393 results for Report, 2007

  • Codfish Island/Whenua Hou Archaeological Project: Preliminary Report

    Smith, Ian; Anderson, Atholl (2007-08)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • New Zealand Agriculture Policy Review

    Gilmour, Brad; Gurung, Rajendra Kumar (Oct-2007)

    Report
    AgEcon Search

    In 1984, New Zealand introduced important policy reforms in order to address major macroeconomic and fiscal imbalances. New Zealand's support to agricultural producers rapidly decreased from 30 percent of the value of production to about 2 percent, and has remained the lowest among OECD economies since that time.

    After a difficult transition, the removal of subsidies resulted in a more diversified and competitive rural economy in New Zealand; total factor productivity growth has been roughly 2.5 percent annually since 1984, compared to roughly 1.5 percent in the prereform period.

    This Policy Review focuses on agricultural policy today and how New Zealand is supporting the agricultural sector now without resorting to subsidies. It describes the policy New Zealand uses to support farmers dealing with adverse events such as climatic disasters. It also describes New Zealand's strategy for promoting competiveness in world markets.

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  • Quantitative Study: Household Uptake of Sustainable Solutions

    Alex Woodley; Beverley Frederikson; Ann Smith; Alison Greenaway (09-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    A homeowner survey assesses whether householders adopt sustainable technologies for their homes and identifies any barriers. Most changes are low cost and easy to DIY, but there is interest in high cost energy efficiency features. Barriers include a lack of awareness whether homes contain sustainable features or not.

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  • Market Transformation Housing Industry Survey

    Maurice Marquadt; Cerasela Stancu; Sarah Gunn (02-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    Survey assessing the knowledge and uptake of sustainable business practices by the housing industry sector. Identifies examples of sustainability best practice and companies willing to develop best practice case studies.

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  • Qualitative Study: Perceptions of 'Sustainability' and Uptake of Sustainable Solutions by Householders

    Rachael Trotman; Beverley Frederikson; Ann Smith; Alison Greenaway (09-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    In-depth interviews with 43 households investigates what sustainability means to householders, assesses their engagement in adopting sustainable solutions for their home and perceived barriers in doing so. It also identifies some indicators to measure household uptake of sustainable solutions.

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  • Market Transformation Interventions: Creating demand and supply for sustainable housing

    Cerasela Stancu; Graeme Finlay; Sarah Gunn (03-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    Identified market transformation best practice through international review. Generated list of potential interventions and analysed a short list of interventions including WOF, value case, rates based on environmental performance and trusted information.

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  • Making Policy and Regulations Rain Tank Friendly

    Maggie Lawton; Damon Birchfield; David Kettle (03-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    This investigation reviewed the legal and policy pathways for mandating to include rain tanks for water conservation in new homes in the Auckland Region. It recommends the steps that would be most effective in making policy and regulation rain tank friendly.

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  • Demand Management Through Water Retrofit Projects

    Damon Birchfield (03-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    Reviews water demand management initiatives in New Zealand. Few councils have implemented programmes to significantly reduce annual water consumption per capita at the household level. Identifies the reasons for water conservation in New Zealand and details overseas initiatives, especially Australia. Impressive water savings from the Sydney programme are highlighted. Project undertaken to support Papakowhai Renovation project.

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  • Indoor Environment Quality

    Robyn Phipps (09-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    Backgrounds the issues of healthy and unhealthy home environments and provides evidence that the home environment and health are intrinsically linked. Identifies pollutants that are of concern in new and existing homes. Reviews current knowledge and research base in New Zealand. Found that few comprehensive studies have been conducted in New Zealand and found some large knowledge gaps

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  • Guidelines for LCA Practitioners and Users of Building Related LCA Studies

    Barbara Nebel (05-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a tool to analyse the environmental impacts of building materials and buildings. The ISO framework provides an appropriate basis for LCA studies. This paper assists LCA practitioners to implement the ISO framework in relation to building related LCAs, and enables users of LCA results to assess the quality and relevance of existing LCA studies.

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  • The Role of LCA in Decision Making in the Context of Sustainable Development

    Barbara Nebel (09-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    This paper gives examples on how the results from Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies and the process of conducting the study can assist in decision making processes. Emphasis is on explaining and guidance on interpretation of the information delivered by an LCA as an essential part of achieving broader goals such as sustainability rather than the simple comparison of products. Gives examples of companies who have already successfully implemented LCA in their organisations. The paper concludes with recommendations about using LCA more effectively in decision making processes in the built environment in New Zealand.

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  • Retrofit Technologies Database

    Barbara Nebel; Roman Jaques; Michael Jack; Karen Bayne; Per Nielsen; Susan Krumdieck (10-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    Developed database of technologies suitable for retrofitting existing homes, ranked by potential.  The original aim was to develop a  THEN Home as an exemplar of retrofit.  However, Beacon's focus moved away from individual technologies to understanding whole of house dynamics, and to a refined set of priorities.  This works was not taken any further.

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  • Scoping Waste in the Residential Built Environment

    Michelle Kazor (02-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    Scoping report on level and composition of solid waste in New Zealand, current waste policy and regulation, measures taken to minimise construction and demolition waste and household waste with recommendations for areas which Beacon might want to influence

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  • Sustainable Homes National Value Case: Report

    Adolf Stroombergen,Greg Brown; David Grimmond; Michael Mills; Meenakshi Sankar (09-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    Presents the value case for bringing housing to Beacon's High Standard of Sustainability, evaluating four types of benefits: private economic benefits to households, environmental benefits, private social benefits, and national resource use efficiency.

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  • Sustainability Options for Retrofitting New Zealand Houses: Theoretical cost benefit analysis

    M Phillips (09-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    A theoretical cost benefit for options to retrofit for water and energy was carried out using ALF. At a national level, these options are worth implementing from a financial perspective: rainwater tanks (for Auckland only); low flow shower heads for high pressure systems; water efficient washing machines; water heating upgrade to SWH, instant gas or heat pump; floor and ceiling insulation.  Research undertaken to support Papakowhai Renovation project

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  • Policy and Regulation: Clarification of Beacon's role

    Melony Clark (09-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    Considers how Beacon can best achieve a high standard of sustainability across New Zealand's homes and neighbourhoods in New Zealand's policy and regulatory process. Considers Beacon's role with respect to residential rating tools, and the pros and cons of using a systems approach to focus research on the component parts of the home.

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  • District Plan Barriers and Incentives to Sustainable Residential Building: Case Studies

    Chloe Trenouth; David Mead (05-Jan-2007)

    Report
    Beacon Pathway Ltd

    Reviews three local authorities (Christchurch City Council, Kapiti Coast District Council and Hamilton City Council) identifying potential barriers to implementing sustainable residential development within district plans and codes of practice. Identifies common barriers and provisions that encourage more sustainable development.

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  • There are audits, and there are audits : response of New Zealand kiwifruit orchardists to the implementation of supermarket initiated audit schemes

    Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley; Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry is strongly focused on its commitments to producing a high quality product that meets the increasing demands of its main export markets. This report examines the recent introduction of two programmes designed to meet this goal – a retailer driven audit scheme (EurepGAP) and a fruit quality incentive plan (Taste ZESPRI) – from the perspective of the ARGOS research framework that seeks to assess and enhance the social, economic and environmental sustainability of the sector. The report draws insight from the response of the 36 orcharding households (with equal representation of Hayward, organic Hayward, and Hort 16A management systems) participating in the ARGOS project. Each of the households was involved in a semi-structured, qualitative interview designed to elicit their understandings of and response to constraints on orcharding practice. This report focuses specifically on those constraints associated with participation in the kiwifruit industry, of which EurepGAP and Taste Zespri were most frequently identified. Comparison of the orchardists’ responses to each programme provides insight to the use of such tools in order to promote both fruit qualities as well as socially and environmentally responsible orchard management.

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  • Social objective synthesis report: differentiation among participants farmers/orchardists in the ARGOS research programme

    Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley; Fairweather, John; Campbell, Hugh (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The main objectives of this report are to assess the extent to which it is possible to differentiate among the management system panels of ARGOS farms/orchards and to assess how such difference is manifest in the social dimensions of farm life. The report is framed by a brief outline of the social dynamics of agricultural sustainability and the emerging significance of market audit systems as a key structuring feature of contemporary attempts to achieve more sustainable production systems. The findings are presented separately for the kiwifruit and sheep/beef sector. The report concludes with recommendations for transdisciplinary engagement among the ARGOS objectives. Overall the current set of ARGOS social data for the kiwifruit sector suggests that, while there is great similarity among the panels, the Organic panel demonstrates the greatest number of distinctive characteristics. The assessment of difference among kiwifruit panels reflects survey results (six variables with statistically significant differences between the Organic and the other panels), qualitative data (more obviously distinctive characteristics attributed to the Organic panel) and causal map analysis (Organic orchardists listed a greater number of factors). The other surveyed data and the sketch maps do not show many panel differences. These kiwifruit results provided evidence of a number of key themes for which there was evidence of panel differences, including: breadth of view, good farming, environmental positioning, feedbacks, orchard management approaches, scope of control, and on- and off-farm relationships. While we have found that it is the Organic panel which is most distinctive, we also note that on some variables the Gold orchardists were closer to the Organic panel than the Kiwigreen panel (more double arrows and total connections in causal maps; a greater readiness to assume risk in the interviews). The sheep/beef results show that, once the many similarities among sheep/beef farmers are taken into account, the Organic panel again demonstrated several distinctive characteristics compared to the Conventional and Integrated panels. This assessment similarly reflects survey results (14 variables with statistically significant differences between the Organic and the other panels), qualitative data (distinctive response of Organic panel to several topics of enquiry) and causal map analysis (Organic farmers had a greater number of important factors). In addition, both the sketch map and the causal map data indicated that location explained some of the variation among farmers. The sheep/beef results provided evidence of a number of key themes for which there was evidence of panel differences, including: breadth of view, good farming, environmental positioning, feedbacks, on- and off-farm relationships, production system management and responses to innovation and risk. While we have found that it is the Organic panel which is most distinctive, we also note that on some variables the Integrated farmers were more similar to the Organic than the Conventional ones. Finally, the report interprets the findings in terms of their potential to differentiate the panels on the basis of social dimensions. While the literature shows at least 15 potential bases for social differentiation between panels, our results support 12 of these. Of these there is six (community; grower networks; craft orientation; sense of place; grower stress and wellbeing; identity) for which there evidence for subtle to moderate differentiation while the remaining six (commercial and economic orientation; learning and expertise; symbolic ‘look’ of the farmscape; indicators of on-farm processes; positioning towards nature/environment; farm management approaches) provide a stronger base for differentiation among panels. In its conclusion, the report identifies key indicated themes that have potential for transdisciplinary discussion, including: audit and market access, resilience, and intensification.

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  • Becoming the audited : response of New Zealand sheep/beef farmers to the introduction of supermarket initiated audit schemes

    Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley; Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The primary objective of the ARGOS project is the transdisciplinary examination of the condition of sustainable agriculture in New Zealand (including environmental, economic and social aspects). In pursuit of this objective to date, considerable effort has been dedicated to assessing the comparative sustainability or resilience of designated management panels in three branches of the New Zealand agricultural sector (dairy, kiwifruit and sheep/beef). For this purpose, farms of comparable size and similar location were assigned panel membership as determined by an individual farmer’s compliance (or lack thereof) with existing market audit schemes which – to varying degrees – regulate farm management practice. By sector, the panels are comprised of conventional and organic methods of dairy farming, integrated pest management (Hayward, green, and Hort 16a, gold) and organic (Hayward) methods of kiwifruit production, and conventional, integrated and organic methods of sheep and beef farming. Due to the distinct nature of practices associated with each panel, differences in the assessed ecological, economic and social features of the participating farms and farm households offer the potential to distinguish the relative sustainability of systems based on these practices.

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