2,268 results for Report, All rights reserved

  • A Bayesian approach to norm identification

    Cranefield, Stephen; Meneguzzi, Felipe; Oren, Nir; Savarimuthu, Bastin Tony Roy (2015)

    Report
    University of Otago

    When entering a system, an agent should be aware of the obligations and prohibitions (collectively norms) that will affect it. Existing solutions to this norm identification problem make use of observations of either other's norm compliant, or norm violating, behaviour. However, they assume an extreme situation where norms are typically violated, or complied with. In this paper we propose a Bayesian approach to norm identification which operates by learning from both norm compliant and norm violating behaviour. By utilising both types of behaviour, we not only overcome a major limitation of existing approaches, but also obtain improved performance over the state-of-the-art, allowing norms to be learned with a few observations. We evaluate the effectiveness of this approach empirically and discuss theoretical limitations to its accuracy.

    View record details
  • Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks of New Zealand: A reference volume of lithology, age and paleoenvironments with maps (PMAPs) and database.

    Kamp, Peter J.J.; Vincent, Kirsty A.; Tayler, Michael J.S. (2015)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This volume presents descriptive geological data and text about each Cenozoic sedimentary and volcanic geological unit to formation and member level (in some cases) exposed on land in New Zealand, including their lithology, stratigraphic age and inferred environment of deposition or emplacement. These data are illustrated as two types of PMAPS: a present-day paleoenvironment map of New Zealand; and as restored paleoenvironment maps, one for each million years from 65 Ma to the present. These information and data underpin the development of a new Cenozoic paleogeographical model of New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Planning a safe city for women

    Brewster, Karen E. (1994)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 256 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geography.

    View record details
  • The Computation of Key Properties of Markov Chains via Perturbations

    Hunter, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Computational procedures for the stationary probability distribution, the group inverse of the Markovian kernel and the mean first passage times of a finite irreducible Markov chain, are developed using perturbations. The derivation of these expressions involves the solution of systems of linear equations and, structurally, inevitably the inverses of matrices. By using a perturbation technique, starting from a simple base where no such derivations are formally required, we update a sequence of matrices, formed by linking the solution procedures via generalized matrix inverses and utilising matrix and vector multiplications. Four different algorithms are given, some modifications are discussed, and numerical comparisons made using a test example. The derivations are based upon the ideas outlined in Hunter, J.J., “The computation of stationary distributions of Markov chains through perturbations”, Journal of Applied Mathematics and Stochastic Analysis, 4, 29-46, (1991).

    View record details
  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

    View record details
  • Why the Kemeny Time is Constant

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    We present a new fundamental intuition for why the Kemeny feature of a Markov chain is a constant. This new perspective has interesting further implications.

    View record details
  • On the Edge: Shifting Teachers’ Paradigms for the Future

    Gilbert, J; Bull, A

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This project was designed to explore the conditions needed for New Zealand teachers to experience the transformational learning we argue is needed for future-oriented schooling. Its focus was teachers’ thinking. The research looked at how a group of teachers’ thinking changed as they participated in a professional learning and development (PLD) programme. This PLD had two parts: a university course on educational futures, and a workshop designed to support cognitive growth.

    View record details
  • Evaluating a Shared Spaces Intervention. A Case Study of Street Users in Auckland, New Zealand

    Oliver, M; Badland, HM; Duncan, S; Wooller, L; Wright, R; Miner-Williams, W

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    The environmental qualities of urban spaces have the potential to influence peoples’ behaviours, including mode of transport and physical activity patterns, shopper spending habits, and social engagement and behavioural characteristics. Increasingly, urban planners and transport engineers are integrating concepts such as self -­‐ explaining roads and shared spaces into environmental design approaches, for improved driver behaviour, pedestrian safety, and health behaviours. Despite this, research focusing on the effects of such interventions is limited, largely due to the substantial expense of implementing built environment infrastructure, and a general disconnect between researchers and regulatory bodies responsible for intervention implementation. Greater focu s needs to be on understanding the effects these interventions can have on the general population, to inform future infrastructural initiatives and investment. This study compares the profiles and perceptions of street users immediately post and sixteen mo nths after a major streetscape upgrade to a shared spaces mode in the the Fort Street precinct (central business district), in Auckland, New Zealand. A convenience sample strategy was employed for data collection and participants completed in -­‐ person survey s . Descriptive data treatment and inferential statistical analyses were undertaken to compare user profiles and opinions pre and post streetscape upgrades. In total , 373 street users in the Fort Street precinct participated in this research. Overall, findi ngs indicate positive perceptions of the Fort Street upgrades and positive impacts on health -­‐ related behaviours. Recommendations for further improvements to the area predominantly focused on improving pedestrian safety, including reducing traffic speeds, r educing car usage of the area, and providing better clarity on appropriate driver behaviours.

    View record details
  • Networks of support for Māori mental health: The response and recovery of Tangata Whaiora through the Ōtautahi earthquakes

    Lambert, Simon J.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report presents the experiences of Tangata Whaiora (Mental health clients) through the disastrous earthquakes that struck Otautahi/Christchurch in 2010-11. It further analysis these experience to how show the social networks these individuals, their whānau, supporting staff respond and recover to a significant urban disaster. The disaster challenged the mental health of those individuals who are impacted and the operations of organisations and networks that support and care for the mentally ill. How individuals and their families navigate a post-disaster landscape provides an unfortunate but unique opportunity to analyse how these support networks respond to severe disruption. Tangata Whaiora possess experiences of micro-scale personal and family disasters and were not necessarily shocked by the loss of normality in Ōtautahi as a result of the earthquakes. The organic provision of clear leadership, outstanding commitment by staff, and ongoing personal and institutional dedication in the very trying circumstances of working in a post-disaster landscape all contributed to Te Awa o te Ora’s notable response to the disaster.

    View record details
  • News, Politics and Diversity in the 2014 New Zealand General Election

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

    View record details
  • Challenges and Recommendations for the Design and Conduct of Global Software Engineering Courses: A Systematic Review

    Beecham, S; Clear, T; Barr, J; Noll, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This SLR we are conducting traverses the many options available to Computer Science (CS) educators teaching CS courses involving global collaboration. The challenges and solutions in conducting global software engineering courses will be addressed. While there is a rich source of literature covering this topic, there is limited consolidated guidance available for CS educators wishing to implement a global course, in collaboration with other institutions. So building upon the existing knowledge in the literature in the area will help to produce a report that will serve as a broad ranging resource for global software engineering educators. The SLR focusses on two areas: 1. Learning GSE Theory: Developing courses based on GSE theory. I.e. How to teach students about developing software across multi-site teams (to include things like cultural training – i.e. how to build trust amongst a team that hasn’t met face to face, etc.). AND 2. Learning GSE by doing: Developing courses that show how to apply GSE methods in the classroom. E.g. where students develop software in multi-site teams (where the software developed is not really the focus, but ‘how’ to develop the software is what we would be looking at). We also include studies that take a hybrid approach by including a combination of theory and practice. I.e. research that presents experiences of running hybrid courses aimed at developing student capabilities in working as global professionals which have varying degrees of cross-site collaboration, and theorypractice balance.

    View record details
  • The Te Hoe Shore Whaling Station Artefact Assemblage

    Harris, Jaden; Smith, Ian (2005-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report presents an analysis of the Te Hoe Shore Whaling Station artefact assemblage, exclusive of faunal remains, wood and charcoal. The Te Hoe site, located on the East Coast of the North Island of New Zealand, was excavated in January/February 2005 as part of a larger project investigating early European communities in New Zealand. Shore whaling was a prominent extractive industry in New Zealand in the 1830s and 1840s and in many areas whalers were the first European settlers to arrive in this country. The primary aim in documenting their material culture is to get a more detailed picture of how whalers adapted to life in New Zealand, and to understand what influences if any they had on the subsequent development of European settlement. To this end the present paper attempts to give detailed descriptive analysis of the artefacts and place them within both a spatial and temporal context.

    View record details
  • Artefacts from the Oashore Shore Whaling Station

    Harris, Jaden; Smith, Ian (2005-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report presents an analysis of the artefactual assemblage from the Oashore whaling station and is largely a revision of a work originally submitted as a Masters Thesis (Harris 2005). Shore whaling was a brutally efficient industry for a short period in the 1830s and 1840s and represents some of the earliest European settlement in New Zealand. The excavation of the Oashore whaling station, located on Banks Peninsula, South Island of New Zealand, in January/February 2004 represents the first part of a major research orientated project on shore whaling in New Zealand. The present paper aims to document the range of material culture available to the Oashore whalers to help shed some light on what life was like for a shore whaler and to investigate how these communities compare or contrast with other contemporaneous European sites. To this end the Oashore artefactual material, exclusive of faunal remains and charcoal or wood, has been described, quantified, and dated where possible.

    View record details
  • Excavations at the Oashore Whaling Station: (M37/162) Banks Peninsula January–February 2004

    Smith, Ian; Prickett, Nigel (2006)

    Report
    University of Otago

    View record details
  • Excavations at Te Hoe Mahia Peninsula

    Smith, Ian; Prickett, Nigel (2008-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    View record details
  • Meat Weight, Nutritional and Energy Yield Values for New Zealand Archaeofauna

    Smith, Ian (2011-01)

    Report
    University of Otago

    View record details
  • Codfish Island/Whenua Hou Archaeological Project: Preliminary Report

    Smith, Ian; Anderson, Atholl (2007-08)

    Report
    University of Otago

    View record details
  • Data for an Archaeozoological Analysis of Marine Resource Use in Two New Zealand Study Areas (Revised edition)

    Smith, Ian; James-Lee, Tiffany (2010-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

    View record details
  • Fishing activity in the Waikato and Waipa rivers

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Allan, Dave G.; Kilgour, Jonathan T.; Watene-Rawiri, Erina M.; Stichbury, Glen; Walsh, Cameron (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this research project is to collate information regarding the recent use of fisheries resources in the Waikato River and Waipa River catchment areas. In particular, the project sought to summarise the commercial, customary, and recreational fishing activity in the catchments of the Waikato and Waipa rivers in the spatial context of recently introduced co-governance areas. These fisheries include, but are not exclusive to, the broad range of aquatic life managed under the Fisheries Act 1996. Such information is required to support management which includes a co-management framework. The research describes the commercial, customary and recreational fisheries including species and quantities taken, fishing methods, and seasonal influences.

    View record details
  • Barrett Bush management plan

    Bryan, Catherine Louise (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The current vegetation pattern of Barrett Bush is the result of complex landscape changes of both recent and historic times. The most recent natural landscape changes occurred as the Waikato River meandered across the region, changing course over many years and depositing the alluvial plain that Barrett Bush grows on. More recent landscape changes have been the result of human activity as vegetation clearance and agricultural development has occurred throughout the district. Fortunately, Barrett Bush was set aside and the reserve now provides insight into original vegetation patterns as well as a refuge for biota characteristic of forests dominated by kahikatea. Barrett Bush sits a shallow depression of an alluvial plain with a podocarp vegetation composition that is classed as a kahikatea semi-swamp forest (Clarkson et al. 2007). Clarkson et al. (2007) describe the typical natural vegetation of kahikatea semi-swamp forest: “Semi-swamp forest dominated by kahikatea grew on the poorly drained shallow depressions. Several other species were present in varying amounts, including rimu, matai, pukatea, swamp maire, tawa, pokaka, and occasional cabbage tree. Prominent in the understorey were silver fern, mapou, hangehange, Coprosma areolata, and turepo, and sedges including Hymenophyllum demissum, hen and chicken fern, Astelia fragrans, A. grandis, and Microlaena avenacea.”

    View record details