity. The vast majority of ‘Asian’ students reported good health in 2007. However, when health care was needed, many ‘Asian’ students faced barriers to accessing it, including a lack of knowledge of the healthcare system, cost of care and lack of transport. Mental health problems were of particular concern in this population, especially among female students. Among Chinese and Indian students 18% of females and 7-8% of males showed significant depressive symptoms – proportions unchanged since the 2001 survey. The prevalence of smoking, measured both in terms of ever smoking a cigarette and of smoking weekly or more often, had substantially decreased among Chinese students since the 2001 survey. In contrast, among Indian students these indicators showed little change over the same period. Drinking alcohol was less prevalent among Chinese and Indian students than among NZ European students: 35% of Chinese students and 34% of Indian students were current drinkers compared to 66% of NZ European students. While Indian and Chinese students were less likely than NZ European students to be binge drinkers, about 16% reported binge drinking on at least one occasion in the previous 4 weeks. Compared with the 2001 survey, marijuana use had declined among Chinese students but not among Indian students. Chinese and Indian students were more likely than NZ European students to report not using contraception. While the proportion of Chinese students using contraception has remained unchanged since the 2001 survey, the equivalent proportion among Indian students had declined. The majority of ‘Asian’ students reported positive and rewarding friendships, 41% reported spiritual beliefs as important, and a similar proportion attended a place of worship regularly. These proportions had not changed since 2001.

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  • Public Health Workforce Development in Problem Gambling: Literature Review.

    Shepherd, Robin-Marie; Dyall, L; Perese, L; Rossen, F; Tse, S; Campbell, L; Docherty, C; Raeburn, J (2006)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Problem gambling is a new area of specialisation for many in the wider public health workforce both in New Zealand and internationally. This review aims to assess what is now a public health approach to gambling in New Zealand. This review will start with a brief historical account of gambling in New Zealand leading up to a public health approach.

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  • Using Video Feedforward Strategies in Training: Liberian Teachers of Early Reading and Math Project

    Dowrick, Peter (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Violations of the Rights of the Rapa Nui People and Rapa Nui Individuals according to the American Convention on Human Rights

    Tomas, Violet (2012)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    A separate report commissioned by the Observatorio Cuidadano to assess alleged violations by the Chilean government against the Rapa Nui people in 2010 and 2011 under the American Convention on Human Rights.

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  • Educating for diversity: An informative evaluation of the rainbow youth sexuality and gender diversity workshops

    Burford, James; Lucassen, M.F.G.; Penniket, P.; Hamilton, T (2013)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report describes an evaluation of Rainbow Youth’s Sexuality and Gender Diversity Workshops (or Rainbow Youth’s Education Package) for students in secondary education. Rainbow Youth has been delivering Sexuality and Gender Diversity workshops in schools since the 1990s. The programme uses a targeted approach (i.e. where a number of classes from the same school participate in the workshops) to improve the climate of schools with regard to sexuality and gender diversity and to reduce bullying. It involves two one-hour sessions, which are divided between content pertaining to sexuality and gender diversity. The programme is delivered by an educator employed by Rainbow Youth, and volunteer storytellers from the GLBTQI community. Two schools in Auckland participated in this evaluation. We begin this report with a review of literature addressing bullying based on sexuality and gender diversity. Following this, we present the indings from the evaluation. The methodology of the evaluation involved pre- and post-workshop questionnaires which generated quantitative and qualitative data. Data were collected from 229 Year 9 and 10 students during the sexuality diversity workshops and 237 Year 9 and 10 students during the gender diversity workshops.

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  • Assessment moderation services for the Manurewa Enhancement Initiative: Samoan Bilingual Cluster.

    Amitunai-Toloa, M; Tuafuti, P; McCaffery, John; Gaugatao, S (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Stumbling blocks or stepping stones? Students' experience of transition from low-mid decile schools to university

    Madjar, Irena; McKinley, EA; Deynzer, M; Van Der Merwe, A (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    A prospective, longitudinal, qualitative study was undertaken with 44 students from 8 low or mid decile schools over a period of nine months. participants were interviewed at 6-weekly intervals. The study identified a range of barriers that impeded the transition process as well as factors that contributed to more successful transition.

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