1,729 results for Report, Modify

  • Leading in Collaborative, Complex Education Systems

    Gilbert, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • New Zealanders with Disabilities and their Internet Use

    Smith, P

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report presents the findings from a series of interviews conducted with New Zealanders with disabilities who talked about their experiences of Internet use. For people with disabilities in New Zealand, living in the digital age has much wider implications when it comes to their access and accessibility. This report presents the findings from interviews conducted with 11 New Zealanders with a range of disabilities about their Internet use. A description of the study design is outlined in Section One, followed by the presentation of the findings of the research in Section Two. These findings look at firstly, how the participants engage in certain strategies to enable their Internet use in relation to their disability or impairment; secondly, the various online activities they like to participate in; thirdly, the range of barriers they have encountered in their Internet use; and, fourthly, participants’ attitudes towards the Internet and how it has impacted on their lives in terms of technology and independence, identity and socialisation. The conclusion in Section Three reflects upon the findings of the research, offers recommendations and makes suggestions for future research

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  • The Internet in New Zealand 2013

    Gibson, A; Miller, M; Smith, P; Bell, A; Crothers, C (2013-12-16)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Executive Summary The fourth survey of the World Internet Project New Zealand (WIPNZ) was conducted between late July and early September 2013. For the first time, the sample in 2013 used both telephone and internet surveys. This report presents an analysis of the usage of and attitudes to the internet of the resulting sample of 2006 New Zealanders. As internet use approaches saturation in New Zealand, our focus turns from ‘how many people use the internet?’ to ‘how do people use the internet?’ and ‘why do some not use the internet at all?’ To answer these questions, the sample has been divided into five categories: never-users (5% of sample), ex-users (3%), low level users (14%), first generation users (40%) and next generation users (38%). Usage For a large number of people the internet is used daily. Four out of five spend an hour or more online at home every day. Almost everyone under 40 is online, so that only 1% of our under-40 sample are non-users. Accessing the internet ‘on the go’ is prevalent. Seven out of ten users access the internet from a hand-held mobile device such as a smartphone or an iPad. Almost half of the internet users surveyed (48%) said that they had accessed the internet through a tablet, while an even higher proportion (68%) connected through their mobile phone in the past year. Activities Most internet users say they surf or browse the web (96%) or visit social networking sites (81%). 34% of internet users report that they use the cloud, 41% purchase apps and almost two thirds (65%) download free apps. Most users check their email daily (89%). Just over 60% of men aged 30–44 said they have looked at sites with sexual content. Māori and Pasifika internet users, especially those in lower income households, take the lead in subscriptions to music streaming services like Spotify. More than one in five Māori (21%) and Pasifika (23%) users in households with annual incomes of less than $50,000 have paid for a subscription to a music streaming service in the past year. The internet is used as a tool for consumer decision making, with 94% of users looking for information about products online – more than half of users do this at least weekly. For 85% of users, this kind of online research includes comparing prices. Almost half of our users (47%) have logged in to secure areas on Government or Council websites, and 51% have paid taxes, fines or licences online in the past year. Comparing the importance of media Comparing the importance of various forms of media as information sources, 81% of all our respondents rated the internet (including online media such as streamed radio) as important or very important. This was very much higher than the proportion who rated offline media as important: television (47%), radio (37%) and newspapers (37%). One of the most dramatic differences according to age group is the importance of the internet as a source of entertainment and leisure. While watching (offline) television is an important leisure activity for people across all ages, using the internet as a form of entertainment is a young-person phenomenon: 80% of respondents aged 16–29 rate it as important or very important. This 2013 survey has a different sample structure than previous years in order to include New Zealanders without a landline. The questionnaire has also undergone substantial updating to keep pace with changing digital technologies. For these reasons, the present report focuses solely on the findings for 2013, and longitudinal analyses will be presented in a subsequent report next year.

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  • Data fitness for use in research on alien and invasive species

    McGeoch, M; Groom, QJ; Pagad, Shyama; Petrosyan, V; Wilson, J; Ruiz, G (2016)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The discovery, access and appropriate use of primary biodiversity data are critical for alien and invasive species (A&IS) research at continental, regional, country and subnational scales. Sustainable, reliable, timely, and accessible data on A&IS is essential to the long-term management of this key threat to biodiversity, including the ability of countries to meet the Honolulu Challenge and to achieve Aichi Target 9 of the CBD Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020. GBIF provides a range of essential information services for A&IS researchers, including but not limited to taxonomic and occurrence information. After broad consultation with the research and A&IS community, a suite of recommendations were identified under five broad topic areas: 1) Strategic approaches, 2) Improving existing data, 3) Expanding information content, 4) Functionality, and 5) Communication and engagement. Several recommendations are relevant for other data users, but the availability, quality and timeliness of these data are especially critical for A&IS because of the real-world consequences resulting from the negative impacts of biological invasions. Alien species occurrence includes taxonomically verified species presence records or absence information at a locality with a geographic coordinate, or in a prescribed area, such as a management or geopolitical unit or site (Latombe et al. 2016). Alien species occurrence information is the single most important variable necessary to support research, monitoring and management of A&IS.

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  • The involvement of the directors in stategic management in New Zealand's ten largest companies

    Paddy, Rex (1983)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper arose out of my previous work "The Role of the Board of Directors in Ensuring the Involvement of key influence figures in Strategic Management")The motivation remained one of how to implement the process of Strategic Management at the most senior levels of major Public Companies. The technology is well documented, the buzz words have slipped easily into Chairmans' reports and my previous research indicated an almost total acceptance of the philosophy of Strategic Management by the directors of New Zealand's ten largest Public Companies. This current research was designed to determine if a gap existed between the theory as accepted by the directors and the practice in the companies they controlled. However, what was being measured was still the directors own perceptions of the degree of their involvement in Strategic Management. In an attempt to balance this, identical questionnaires were sent to each Company Secretary and the senior executive responsible for planning. I also had serious doubts whether the respondants ascribed the same meaning to the terminology of Strategic Management as the academic writers and I therefore interviewed two of the Chairmen to attempt to measure their depth of understanding of the Strategic Management process. This was an extremely valuable input to my understanding and also provided essential insights into the practical functionings of the board room.

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  • The role of the board of directors in ensuring the involvment of key influence figures in strategic management

    Paddy, Rex (1981)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Problem Stated - 'How to involve the most senior decision makers in a regular strategic appraisal which results in a written strategy capable of guiding all major decisions of the company'. Since the early 1960's the basic concepts of corporate planning, strategic planning or strategic management have been well documented in both the academic and popular literature. The theory has not changed a great deal although the language used to express the theory has changed, the timespan has shortened (oil crisis) and the amount of quantification has decreased.

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  • An evaluation of sample adequacy for the Lapita-style ceramic assemblages from three sites located in the Reef/Santa Cruz group, Outer Eastern Islands of the Solomons.

    Green, R. C. Roger Curtis 1932- (2009)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Emeritus Professor Roger Green is an archaeologist in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Auckland. His interests include the anthropological history of the Pacific derived from detailed study of the archaeology, linguistics and ethnography of the region developed over 50 years of research. The Reef/Santa Cruz Lapita sites discussed in this volume were excavated by Roger Green as part of the Southeast Solomons Culture History project in the early 1970s. These three sites were, and continue to be, central to the development of our understanding of the Lapita phenomenon, situated as they are in the first island group east of the Near/Remote Oceania boundary. Given their status these key sites have been the focus of considerable review and debate. This volume provides commentary on aspects of that debate, and makes available detailed analysis of variation in ceramic decorative motifs which is used in the support of a model of chronological change and continuity for these sites.

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  • Normal humanness, change and power in human assisted reproductive technology: an analysis of the written public submissions to the New Zealand Parliamentary Health Committee in 2003

    Park, Julie, 1947; McLauchlan, Laura; Frengley, Elizabeth (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Assisted human reproduction legislation has provoked wide-ranging debate in all those societies that have enacted it. New Zealand is no exception. The public submissions to the Parliamentary Health Committee on the Human Assisted Reproductive Technologies (HART) Bill and Supplementary Order Paper 80 provided an opportunity to consider how those who wrote submissions conceptualised important aspects of being human. Using an anthropological discourse analysis approach, the authors analysed the New Zealand submissions. One reviewer comments: “The work provides important further information on the wider topic of cultural understandings of innovative technologies in New Zealand society”; another wrote “contemporary, contentious and of great public concern ... it opens up the topic for further research”. The public submissions made to the Parliamentary Health Committee on the Human Assisted Reproductive Technologies (HART) Bill and Supplementary Order Paper 80 are analysed in this report. Within this corpus, five major themes are identified: normality, humanness, natural versus social constructs, moral decline, and rights and power. The report is organised on the basis of these overlapping themes. Running throughout these five very general themes were two major discourses: one Christian-identified; the other, medical-scientific. A minor discourse of disability rights was also present. Many submissions, from all three of the modes of discourse, expressed fear that assisted human reproductive (AHR) technologies were challenging the boundaries of normality. AHR technologies were seen in many submissions as potentially opening a door to eugenics and the commodification of humans. Such submissions often requested the establishment of more strict regulatory frameworks. The natural order lying behind kinship relations was seen to be greatly challenged by AHR in some submissions, particularly those which were Christianidentified. Many such submissions viewed the HART legislation as part of a general moral decline of society. While some submissions viewed AHR technology as distinctly unnatural, others asserted the naturalness of the human use and development of technology. The desire to have children was cast as natural throughout the submissions. The right of offspring to know their origins emerged as a key issue. Questions of whether the production of children was a right or a privilege, and whether AHR was a constraint or a support, also emerged from the submissions. Adherence to human rights was seen as fundamental within the submissions, with differing conclusions about the correct use of AHR technologies, influenced by whether the authors viewed personhood as being established at conception or at some later developmental stage. Placing our research into an international context, we note that the limited use of scientific (both social and bio-medical) evidence within the New Zealand debates contrasts greatly with the extensive use of such evidence within British Parliamentary debates. Other aspects of the submissions appear to be unique to New Zealand, including the emphasis upon the importance of whakapapa (genealogy) in the establishment of identity.

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  • Multiplying and dividing: tuberculosis in Canada and Aotearoa New Zealand

    Littleton, Judith; Park, Julie, 1947; Herring, Ann, 1951; Farmer, Tracy (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This is an edited volume. Part 1, comprising six articles, addresses dimensions of contemporary public health approaches to TB, Part 2, comprising five articles, analyses historical policies that contributed to disproportionately high levels of TB among indigenous people in both nations, and Part 3, five articles, presents experiencenear accounts of individuals, families and communities coping with TB in daily life. The individual studies speak to the power of ethnography and ethnohistory in analysing infectious disease and the societies in which it exists. Multiplying and Dividing brings together the work of two multi-disciplinary research groups located in Canada and New Zealand who discovered that they were working along similar lines in their research on historical and contemporary tuberculosis in their respective countries. The volume, the outcome of a joint workshop in Canada in 2006, shows the multiple realities that make up the experience of TB for nations, communities, and individuals. Tb can divide communities, but in some circumstances unites them in a quest for eradication. The social and epidemiological research undertaken into TB exposes social divisions and inequalities in these two postcolonial societies

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  • Usability and Mental Models of Google and PRIMO in the Context of an Academic Tertiary Library

    Wilkinson, Elizabeth Helen (2009)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Library websites and search tools are a crucial interface between the user, the organisation and its resources. Most users now have easy access to other sources of information via the Internet, such as Google, and studies show the vast majority are using these in preference to library resources. The information architecture of library search tools is unfamiliar to users and is believed to constitute a barrier to usability. This is an industry-critical issue. Products have recently become available based on decoupled architecture, where the library management system is dis-integrated from the user discovery interface. One of these products is Ex Libris’ PRIMO, termed LibrarySearch at the time of this project by the University of Auckland Library, an academic tertiary library. The researcher used qualitative methods in order to gain an understanding of users’ starter frameworks and information-seeking behaviour in the contexts of mental models, usability and sense-making. The purpose was to raise providers’ awareness of their own and students’ mental models and the disparities between them, with a view to closing gaps from the providers’ side. Results indicate there is potential to improve web design, teaching, reference and other explanatory material.

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  • Federated Searching and diverse subject areas in academic tertiary libraries: a study at database level

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Searching online databases is a task tertiary students are commonly required to undertake when completing their academic work, and can often be a somewhat tedious process. Federated searching products appear to mitigate the tedium of this process by reducing the number of times a search needs to be repeated. This study aims to investigate the information needs of undergraduate history and medical students, what type of search results they prefer and their attitudes to the concept of a federated search engine. Twelve students were interviewed, six from each subject. A semi-structured interview method was used for data collection. Results showed that the information needs of both groups of students are similar, as are the techniques they use to conduct and refine their searches. There was no correlation between the subject studied and the type of results preferred (specific or broad), but significant differences were found in the attitudes of the two groups of students to a federated search product. Implications of these findings on the suitability of a federated search in a tertiary academic library setting are discussed, along with the implications these findings have for information literacy. Suggestions are made for further research.

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  • The distribution of Mixing Times in Markov Chains

    Hunter, JJ (2012-01-20)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    The distribution of the “mixing time” or the “time to stationarity” in a discrete time irreducible Markov chain, starting in state i, can be defined as the number of trials to reach a state sampled from the stationary distribution of the Markov chain. Expressions for the probability generating function, and hence the probability distribution of the mixing time starting in state i are derived and special cases explored. This extends the results of the author regarding the expected time to mixing [J.J. Hunter, Mixing times with applications to perturbed Markov chains, Linear Algebra Appl. 417 (2006) 108–123], and the variance of the times to mixing, [J.J. Hunter, Variances of first passage times in a Markov chain with applications to mixing times, Linear Algebra Appl. 429 (2008) 1135–1162]. Some new results for the distribution of recurrence and first passage times in three-state Markov chain are also presented.

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  • Wijsman hyperspaces: subspaces and embeddings

    Cao, J; Junnila, H; Moors, W (2012-03-29)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this paper, topological properties of Wijsman hyperspaces are investigated. We study the existence of isolated points in Wijsman hyperspaces. We show that every Tychonoff space can be embedded as a closed subspace in the Wijsman hyperspace of a complete metric space which is locally R.

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  • Protecting Civilians in an Urban Conflict Lessons Learned from Australia’s Deployment Following the Timor Leste Crisis 2006-2007

    Powles, AR; Cox, B

    Report
    Massey University

    The protection of civilians in urban conflict environments is a dynamic of contemporary peacekeeping operations which has received far less attention than it deserves. Urban zones are fast becoming the new territories of conflict and violence and this, what has been termed, the “new military urbanism”, is recognised within contemporary military doctrine1 as a defining feature of modern warfare and armed conflict. However, inadequate consideration of the implications of urban epicentres of conflict on the protection of civilians has been given in the context of peacekeeping operations. The specific characteristics and dynamics of violence generated by an urban environment create unique challenges for the protection of civilians and have considerable implications for how peacekeepers implement protection of civilian mandates.

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  • A History of Biology at Auckland University 1883-1983

    Foster, Brian; Rattenbury, Jack; Marbrook, John (1983)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Items in ResearchSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. Previously published items are made available in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. In the 100 years of the University of Auckland there have been five generations of biology professors: 1) Thomas 2) Johnson 3) Lancaster - McGregor 4) Chapman - Morton - Matthews 5) Love11 - Young - Bergquist. Staff members have risen from one in 1883 to 42 in 1983. There have been 100 intakes of first year students in biology; 11 in 1883, 405 in 1983. Of the degrees that have been conferred, 1700 students have majored in Botany, Zoology or Cell Biology for baccalaureates, 493 have taken masterates, and 123 doctorates have been conferred.

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  • The Mokohinau Islands : a marine survey : with additional notes on the history, climate and terrestrial environments of the group

    Berben, P.H.; McCrone, A. (1988)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Because of the isolated location of the Mokohinaus, and the difficulty of gaining access to the islands, few detailed quantitative surveys have been attempted, especially of the marine biota. The Royal New Zealand Air Force conducted a diving expedition to Mokohinaus in 1978, as part of their expedition training programme. Lead by Wing Commander Knight, the RNZAF made their main object a marine survey around Burgess Island, the largest island of the Mokohinau group. The impetus for producing this report stems from their pioneering expedition, and I would like to congratulate all members of the expedition on the way that they, as non-biologists, applied themselves to this unfamiliar task. Advice on conducting the marine survey was provided by Dr Bill Ballantine from the Leigh Marine Laboratory, assisted by Drs Tony Ayling and Floor Anthoni. As well as supervising the mapping effort by the Air Force divers, these three each carried out individual projects, the results of which are reproduced in this report: Dr Ballantine carried out a baseline survey of rocky intertidal shores, Dr Ayling made a census of fish populations, and Dr Anthoni kept a photographic record of the whole operation (which was subsequently made into a scientific and public education film). One of the major tasks to be done at the completion of the expedition was to produce a map of the underwater habitats. This was done over several years by student assistants at the Leigh Marine Laboratory, particularly Susan Owen. I thank her for her efforts, and also the many other people who helped at various stages in the production of this report, particularly Neil Andrew, Brigid Kerrigan, Laura Stocker and Jane Robertson. Our input into the production of this report was mainly supervisory; all the hard work was done by Peter Berben and Anne McCrone. We are extremely grateful to them for their enthusiasm and perseverance in gathering, sorting and writing up the information. It is hoped that their efforts will help to increase our awar2ness of the Mokohinaus, and will stimulate others to carry out further quantitative studies of this unique island group.

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  • Marine sponges : forty-six sponges of northern New Zealand

    Pritchard, K.; Battershill, C.N.; Ward, V.; Bergquist, P.R. (1984)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Sponges are invertebrates and form the only phylum, Porifera, in the subkingdom Parazoa. They are the most primitive of multicellular animals, having neither true tissues nor organs, with the cells showing considerable independence from one another. A sponge is composed of a variety of cells supported by a skeletal network. The skeleton can be composed of spicules and/or spongin. The various cell components perform different functions. The outer surface (pinacoderm) is formed of flattened polygonal cells called pinacocytes. The interior surface (choanoderm) is lined with flagellated collar cells (choanocytes); the flagella beat to provide a current through the sponge enabling oxygen and food particles to be drawn into the sponge and wastes to be expelled. Between the pinacoderm and the choanoderm is an area (the mesohyl) formed of gelatinous material. Cells found here are the basic archaeocytes which can form into any other specialised cell. The body form of sponges is very variable, being influenced by available space, current velocity, habitat, and the nature and slope of the substrate. Asconoid sponges have the simplest form - a tubular shape enclosing a central cavity which opens out through a single exhalent opening (osculum) with porocytes connecting directly from the pinacoderm to the choanoderm. Larger sponges require a more efficient filter system: this is achieved by folding which increases the internal surface area. Syconoid sponges are those with the first stages of body wall folding. Leuconoid sponges have the highest degree of folding, with the formation of flagellated chambers and a complex canal system, the filling in of the central cavity and numerous oscules. The majority of sponges fall into this category. Sponges seem to be unselective feeders: their diet reflects the composition of particles available in the water current, the only criteria being particles smaller than the sieve size of the inhalent openings. Reproduction can be by either sexual or asexual means. Some sponge species contain both male and female sex cells, other species can have different sexes on a permanent or temporary basis. In oviparous sponges eggs are extruded through the exhalent opening, or upon dissolution of the dermal membrane. Viviparous types expel tiny adult sponges or larvae. The larvae usually spend a short time as a free swimming form before settling on the substratum. Asexual forms of reproduction are by budding or splitting. In some species asexual bodies (gemmules) are formed. There are approximately 10,000 species of sponges recorded from around the world.

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  • Marine molluscs. Part 1. Amphineura, archaeogastropoda & pulmonata

    Walsby, J.; Ballantine, W.J.; Morton, J.; Willen, R.C. (1982)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The creation of New Zealand's first marine reserve, between Cape Rodney and Okakari Point, on the eastern coast of Northland, near Leigh, has been a stimulus to review and collate all of the known information on a number of animal groups. The marine molluscs constitute a large group which will be covered in 4 volumes. In this, the first volume, the more primitive molluscs, nearly all grazers, are considered. These are the Amphineura (chitons), the Archaeogastropoda (limpets, topshells, turbanshells, nerites and allies), and the marine Pulmonata (3 limpets, the small earshells, Amphibola the mud snail, and a strangely isolated pulmonate slug, Onahidella). Shells have long captivated man's interest with their beauty of form and decoration and have been the subject of many books and countless illustrations. Even for New Zealand shells there are a good number of books ranging from pocket guides to the common shells, through to the complete manuals of Suter (1913) and Powell (1979). Few countries can be so fortunate as to have such a modern account as A.W.B. Powell's "New Zealand Mollusca", in which we are given a complete list, with descriptions and illustrations of our marine, land and freshwater molluscs. The generation after Suter's, extending well into modern time, was marked by intensified discovery and new description, with a proliferation of local generic names. Today there has been a return to a healthier balance, with the recognition that exclusive neozelanic, generic names can obscure a wide comparability which is so useful in community ecology and comparative morphology. Powell's "New Zealand Mollusca" emphasised this corrective trend and its revised nomenclature is not likely to become substantially out of date during this century. New records are certain to appear, however, both by discovery, aided in particular by the use of SCUBA studies, and also by immigration. Much bigger and faster ships and periodic international movement of giant oil-drilling rigs, have given new opportunities for the dispersal of marine species across the oceans. It was only by the appearance of Powell's great general work, that smaller books of more limited aim, and-specialised purpose, could be encouraged or become feasible to produce. "New Zealand Mollusca ll is based mainly on characters of the shells of the entire New Zealand molluscan fauna. In matters of taxonomy, our local series will follow it throughout, diverging only in a few well-advised instances, largely in higher group classification, where malacological and evolutionary study has proved informative.

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  • Brachyura and crab-like anomura of New Zealand

    McLay, C.L. (1988)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Crab-1ike marine arthropods are among the most advanced forms of crustaceans. They have a well developed carapace, usually wider than long, short bodies with the abdomen folded underneath as a segmented flap and the first pair of pereiopods chelate. These sometimes fearsome-looking appendages often deter people from handling them but in fact most crabs are easily manipulated once you overcome the initial fear of being bitten. Perhaps this aversion is the reason why there still remains much to be discovered about crabs. Most crabs cannot inflict any sort of damage to a human but those which can are easily handled after a bit of trial and error. The words of Thomson (1932) are probably equally applicable today: ' ... the sea, which teems with animal and vegetable life, and with unrealized sources of national wealth, has hitherto received very little attention. In this general neglect of marine biology the Crustatea have shared. The number of workers who have added to our knowledge of this group is very small ... ' The predatory, commensal and mutualistic relationships of crabs with other marine animals, their reproductive and population dynamics and their importance as members of marine communities are fascinating to the marine ecologist. Various aspects of crab behaviour, burrowing, sound production, masking and foraging are intriguing to the animal behaviourist. Physiological adaptations of their osmotic balance, respiration and ventilation, hormonal control of moulting, autotomy and regeneration of lost limbs, and their highly organised nervous systems are exciting to physiologists. The reasons for the apparently low genetic diversity of crustaceans provides a challenge to geneticists. For the great majority of New Zealand crabs we have barely even begun to scratch the surface of the wide range of studies that are possible.

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  • About the Ocean Biogeographic Information System

    Costello M.J.; Stocks K.; Zhang Y.; Grassle J.F.; Fautin D.G. (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This document is a web page archive of the text first published on the website of the Ocean Biogeographic Information System http://www.iobis.org in April 2007.

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