1,604 results for Report, ResearchSpace@Auckland

  • Decolonising Cities (Postscript II)

    Jones, Rhys (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Applying randomness to computability

    Nies, Andre (2009)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Beginning Teacher Preparedness: Master of Teaching and Learning Auckland 2014/15 Cohort

    Ward, L; Meissel, Kane; Yao, E (2015-08)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Comment on: Cross-border portfolios: assets, liabilities and wealth transfers

    Berka, Martin (2015-10)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Estimating the abundance of scampi in SCI 3 (Mernoo Bank) in 2013

    Tuck, Ian; Parkinson, D; Armiger, H; Smith, M; Miller, A; Rush, N; Spong, K (2015)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Photographic and trawl surveys of scampi in SCI 3 were conducted in September/October 2013. Estimates of burrows have increased steadily since 2009, with estimates of scampi showing a smaller relative increase. Trawl catch rates were comparable with 2010, and higher than 2009. Over 3300 scampi were tagged and released to investigate growth, and recaptures to date have been low. Scampi emergence patterns were investigated with acoustic tags.

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  • Estimating the abundance of scampi in SCI 6A (Auckland Islands) in 2013

    Tuck, Ian; Parkinson, D; Armiger, H; Smith, M; Miller, A; Rush, N; Spong, K (2015)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Photographic and trawl surveys of scampi in SCI 6A were conducted in March 2013. Estimates of burrows were slightly lower than 2009, but estimates of scampi were comparable with the previous survey. Trawl catch rates were slightly higher than 2009, but comparable with 2007 and 2008. Over 6600 scampi were tagged and released, to investigate growth, with over 100 recaptures to date. Tag mortality was estimated. Scampi emergence patterns were investigated with acoustic tags.

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  • Northland Kauri: Auckland and Northland, New Zealand, January 21-15, 2014. Fieldguide for the 9th International Conference on Dendrochronology, Melbourne, Australia, Post Conference Tour (New Zealand).

    Boswijk, Ingrid; Fowler, A; Lorrey, A (2014-01-21)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • HD Sheep Model (A-2476) Project Report October 2011

    Reid, Susanne; Bawden, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This Interim review provides a summary of the work that has been undertaken by researchers from SARDI and University of Auckland on the HD Sheep Biomolecular project over the 6 month period from 1st April 2011-30th September 2011. This report does not include data that was incorporated in the previous report unless noted. The aim of this work is to further characterize the ovine model of Huntington's disease (HD) in order to gain a better understanding of disease progression, and to establish it as a therapeutic testing system. Our objective was to develop a model that will recapitulate the progressive, late-onset characteristics of the disease expressing the full-length huntingtin protein with a moderate (in model terms) CAG repeat size. Although not yet conclusive, we have good evidence that the model will fulfill our initial objectives. Support from the CHDI since October 2009 (A-2476) has enabled the characterization and flock expansion of the sheep transgenic model, identification of the transgenic line "Kiwi" as the favored line for future analysis, establishment of tissue collection protocols and molecular/pathological methodologies for monitoring "disease" progression in the model. A limited breeding program has been initiated from two Taffy line animals that exhibit higher mRNA expression than other Taffy animals, along with detectable transgene protein in skin biopsy. Unlike the Kiwi line, we now know Taffy has multiple integration sites, explaining the variable levels of expression seen. This additional breeding will establish if a viable additional line can be generated, showing adequate and stable transmission. The Kiwi line demonstrates reliable and stable expression of the transgene and repeat. MGH capture sequencing has identified the Kiwi transgene insertion site is at a single locus in an intragenic region. Analysis of harvested brain tissues as the animal's age will demonstrate the extent to which the human disease is being recapitulated. The oldest transgenic sheep have been preserved as a result of SOC discussions, given the intrinsic value of their age with respect to observations of disease progression. A SOC decision was also made to delay the harvest of 18 month animals until 2 years, primarily based on the observation of a small number of inclusions seen in 2 of the 3 18 month animals. The decision to delay sacrifice was to allow phenotype advancement. Therefore the only animals harvested and assessed for a molecular phenotype within the time frame of this contract are 6 months old, with the next harvest scheduled for March 2012 (2 year old animals).

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  • Hauora: Maori standards of health III: a study of the years 1970-1991

    Pomare, E; Keefe-Ormsby, V; Ormsby, C; Pearce, N; Reid, Mary-Jane; Robson, B; Watene-Haydon, N (1995)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • NZ Food: NZ People - Key results of the 1997 National Nutrition Survey

    Russell, D; Parnell, W; Wilson, N; Faed, J; Ferguson, E; Herbison, P; Horwath, C; Reid, Mary-Jane; Nye, T; Walker, R; Wilson, B; Tukuitonga, C (1999)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Derivations of Probability Density Functions for Indoor Position Estimation

    Mohd Azmi, KH (2017-06-21)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report presents a detailed theoretical approach in developing the es- timator equations and its probability density functions (pdfs) in estimating distance and position of an unknown node in an indoor environment via the received signal strength (RSS) method. The channel parameter equations derived via the maximum likelihood estimation method are presented, in which the information is later used to derive the distance estimator equation and its pdf. It is shown in the report that the pdf of the distance estimator follows a lognormal distribution. The estimator equations for the Cartesian position of the unknown node are also derived and it is shown that both of the position estimator equations are a summation of 3 lognormal terms. Using the Cen- tral Limit Theorem, we have approximated the pdf of the position estimator as Gaussian. Finally, it can be shown in the report that the pdf of radius of positioning error can be approximated as having either Rayleigh distribution or Nakagami-m distribution. However, an empirical investigation must be carried out to determine which distribution provides the best t of the pdf of positioning error.

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  • Ethnicity Matters: Maori perspectives paper for the review of the measurement of ethnicity in official statistics.

    Robson, B; Reid, Mary-Jane (2001)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • I nga wa o oku tupuna - Brief of Evidence to Waitangi Tribunal WAI 1040, WAI 1513

    Ngaha, Arapera; Rogers, MG (2015-04-06)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Unintentional injuries at home: the role of alcohol, recreational drug use, & fatigue in the greater Auckland, Waikato, & Otago regions in people aged 20 to 64 years

    Kool, B; Ameratunga, S; Sharpe, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Unintentional injuries in the home account for a significant burden of injury among all age groups in New Zealand. Falls are the leading cause of injury-related admissions to hospital and one of the three leading causes of injury death in New Zealand. Cutting or piercing injuries are the second leading cause of injury hospitalisation in New Zealand. Home is the most common location for injuries resulting in hospitalisation. The impact of injuries at home among young and middle-age adults may have significant implications for both work productivity and family life. This project was designed to explore modifiable risk factors for unintentional falls and cutting or piecing injuries at home resulting in admission to hospital among young and middle-aged adults (aged 20 to 64 years). The study builds on the Auckland Fall Study previously conducted by the researchers and funded by the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). The project involved the following methodologies: a review of the published literature to identify risk factors for unintentional cutting or piercing injury or falls at home among young and middle-aged adults; an analysis of routinely collected national data on hospitalisations and deaths for home injuries; an analysis of trauma registry data for home injuries; and a multi-regional population-based case-control study, with a case-crossover component, to identify modifiable risk factors for unintentional falls and cutting or piercing injures at home among the age group of interest .

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  • Tree-ring analysis of kauri (Agathis australis) timbers from a partially demolished house, 6 Stokes Road, Mt Eden, Auckland City.

    Boswijk, Ingrid (2012)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Tree-ring analysis of sub-fossil kauri (Agathis australis) from Verberne Farm, Korariwhero Flat, Dargaville, Northland.

    Boswijk, Ingrid; Palmer, J (2012)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This is a technical archive report describing crossdating and chronology development of tree-ring samples from Verberne Farm, Korariwhero Flat, near Dargaville. Please note that although the tree-ring dates presented here will not change, it is possible that interpretation of the results may change as new evidence comes to light.

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  • Forest Health News: Eucalypt pest gum leaf skeletoniser reaches the central North Island

    Withers, TM; Gresham, B; Avila Olesen, Gonzalo (2014-10)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Maniapoto Upper Waipa River Fisheries Plan

    Rawiri-Watene, E; Kukutai, J; Morgan, G; Neha, E; Fisher, K; Neha, T; Tapara, C; Hikuroa, Daniel; Stockman, P; Searancke, G; Bryant, K; Neha, B (2014-12-01)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Maniapoto Fish Plan was developed by the Maniapoto Fisheries Reference Group through a series of workshops held at Te Keeti Marae in Otorohanga. The plan provides for the protection, restoration and enhancement of the fisheries resources of the Waipa River catchment. To Maniapoto, the Waipa River is a single indivisible entity that flows from Pekepeke to its confluence with the Waikato River and includes its waters, banks, bed (and all minerals under it) and its streams, waterways, tributaries, lakes, fisheries, vegetation, floodplains, wetlands, islands, springs, geothermal springs, water column, airspace and substratum as well as its metaphysical elements with its own mauri. Waiwaia is the spiritual guardian of the Waipa River and the importance of Waiwaia to Maniapoto is boundless. The Waipa River, through Waiwaia, provides for its people the necessary instruments of life. The Waipa River, its tributaries, wetlands and springs are interwoven into the fabric of the Maniapoto people and their identity, tikanga, reo and wellbeing. This sense of wellbeing and connectedness to the awa is reflected in the Plan.

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  • Integrating Public Input into Political Leadership: an initial research report

    Lees-Marshment, Jennifer (2012-11-30)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • State of our Gulf 2014 Hauraki Gulf - Tikapa Moana/ Te Moananui a Toi State of the Environment Report 2014

    Kelly, S; Sim-Smith, C; Faire, S; Pierre, J; Hikuroa, Daniel (2014-09-01)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report is prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Act (2000). It follows on from the 2011 State of our Gulf Report, which highlighted the incredible transformation the Hauraki Gulf had undergone within the last two human lifespans. Over that period a number of native terrestrial species were driven to extinction, native forests and vast wetlands were cleared and replaced with pastoral land, sediment eroded from the land reduced water quality and muddied the Gulf’s estuaries, ecologically important marine habitats were destroyed, populations of fished species were depleted, and urban development led to the loss, modification and contamination of the coast. Most of the indicators examined in 2011 suggested that the Gulf was continuing to experience ongoing environmental degradation, and/or that resources were continuing to be lost or suppressed at environmentally low levels. In response, the Hauraki Gulf Forum developed a strategic framework for action and urged agencies to work collectively on making urgent progress in the following areas: R: A regenerating network of marine protected areas and island sanctuaries. E: Enhancement of fisheries with improved environmental outcomes. M: Mana whenua relationships reflected in resource management practice. A: Active land management to minimise inputs of sediments, nutrients and contaminants. K: Knowledge utilisation within an ecosystem-based management framework. This update re-examines the state of the Gulf and considers progress toward integrated management and the strategic outcomes sought by the Forum.

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