87 results for Report, Modify

  • Children in Care

    Atwool, Nicola (2010)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • Leading in Collaborative, Complex Education Systems

    Gilbert, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • University of Otago Open Access Publishing Survey Results (including Maori ethnicity results)

    White, Richard; Remy, Melanie (2017-05-24)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Abstract: Researchers at the University of Otago are ambivalent about Open Access: in principle they strongly support open access to research literature but their behaviours are driven by the practicalities of cost and publication venue. This document reports the results of a survey carried out in 2015 of University of Otago researchers as to their attitudes towards and behaviours in relation to open access publishing. This version of the report includes a sub-analysis of respondents who selected Maori ethnicity. The original version of the report without this sub-analysis is available via OUR Archive at http://hdl.handle.net/10523/6947 The project page for more information, such as the questions used and the anonymised raw data, is available at https://figshare.com/projects/University_of_Otago_Open_Access_Publishing_Survey_2015-16/17216

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  • Fa'atuatuaga Kerisiano ma Sauaga i totonu o Aiga: Ripoti mo Tagata Lautele o Samoa i Niusila

    Ah Sir-Maliko, Mercy (2016-08)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is available in both English and Samoan

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  • Christian Faith and Family Violence: A Report for Samoan communities in New Zealand

    Ah Siu-Maliko, Mercy (2016-08)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The report is available in both English and Samoan.

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  • Listening to Male Survivors of Church Sexual Abuse

    Figueroa Alvear, Rocío; Tombs, David (2016-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is available in English and Spanish

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  • Escuchando a sobrevivientes masculinos de abuso sexual en la Iglesia

    Figueroa Alvear, Rocío; Tombs, David (2016-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is available in English and Spanish

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  • Care and Protection Orders and CYFS

    Atwool, Nicola; Gunn, Tracey (2012)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • New Zealanders with Disabilities and their Internet Use

    Smith, P

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report presents the findings from a series of interviews conducted with New Zealanders with disabilities who talked about their experiences of Internet use. For people with disabilities in New Zealand, living in the digital age has much wider implications when it comes to their access and accessibility. This report presents the findings from interviews conducted with 11 New Zealanders with a range of disabilities about their Internet use. A description of the study design is outlined in Section One, followed by the presentation of the findings of the research in Section Two. These findings look at firstly, how the participants engage in certain strategies to enable their Internet use in relation to their disability or impairment; secondly, the various online activities they like to participate in; thirdly, the range of barriers they have encountered in their Internet use; and, fourthly, participants’ attitudes towards the Internet and how it has impacted on their lives in terms of technology and independence, identity and socialisation. The conclusion in Section Three reflects upon the findings of the research, offers recommendations and makes suggestions for future research

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  • University of Otago Open Access Publishing Survey Results

    White, Richard; Remy, Melanie (2016-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Dunedin Energy Study 2015-2016

    Dippie, Olive; Stephenson, Janet; Jack, Michael (2017-04)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The Dunedin Energy Baseline Study is a joint research project between the Dunedin City Council (DCC) and the Centre for Sustainability at the University of Otago. The study takes stock of and analyses energy inputs to the city of Dunedin for the 2015 calendar year and 2016 financial year. This report builds on the Dunedin Energy Baseline Study which took stock of the year 2014. This study is an action under the DCC’s Energy Plan 1.0, which recognises the need to encourage research that will enable monitoring of Dunedin's energy uses and inputs. This study will also help inform and assist with implementing other Energy Plan 1.0's actions, such as the Night City action (improve lighting efficiency) and Cosy Homes action (improving heating of homes). The study was conducted between December 2016 and February 2017. The data collected was for inputs of consumer energy to Dunedin from 1 January 2015 to 30 June 2016. The findings provide an estimation of the total amount of each fuel type used within the city, with some indication of the main end uses of energy, and energy-related greenhouse gas emissions. Precise data was not available for some fuel types and where this is the case we explain the method of estimation and reason for the uncertainty. The project relied heavily on the willingness of many businesses and organisations to supply data. The project partners are extremely grateful to all participating individuals and organisations who dedicated a considerable amount of time to sourcing, compiling and providing relevant data. Throughout the report, 2015CY refers to calendar year (1 January – 31 December 2015) and 2016FY refers to financial year (1 July 2015 – 30 June 2016).

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  • The Cookbook: A discussion on the process, pitfalls and successes of hacking an open textbook

    Pearson, Erika (2014-05-16)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This document represents the process and reflections on the creation and curation of an open source 'texthack' for a media studies textbook for students in Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific. This document is provided as a resource for anyone contemplating a similar texthack project. Suggestions on processes and issues for consideration are presented along with information about success and difficulties of this specific project. The final curated 'text' this document refers to can be found at http://mediatexthack.wordpress.com.

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  • A report on occupational health and safety at the Fruitgrowers Chemical Company Remediation site, Mapua

    McBride, David (2012-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This investigation commissioned by the Department of Labour followed reports commissioned by the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment and the Ministry of Health into the clean up of this industrial site, previously used to produce and formulate agrochemicals. This report looks specifically at the occupational aspects of toxic site remediation and takes the form of an audit of compliance with the Health and Safety in Employment Act.

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  • The Agriculture Research Group on Sustainability Programme: The Design of A Longitudinal and Transdisciplinary Study of Agricultural Sustainability in New Zealand

    Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John; Manhire, Jon; Saunders, Caroline; Moller, Henrik; Reid, John; Benge, Jayson; Blackwell, Grant; Carey, Peter; Emanuelsson, Martin; Greer, Glen; Hunt, Lesley; Lucock, Dave; Rosin, Chris; Norton, David; McLeod, Catriona; Knight, Benjamin (2012)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report provides an overview of the key design features of the Agriculture Research Group on Sustainability (ARGOS) programme. This ongoing long-term research project started in 2003, involving a group of around 20 social scientists, ecologists, economists, and farm management experts in New Zealand. The overarching mission of ARGOS is to understand the enablers and barriers to the sustainability and resilience of agriculture, so as to enhance New Zealand’s economic, social and environmental wellbeing. To achieve this mission, the ARGOS team has designed and implemented a well-replicated and long-term programme of longitudinal research on more than 100 whole working farms, across different agricultural sectors, comparing a wide range of variables between three different farming systems: conventional, integrated management (IM) and organic. The first funded phase of this research programme has taken a systems and transdisciplinary approach, with an emphasis on statistical rigour and standardisation of methods, structured around the basic null hypothesis that there are no differences between the three farming systems. The primary focus of this approach is to examine the efficacy of alternative quality assurance (QA) schemes in delivering sustainable outcomes. This working paper seeks to inform potential collaborators and other interested parties about the way the ARGOS research programme has been structured, and to describe the rationale for this design. To this end, the report first documents the formation of the ARGOS group and the development of the aims and basic features of the design of the first funded phase of the research programme. The process of selection of agricultural sectors and individual farms within those sectors is described, along with the rationale behind this selection process. We then describe the key objectives of the research programme, and the way these were approached by research teams from different disciplines. The importance of transdisciplinarity is then discussed, providing insight into the associated benefits and pitfalls, and the lessons that were learned in the process of designing and implementing a transdisciplinary research programme. Finally, we discuss a number of issues surrounding the key features of our study design, evaluating their respective benefits and costs, and describe the future research directions suggested by the findings of the first phase of the programme.

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  • There are audits, and there are audits : response of New Zealand kiwifruit orchardists to the implementation of supermarket initiated audit schemes

    Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley; Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry is strongly focused on its commitments to producing a high quality product that meets the increasing demands of its main export markets. This report examines the recent introduction of two programmes designed to meet this goal – a retailer driven audit scheme (EurepGAP) and a fruit quality incentive plan (Taste ZESPRI) – from the perspective of the ARGOS research framework that seeks to assess and enhance the social, economic and environmental sustainability of the sector. The report draws insight from the response of the 36 orcharding households (with equal representation of Hayward, organic Hayward, and Hort 16A management systems) participating in the ARGOS project. Each of the households was involved in a semi-structured, qualitative interview designed to elicit their understandings of and response to constraints on orcharding practice. This report focuses specifically on those constraints associated with participation in the kiwifruit industry, of which EurepGAP and Taste Zespri were most frequently identified. Comparison of the orchardists’ responses to each programme provides insight to the use of such tools in order to promote both fruit qualities as well as socially and environmentally responsible orchard management.

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  • Social objective synthesis report: differentiation among participants farmers/orchardists in the ARGOS research programme

    Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley; Fairweather, John; Campbell, Hugh (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The main objectives of this report are to assess the extent to which it is possible to differentiate among the management system panels of ARGOS farms/orchards and to assess how such difference is manifest in the social dimensions of farm life. The report is framed by a brief outline of the social dynamics of agricultural sustainability and the emerging significance of market audit systems as a key structuring feature of contemporary attempts to achieve more sustainable production systems. The findings are presented separately for the kiwifruit and sheep/beef sector. The report concludes with recommendations for transdisciplinary engagement among the ARGOS objectives. Overall the current set of ARGOS social data for the kiwifruit sector suggests that, while there is great similarity among the panels, the Organic panel demonstrates the greatest number of distinctive characteristics. The assessment of difference among kiwifruit panels reflects survey results (six variables with statistically significant differences between the Organic and the other panels), qualitative data (more obviously distinctive characteristics attributed to the Organic panel) and causal map analysis (Organic orchardists listed a greater number of factors). The other surveyed data and the sketch maps do not show many panel differences. These kiwifruit results provided evidence of a number of key themes for which there was evidence of panel differences, including: breadth of view, good farming, environmental positioning, feedbacks, orchard management approaches, scope of control, and on- and off-farm relationships. While we have found that it is the Organic panel which is most distinctive, we also note that on some variables the Gold orchardists were closer to the Organic panel than the Kiwigreen panel (more double arrows and total connections in causal maps; a greater readiness to assume risk in the interviews). The sheep/beef results show that, once the many similarities among sheep/beef farmers are taken into account, the Organic panel again demonstrated several distinctive characteristics compared to the Conventional and Integrated panels. This assessment similarly reflects survey results (14 variables with statistically significant differences between the Organic and the other panels), qualitative data (distinctive response of Organic panel to several topics of enquiry) and causal map analysis (Organic farmers had a greater number of important factors). In addition, both the sketch map and the causal map data indicated that location explained some of the variation among farmers. The sheep/beef results provided evidence of a number of key themes for which there was evidence of panel differences, including: breadth of view, good farming, environmental positioning, feedbacks, on- and off-farm relationships, production system management and responses to innovation and risk. While we have found that it is the Organic panel which is most distinctive, we also note that on some variables the Integrated farmers were more similar to the Organic than the Conventional ones. Finally, the report interprets the findings in terms of their potential to differentiate the panels on the basis of social dimensions. While the literature shows at least 15 potential bases for social differentiation between panels, our results support 12 of these. Of these there is six (community; grower networks; craft orientation; sense of place; grower stress and wellbeing; identity) for which there evidence for subtle to moderate differentiation while the remaining six (commercial and economic orientation; learning and expertise; symbolic ‘look’ of the farmscape; indicators of on-farm processes; positioning towards nature/environment; farm management approaches) provide a stronger base for differentiation among panels. In its conclusion, the report identifies key indicated themes that have potential for transdisciplinary discussion, including: audit and market access, resilience, and intensification.

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  • Becoming the audited : response of New Zealand sheep/beef farmers to the introduction of supermarket initiated audit schemes

    Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley; Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The primary objective of the ARGOS project is the transdisciplinary examination of the condition of sustainable agriculture in New Zealand (including environmental, economic and social aspects). In pursuit of this objective to date, considerable effort has been dedicated to assessing the comparative sustainability or resilience of designated management panels in three branches of the New Zealand agricultural sector (dairy, kiwifruit and sheep/beef). For this purpose, farms of comparable size and similar location were assigned panel membership as determined by an individual farmer’s compliance (or lack thereof) with existing market audit schemes which – to varying degrees – regulate farm management practice. By sector, the panels are comprised of conventional and organic methods of dairy farming, integrated pest management (Hayward, green, and Hort 16a, gold) and organic (Hayward) methods of kiwifruit production, and conventional, integrated and organic methods of sheep and beef farming. Due to the distinct nature of practices associated with each panel, differences in the assessed ecological, economic and social features of the participating farms and farm households offer the potential to distinguish the relative sustainability of systems based on these practices.

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  • Understanding kiwifruit management using causal mapping

    Fairweather, John; Hunt, Lesley; Rosin, Chris; Campbell, Hugh; Benge, Jayson; Watts, Michael (2006)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Causal mapping was used to document how the 36 participating kiwifruit orchardists described and explained the management of their orchards. This approach asks the participants to identify the factors which are important to the management and performance of their orchards and to link these on a map. An aggregated or group map was produced from each of the individual orchardist maps. Data from the group map were used to characterise the overall orchard system as well as each of the three management systems being studied. A predominant finding is the degree of similarity in the maps of growers from across all three panels. Despite these overall findings, there were still differences operating between the three panels of growers. The overall group map reflects a production orientation and that the kiwifruit system is perceived as more of a management system rather than an environmental one. Organic orchardists produced a group map having the most distinctive qualities but they also shared a small number of distinctive characteristics with Gold orchardists. Both used more connections and more double arrows compared to Green. We conclude that the evidence supports the claim that at the aggregate level of the 36 kiwifruit orchardists the orchard system is not overly complex but at the level of each individual orchardist it is complex. Further, orchardists do not show a high level of holistic thinking about their orchard.

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  • New Zealand farmer and orchardist attitude and opinion survey 2008 : characteristics of organic, modified conventional (integrated) and organic management, and of the sheep/beef, horticulture and dairy sectors

    Fairweather, John; Hunt, Lesley; Benge, Jayson; Campbell, Hugh; Greer, Glen; Lucock, Dave; Manhire, John; Meadows, Sarah; Moller, Henrik; Saunders, Caroline; Fukuda, Yuki (2008)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The core of the ARGOS research design is a longitudinal panel study of New Zealand farms (including orchards in the case of the kiwifruit sector). Panels of 12 farms were selected to represent conventional, integrated and organic management for the sheep/beef sector, Kiwigreen, gold and organic green management for the kiwifruit sector, and conventional and organic management for the dairy sector. The research involves gathering data on these farms in order to assess the nature and effects of production from these different management systems from environmental, economic and social points of view. A survey in 2005 provided the means to examine general farmer attitudes and practices and to assess what differences may occur in the different sectors and for farms under different management systems. It also provided the means to show that the panels were reasonably representative of the sectors to which they belong. The ARGOS research design included a second survey in 2008 in order to test and elaborate on emerging research results. This report is the first presentation of the 2008 results.The questions asked of farmers were sourced from contributions from the team of ARGOS researchers drawing on results and issues in the literature, and from contemporary farming issues. These sources provided too many questions for one questionnaire. Accordingly, two questionnaires were used, one sent to a simple random sample of all New Zealand farmers and the other sent to separate random samples of each of the main farming sectors, namely sheep/beef, dairy and horticulture. The two surveys generated a large data set. In order to make the results easier to comprehend we have presented them in two separate outputs, as follows: 1. Analysis of the three main sectors (sheep/beef, dairy and horticulture) and the three main management systems (conventional, integrated and organic) (this report). 2. Analysis of agriculture generally (see companion report).

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  • Social Objective Synthesis Report 2: Social Differentiation and Choice of Management System among ARGOS Farmers/Orchardists

    Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley; Fairweather, John; Campbell, Hugh (2009)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The ARGOS (Agriculture Research Group on Sustainability) project was designed to enable the interrogation of the condition of sustainability in the New Zealand agriculture sector. To account for the country’s reliance on a neoliberal (or market driven) policy orientation, the research programme compares groups of producers organised into panels whose members comply with similar audit schemes that regulate entrance into high value export markets. Because these audit schemes often include criteria or standards associated with improved environmental or social practice, comparison of the panels on the basis of economic, environmental and social measures and indicators provides insight to the potential for such schemes to promote a more sustainable agriculture sector in New Zealand. To the extent that such schemes do influence practice, we would expect to differentiate among the panels in reference to such criteria. As part of the overall ARGOS analysis, this report provides a synthesis of the social research conducted within the project and contributes to the examination of the ARGOS null hypothesis, namely that there is no significant difference in the economic, environmental and social dimensions and characteristics of the participating farms and orchards. The report’s main objectives are to assess both the extent to which it is possible to differentiate among the management system panels of ARGOS farms/orchards and how such difference is manifest in the social dimensions of farm life. To the extent that this analysis provides evidence to reject the null hypothesis, it is possible to inform understandings of agricultural sustainability as well as provide insight to the potential pathways to improving this condition.

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