116 results for Report, 2007

  • Growth of Auckland: Dynamics of population change 2001 to 2006

    Friesen, Wardlow (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The population of the Auckland region grew by 12.4% between 2001 and 2006, making it the most rapidly growing region in New Zealand. In absolute terms, the region accounted for nearly half (49.6%) of the overall national population growth. ...

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  • Assessing the impact of Section 75 on individuals

    Reeves, Dorothy (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report provides an assessment of the extent of the equality outcomes, impacts and improvements, for each of the nine social categories as set out in Section 75 of the Northern Ireland Act 1998.

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  • Conceptions of Assessment and Feedback

    Peterson, Elizabeth; Irving, SE (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Assessment and feedback are an integral part of the teaching and learning process. They affect not only what is learnt, but how students learn, their motivation, goals, and sense of self (Cowie, 2003). If students have a negative conception of the role of assessment and they misinterpret the meaning of feedback, this can lead to reduced motivation and low self-esteem.

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  • The epidemiology of suicide in Scotland 1989-2004: an examination of temporal trends and risk factors at national and local levels

    Platt, S; Boyle, PJ; Crombie, I; Feng, Z; Exeter, Daniel (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    A research team based at the Universities of Edinburgh, Dundee and St Andrews 1 has been funded by the Scottish Executive???s National Programme for Improving Mental Health and Well-being to undertake a detailed epidemiological analysis of suicide 2 in Scotland at national and local levels during the period 1989-2004. The study findings are intended to support the implementation of Choose Life, the national strategy and action plan to prevent suicide in Scotland.

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  • When school's out: Conversations with parents, carers and children about out of school services

    Bellett, D; Dickson, M; Blyth, S; Clark, E; De Haan, IA; Murali, K; Skoti, T; Salamanzdhey, A (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Review of the evidence base for the national guidelines for the management of overweight and obesity

    Jull, Andrew; Lawes, Carlene; Ni Mhurchu, C; McRobbie, H; Eyles, Helen; Gorton, Delvina; Maddison, Ralph (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Clinical Trials Research Unit (CTRU) was contracted by the Ministry of Health to: 1. Identify and appraise the existing international evidence based guidelines on the management of overweight and obesity 2. Identify and evaluate new evidence published since the publication of the most suitable guideline on the management of overweight and obesity.

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  • Robotics in Computer Systems and Fine Arts Education

    Shih, A; Kuo, T; Patel, K; MacDonald, Bruce; Sumich, J; Sargent, G; Maybury, U; Yamada, K (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    An interdisciplinary robotics project involving the robot ???Shuriken??? is discussed in this paper. The collaboration is between Computer System Engineering (CSE) students and Fine Arts (FA) students of the university. The aim of the project is to involve both FA and CSE students in a project where they must work closely together in creating movements in a small mobile robot, animating the inanimate with an embodied intelligence. The Shuriken project was an interesting and valuable first step towards microcontroller programming for the CSE students. It involved calibration of the robot locomotion using omnidirectional wheels, as well as robot perception using sonar and infra-red sensors. The process of developing a behavioural application for the Shuriken in collaboration with the FA students, gave the CSE students a chance to integrate these aspects together with intelligent decision making. For the FA students the Shuriken project develops collaborative skills, strengthens their interdisciplinary design practice and expands career opportunities. They participate with group problemsolving within the parameters of the engineering technology. The Shuriken project leads to a range of final year projects in varying fields such as control systems, signal processing, image processing and embedded systems. In summary, the Shuriken project along with the concepts in robotics, teaches very important real life skills of multi-disciplinary team work.

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  • Physiological analysis of the metabolic typing diet in professional rugby union players

    Braakhuis, Andrea; Clarke, D; Edgar, D; Higgins, S (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim: The purpose of this pilot study is to investigate whether the metabolic typing diet warrants further investigation as a tool to design dietary regimes in professional rugby union players. The authors of the metabolic diet report that differences in metabolic make-up will alter dietary regimes that should be recommended to athletes who come from varied genetic backgrounds, such as rugby. However, most of the current research in the sport nutrition arena has been completed on Caucasian cyclists and may not be applicable to a power based team sport such as rugby union. Data Source: Five professional rugby players took part in this pilot study. The tests performed include basal metabolic rate measured for 20 minutes at steady state using a metalyzer; fasted blood pH using automatic cartridges; glucose challenge test based on the blood glucose response to a glucose/potassium solution and the metabolic typing questionnaire. Outcome Measure: The results from the questionnaire, basal metabolism, fasted pH and glucose challenge test were converted into a category as defined by the metabolic typing diet to investigate whether there was agreement. Results: The five players were categorised as ???mixed oxidizers??? according to the questionnaire. The results from the laboratory tests and the questionnaire differed. The basal metabolic rates resulted in zero ???mixed oxidizers???, categorised based on the metabolic rate and four subjects based on the respiratory quotient values, the fasted pH results rated none of the players as ???mixed oxidizers??? and the glucose challenge test rated three players as ???moderate fast oxidizers???, which is close to mixed oxidizers. Conclusion: Results suggest that at least in Caucasian professional rugby players the metabolic typing diet questionnaire results did not accurately reflect the actual metabolic processes in a usable way.

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  • Assessing Sustainable Development: what kind of sustainability for what kind of development?

    Knight-Lenihan, Stephen (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introducing sustainable development terminology into planning processes raises expectations of an improved ability to address critical strategic issues through cross-sector approaches. Questions arising from this assumption include: What does the new regime allow that the previous one, as represented in particular by the Resource Management Act 1991, did not? What are the key issues? And how are ecological, economic and social values weighted against each other?

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  • New Zealand Economic Transformation from Growth and Innovation

    Haworth, Nigel (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Kilburn Blair Athol: Community Capacity Building Project

    Verity, F; Johnston, F; Marlowe, Jay (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Fixing the NCEA: Ongoing problems, current reforms and proposed changes

    Thomas, Steven (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Correlated Equilibrium and Nash Equilibrium as an Observer's Assessment of the Game

    Hillas, John; Kohlberg, E; Pratt, J (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Noncooperative games are examined from the point of view of an outside observer who believes that the players are rational and that they know at least as much as the observer. The observer is assumed to be able to observe many instances of the play of the game; these instances are identical in the sense that the observer cannot distinguish between the settings in which di???erent plays occur. If the observer does not believe that he will be able to o???er bene???cial advice then he must believe that the players are playing a correlated equilibrium, though he may not initially know which correlated equilibrium. If the observer also believes that, in a certain sense, there is nothing connecting the players in a particular instance of the game then he must believe that the correlated equilibrium they are playing is, in fact, a Nash equilibrium.

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  • Report of the Evaluation of Chronic Care Management in Counties Manukau: Phase One

    Kenealy, Timothy; Carswell, PJ; Clinton, Janet; Mahony, Faith (2007-04-30)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This external evaluation was commissioned to explore broad level outcome measures from the Chronic Care Management (CCM) programme. It was also designed to give an overview of factors that might enable or hinder programme implementation and growth. Evaluation objectives More specifically, the objectives of this evaluation included to: Use available CCM data to describe clinical outcomes and compare these with international benchmarks Explore outcomes across PHO???s Describe variation in implementation processes across PHO???s Describe practice characteristics that can be recognised or built on to support CCM Describe how decision support has been implemented Identify key stakeholder questions and concerns about implementation effectiveness, costs, health gains, monitoring, opportunities for improvement and opportunities to extend the model to other health problems.

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  • Providing Post-Discharge Support in an Outpatient Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Context: A Feasibility Study

    Pulford, Justin; Black, Stella; Wheeler, Amanda; Sheridan, Jane; Adams, Peter (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This project examined whether the provision of post-discharge support was acceptable to, and theoretically possible in, the New Zealand outpatient alcohol and other drug treatment sector. The research team explored stakeholder interest in the concept of post-discharge support; elicited stakeholder response to a range of possible post-discharge support models; afforded stakeholders an opportunity to identify alternative models of post-discharge support; and made recommendations as to which models of post-discharge support would be best suited to a pilot in the New Zealand context. It was anticipated that the project findings could potentially inform a pilot study of post-discharge support in practice.

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  • A psychosocial needs assessment of communities in 14 conflict-affected districts in Aceh

    Good, M-JD; Good, BJ; Grayman, Jesse Hession; Lakoma, M (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Between December 2005 and November 2006, a team of researchers from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Department of Social Medicine from Harvard Medical School, carried out a Psychosocial Needs Assessment (PNA) in high conflict sub-districts across Aceh, in two phases. Phase 2, or Psychosocial Needs Assessment 2 (PNA2) conducted research in 75 high conflict villages in 11 districts throughout Aceh. The PNA2 report is an extension of the research for Psychosocial Needs Assessment 1 (PNA1), which was conducted in high conflict sub districts in Aceh Utara, Bireuen and Pidie, Aceh in February 2006. Research for this second study was conducted in 10 districts in July 2006 with funding from the World Bank, Decentralization Support Facility (DSF), IOM, and the Harvard Medical School, and in Aceh Besar district in November 2006, funded by IOM and the Harvard Medical School. The primary focus of this report is to provide findings from the PNA2 data and to compare these data with data previously analysed and published in the first Psychosocial Needs Assessment (PNA1) report.(1) Research for PNA1 was funded by the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, IOM and Harvard Medical School. The basic goal of the overall project was to evaluate the psychosocial and mental health needs in communities which have been deeply affected by the years of conflict between armed forces of the Republic of Indonesia and the Free Aceh Movement (GAM), given the cessation of violence after the signing of the August 2005 Memorandum of Understanding. This report focuses on past traumatic experiences and current psychosocial and mental health needs in high conflict areas throughout Aceh. Although the peace agreement ended almost three decades of violence most of the traumatic experiences reported date from the early 1990's until August 2005. The report deliberately refrains from identifying groups or individuals instrumental in the violence visited upon these communities.

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