113 results for Report, 2007

  • Codfish Island/Whenua Hou Archaeological Project: Preliminary Report

    Smith, Ian; Anderson, Atholl (2007-08)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • There are audits, and there are audits : response of New Zealand kiwifruit orchardists to the implementation of supermarket initiated audit schemes

    Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley; Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    New Zealand’s kiwifruit industry is strongly focused on its commitments to producing a high quality product that meets the increasing demands of its main export markets. This report examines the recent introduction of two programmes designed to meet this goal – a retailer driven audit scheme (EurepGAP) and a fruit quality incentive plan (Taste ZESPRI) – from the perspective of the ARGOS research framework that seeks to assess and enhance the social, economic and environmental sustainability of the sector. The report draws insight from the response of the 36 orcharding households (with equal representation of Hayward, organic Hayward, and Hort 16A management systems) participating in the ARGOS project. Each of the households was involved in a semi-structured, qualitative interview designed to elicit their understandings of and response to constraints on orcharding practice. This report focuses specifically on those constraints associated with participation in the kiwifruit industry, of which EurepGAP and Taste Zespri were most frequently identified. Comparison of the orchardists’ responses to each programme provides insight to the use of such tools in order to promote both fruit qualities as well as socially and environmentally responsible orchard management.

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  • Social objective synthesis report: differentiation among participants farmers/orchardists in the ARGOS research programme

    Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley; Fairweather, John; Campbell, Hugh (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The main objectives of this report are to assess the extent to which it is possible to differentiate among the management system panels of ARGOS farms/orchards and to assess how such difference is manifest in the social dimensions of farm life. The report is framed by a brief outline of the social dynamics of agricultural sustainability and the emerging significance of market audit systems as a key structuring feature of contemporary attempts to achieve more sustainable production systems. The findings are presented separately for the kiwifruit and sheep/beef sector. The report concludes with recommendations for transdisciplinary engagement among the ARGOS objectives. Overall the current set of ARGOS social data for the kiwifruit sector suggests that, while there is great similarity among the panels, the Organic panel demonstrates the greatest number of distinctive characteristics. The assessment of difference among kiwifruit panels reflects survey results (six variables with statistically significant differences between the Organic and the other panels), qualitative data (more obviously distinctive characteristics attributed to the Organic panel) and causal map analysis (Organic orchardists listed a greater number of factors). The other surveyed data and the sketch maps do not show many panel differences. These kiwifruit results provided evidence of a number of key themes for which there was evidence of panel differences, including: breadth of view, good farming, environmental positioning, feedbacks, orchard management approaches, scope of control, and on- and off-farm relationships. While we have found that it is the Organic panel which is most distinctive, we also note that on some variables the Gold orchardists were closer to the Organic panel than the Kiwigreen panel (more double arrows and total connections in causal maps; a greater readiness to assume risk in the interviews). The sheep/beef results show that, once the many similarities among sheep/beef farmers are taken into account, the Organic panel again demonstrated several distinctive characteristics compared to the Conventional and Integrated panels. This assessment similarly reflects survey results (14 variables with statistically significant differences between the Organic and the other panels), qualitative data (distinctive response of Organic panel to several topics of enquiry) and causal map analysis (Organic farmers had a greater number of important factors). In addition, both the sketch map and the causal map data indicated that location explained some of the variation among farmers. The sheep/beef results provided evidence of a number of key themes for which there was evidence of panel differences, including: breadth of view, good farming, environmental positioning, feedbacks, on- and off-farm relationships, production system management and responses to innovation and risk. While we have found that it is the Organic panel which is most distinctive, we also note that on some variables the Integrated farmers were more similar to the Organic than the Conventional ones. Finally, the report interprets the findings in terms of their potential to differentiate the panels on the basis of social dimensions. While the literature shows at least 15 potential bases for social differentiation between panels, our results support 12 of these. Of these there is six (community; grower networks; craft orientation; sense of place; grower stress and wellbeing; identity) for which there evidence for subtle to moderate differentiation while the remaining six (commercial and economic orientation; learning and expertise; symbolic ‘look’ of the farmscape; indicators of on-farm processes; positioning towards nature/environment; farm management approaches) provide a stronger base for differentiation among panels. In its conclusion, the report identifies key indicated themes that have potential for transdisciplinary discussion, including: audit and market access, resilience, and intensification.

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  • Becoming the audited : response of New Zealand sheep/beef farmers to the introduction of supermarket initiated audit schemes

    Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley; Campbell, Hugh; Fairweather, John (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The primary objective of the ARGOS project is the transdisciplinary examination of the condition of sustainable agriculture in New Zealand (including environmental, economic and social aspects). In pursuit of this objective to date, considerable effort has been dedicated to assessing the comparative sustainability or resilience of designated management panels in three branches of the New Zealand agricultural sector (dairy, kiwifruit and sheep/beef). For this purpose, farms of comparable size and similar location were assigned panel membership as determined by an individual farmer’s compliance (or lack thereof) with existing market audit schemes which – to varying degrees – regulate farm management practice. By sector, the panels are comprised of conventional and organic methods of dairy farming, integrated pest management (Hayward, green, and Hort 16a, gold) and organic (Hayward) methods of kiwifruit production, and conventional, integrated and organic methods of sheep and beef farming. Due to the distinct nature of practices associated with each panel, differences in the assessed ecological, economic and social features of the participating farms and farm households offer the potential to distinguish the relative sustainability of systems based on these practices.

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  • New Zealand farmer and grower attitude and opinion survey : analysis by sector and management system

    Fairweather, John; Hunt, Lesley; Cook, Andrew; Rosin, Chris; Campbell, Hugh (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The core of the ARGOS research design is a longitudinal panel study. Panels of 12 farms were selected to represent conventional, integrated and organic management for the sheep/beef sector, Kiwigreen, gold and organic management for the kiwifruit sector, and conventional and organic management for the dairy sector. The research involves gathering data on these farms in order to assess the nature of production from environmental, economic and social points of view and the design rests on testing the null hypothesis that there is no difference between management systems. Farms in the panels were generally typical of their sectors in terms of obvious characteristics such as size, level of production etc. Farms from a range of geographies and with different levels of intensity of production were chosen in order to achieve results that would be applicable to a broad range of farms.

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  • The representativeness of ARGOS panels and between panel comparisons

    Fairweather, John; Hunt, Lesley; Cook, Andrew; Rosin, Chris; Campbell, Hugh (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The core of the ARGOS research design is a longitudinal panel study. Panels of 12 farms were selected to represent conventional, integrated and organic management for the sheep/beef sector, Kiwigreen, gold and organic management for the kiwifruit sector, and conventional and organic management for the dairy sector. The research involves gathering data on these farms in order to assess the nature of production from environmental, economic and social points of view and the design rests on testing the null hypothesis that there is no difference between management systems. Farms in the panels were generally typical of their sectors in terms of obvious characteristics such as size, level of production etc. Farms from a range of geographies and with different levels of intensity of production were chosen in order to achieve results that would be applicable to a broad range of farms. Behind this design is the assumption that the panels are reasonably representative of the sectors to which they belong. The analysis presented in this report tests this assumption. Survey data from both the panels and the sectors are used in order to make comparisons on a number of dimensions of farming.

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  • New Zealand farmer and grower attitude and opinion survey : kiwifruit sector

    Fairweather, John; Hunt, Lesley; Cook, Andrew; Rosin, Chris; Benge, Jayson; Campbell, Hugh (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The specific research objective addressed in this report is to assess the kiwifruit sector on a number of topical dimensions. In addition, a related objective is to assess how these dimensions may vary by management system (gold, green and organic). The core of the ARGOS research design is a longitudinal panel study. Panels of 12 farms were selected to represent conventional, integrated and organic management for the sheep/beef sector, green, gold (both employing IPM practices according to ZESPRI’s plant protection programmes) and organic management for the kiwifruit sector, and conventional and organic management for the dairy sector. The research involves gathering data on these farms in order to assess the nature of production from environmental, economic and social points of view and the design rests on testing the null hypothesis that there is no difference between management systems. Farms in the panels were generally typical of their sectors in terms of obvious characteristics such as size, level of production etc. Farms from a range of geographies and with different levels of intensity of production were chosen in order to achieve results that would be applicable to a broad range of farms.

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  • Understanding sheep/beef farm management using casual mapping: development and application of a two-stage approach

    Fairweather, John; Hunt, Lesley; Rosin, Chris; Campbell, Hugh; Lucock, David (2007)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Causal mapping was used to document how the participating sheep/beef farmers described and explained the factors involved in their farming systems, broadly defined to include economic, social and environmental factors. Participants identified which factors in the 41 provided were important to the management and performance of their farms and to link these on a map. The overall group map shows that at the core of the map are personal (farmer decision maker and satisfaction) and production factors surrounded by soil, environmental, climatic, family and cost factors. True to the family farm structure of much of New Zealand farming, the map shows the closely integrated role of family in the farming system. And the map is not insular since there are connections extending outwards including other people and related factors especially the marketing or processing organisation along with customers, advisors and sources of information. There is a strong production orientation in the map with some of the strongest connections from farmer decision maker to fertiliser and soil fertility health and to production. However, the environment is also important, reflected in farm environmental health and farm environment as a place to live. The sources of satisfaction (production, farmer decision maker, farm environment as a place to live and family needs) are quite varied and reflect the broad mix of factors at the core of the map.

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  • Maori Business Networks in Dunedin: Waiho i te toipoto, kaua i te toiroa: Let us keep close together, not far apart

    Amoamo, Maria; Mirosa, Miranda; Tutakangahau, Hiria (2007-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is the result of a partnership and consequent research brief established between the University of Otago School of Business, Te Kupeka Umaka Maori Ki Araiteuru Inc. (KUMA), the Dunedin City Council, Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu and Te Tapuae o Rehua. The brief is principally concerned with the collection and analysis of information involving the KUMA (Southern Maori) business network, its current issues and needs and its contribution to the Dunedin economy. This information is presented in the context of published work about Maori enterprise activities in general; including the 2006 Hui Taumata initiative, Accelerating Maori Economic Development. Information was collected from nineteen Dunedin-based businesses in the KUMA network, using Kaupapa Maori principles that included face-to-face interviews. The interviews were tape recorded and then transcribed in ordinary English spelling for ease of reference. Over 20 hours of data was collected in this way. Apart from providing details about the businesses themselves, project findings focus on core issues and themes that are pertinent to successful business growth and development for network members. Key findings include: - The Hui Taumata call to develop people and enterprise for Maori business growth is emerging under the KUMA umbrella. Considerable social capital is evident in the network, but the connection between this capital and the development of Maori assets is an issue that requires significant attention. - KUMA is a young and forward-looking network that has potential to offer regional and national leadership in assisting with the development of Maori business activities. - Time, staffing and compliance issues were identified as the major barriers to current business development - Areas of business weakness that could benefit from professional development activities in the network include research development, marketing, management practices and administration. - The realisation that Maori must accept responsibility for their own actions is a key driving force behind the outcomes of Hui Taumata 2005. The project findings indicate that collective aspiration and the concept of ‘rangatiratanga’ (self-determination) are key motivating elements for launching Maori business start-ups. - Maori network membership is desirable because of the long term commitment to ‘whanaungatanga’ (kinship), rather than for reasons of financial gain. - The ability to network and to create successful businesses is not only about business success but also about the growing esteem and mana of a group of people who are clearly taking charge of their lives. In order to ensure that the KUMA network can be strengthened and developed for both local and national benefit, the following actions are recommended: - Mechanisms are explored to develop and strengthen the KUMA network, including financial support. - The KUMA network reviews its activities in line with members’ suggestions. - Appropriate encouragement and support is provided for senior Maori students to undertake further research in this field. - Executive education opportunities are explored through ongoing dialogue between the School of Business and project partners. - Funding for regional and national studies of other Maori networks is pursued in order to provide a more comprehensive profile of business values, needs and support mechanisms. - Long-term planning for the future global development of Maori businesses is explored between project partners. - The processes developed to generate this project are continued.

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  • Enquiring Minds

    Morgan, John; Williamson, B; Lee, T; Facer, K; Futurelab (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Practice Nursing Development: Implications and opportunities in the management of continuing illness

    Gourlay, K; Jowsey, Tanisha; the SCIPPS Team (2007-10)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A psychosocial needs assessment of communities in 14 conflict-affected districts in Aceh

    Good, M-JD; Good, BJ; Grayman, Jesse Hession; Lakoma, M (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Between December 2005 and November 2006, a team of researchers from the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Department of Social Medicine from Harvard Medical School, carried out a Psychosocial Needs Assessment (PNA) in high conflict sub-districts across Aceh, in two phases. Phase 2, or Psychosocial Needs Assessment 2 (PNA2) conducted research in 75 high conflict villages in 11 districts throughout Aceh. The PNA2 report is an extension of the research for Psychosocial Needs Assessment 1 (PNA1), which was conducted in high conflict sub districts in Aceh Utara, Bireuen and Pidie, Aceh in February 2006. Research for this second study was conducted in 10 districts in July 2006 with funding from the World Bank, Decentralization Support Facility (DSF), IOM, and the Harvard Medical School, and in Aceh Besar district in November 2006, funded by IOM and the Harvard Medical School. The primary focus of this report is to provide findings from the PNA2 data and to compare these data with data previously analysed and published in the first Psychosocial Needs Assessment (PNA1) report.(1) Research for PNA1 was funded by the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, IOM and Harvard Medical School. The basic goal of the overall project was to evaluate the psychosocial and mental health needs in communities which have been deeply affected by the years of conflict between armed forces of the Republic of Indonesia and the Free Aceh Movement (GAM), given the cessation of violence after the signing of the August 2005 Memorandum of Understanding. This report focuses on past traumatic experiences and current psychosocial and mental health needs in high conflict areas throughout Aceh. Although the peace agreement ended almost three decades of violence most of the traumatic experiences reported date from the early 1990's until August 2005. The report deliberately refrains from identifying groups or individuals instrumental in the violence visited upon these communities.

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  • Report of the Evaluation of Chronic Care Management in Counties Manukau: Phase One

    Kenealy, Timothy; Carswell, PJ; Clinton, Janet; Mahony, Faith (2007-04-30)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This external evaluation was commissioned to explore broad level outcome measures from the Chronic Care Management (CCM) programme. It was also designed to give an overview of factors that might enable or hinder programme implementation and growth. Evaluation objectives More specifically, the objectives of this evaluation included to: Use available CCM data to describe clinical outcomes and compare these with international benchmarks Explore outcomes across PHO’s Describe variation in implementation processes across PHO’s Describe practice characteristics that can be recognised or built on to support CCM Describe how decision support has been implemented Identify key stakeholder questions and concerns about implementation effectiveness, costs, health gains, monitoring, opportunities for improvement and opportunities to extend the model to other health problems.

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  • Assessing Sustainable Development: what kind of sustainability for what kind of development?

    Knight-Lenihan, Stephen (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introducing sustainable development terminology into planning processes raises expectations of an improved ability to address critical strategic issues through cross-sector approaches. Questions arising from this assumption include: What does the new regime allow that the previous one, as represented in particular by the Resource Management Act 1991, did not? What are the key issues? And how are ecological, economic and social values weighted against each other?

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  • New Zealand Economic Transformation from Growth and Innovation

    Haworth, Nigel (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Kilburn Blair Athol: Community Capacity Building Project

    Verity, F; Johnston, F; Marlowe, Jay (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • When school's out: Conversations with parents, carers and children about out of school services

    Bellett, D; Dickson, M; Blyth, S; Clark, E; De Haan, Irene; Murali, K; Skoti, T; Salamanzdhey, A (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • O le ulua'i faitautusi ma le tusitusi: o a'oa'oga maoa'e ma lona a'oa'oina i a'oga amata a le Pasifika. Early literacy: quality teaching and learning in Pasifika early childhood education

    Mara, Diane; Burgess, F (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Executive summary There are few reported studies of teaching and learning in Pasifika bicultural and immersion early childhood centres. The research reported here is of a one-year action research project aimed at encouraging and strengthening children’s Samoan language and literacy learning within an a’oga amata. The study explored the beliefs teachers held about language acquisition and early literacy, the action research process, and the changes that occurred in the teachers’ pedagogical practice over the course of the year. Data was collected in two phases in September 2005 and July 2006, through interviews with teachers about their beliefs and practices, group discussions with parents about their aspirations for children and views of the a’oga amata, videotaped learning episodes focused on literacy experiences, ratings of process quality, and observations and field notes made by the professional development facilitator and researcher.

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  • Auckland Council Urban Design: A Maori perspective and sense of place

    Henry, Lena (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report contributes to the scoping of issues to be addressed in the Auckland Council Urban Design Framework. The whakapapa, foundations and history of place and people is of up-most importance to Maori Planning and has also become a cornerstone in transformative planning practice ((Sandercock 2004). Iwi confidence and trust in local government plans and process are often met with tension and distrust due to colonisation and their experiences of being ignored, marginalised and the misappropriation and interpretation of cultural values and taonga. The Urban Design Framework is an ideal opportunity to promote Auckland's unique heritage and ensure that Maori sense of place and cultural values are embedded in the design and feel of Auckland's future.

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  • The impact of effective facilitation on teaching and learning in the arts: Discipline-based case studies in the Auckland/Northland region 2005: Final report

    Thwaites, Trevor; Ferens, Diana; Lines, David (2007)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Multi-method research investigated the effectiveness of professional development facilitation processes and structures in the arts at national/regional levels and the impact on teachers' knowledge and student achievement in Auckland/Northland.

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