138 results for Report, 2008

  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

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  • Excavations at Te Hoe Mahia Peninsula

    Smith, Ian; Prickett, Nigel (2008-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • New Zealand farmer and orchardist attitude and opinion survey 2008 : characteristics of organic, modified conventional (integrated) and organic management, and of the sheep/beef, horticulture and dairy sectors

    Fairweather, John; Hunt, Lesley; Benge, Jayson; Campbell, Hugh; Greer, Glen; Lucock, Dave; Manhire, John; Meadows, Sarah; Moller, Henrik; Saunders, Caroline; Fukuda, Yuki (2008)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The core of the ARGOS research design is a longitudinal panel study of New Zealand farms (including orchards in the case of the kiwifruit sector). Panels of 12 farms were selected to represent conventional, integrated and organic management for the sheep/beef sector, Kiwigreen, gold and organic green management for the kiwifruit sector, and conventional and organic management for the dairy sector. The research involves gathering data on these farms in order to assess the nature and effects of production from these different management systems from environmental, economic and social points of view. A survey in 2005 provided the means to examine general farmer attitudes and practices and to assess what differences may occur in the different sectors and for farms under different management systems. It also provided the means to show that the panels were reasonably representative of the sectors to which they belong. The ARGOS research design included a second survey in 2008 in order to test and elaborate on emerging research results. This report is the first presentation of the 2008 results.The questions asked of farmers were sourced from contributions from the team of ARGOS researchers drawing on results and issues in the literature, and from contemporary farming issues. These sources provided too many questions for one questionnaire. Accordingly, two questionnaires were used, one sent to a simple random sample of all New Zealand farmers and the other sent to separate random samples of each of the main farming sectors, namely sheep/beef, dairy and horticulture. The two surveys generated a large data set. In order to make the results easier to comprehend we have presented them in two separate outputs, as follows: 1. Analysis of the three main sectors (sheep/beef, dairy and horticulture) and the three main management systems (conventional, integrated and organic) (this report). 2. Analysis of agriculture generally (see companion report).

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  • Causal mapping of ARGOS dairy farms and comparisons to sheep/beef farms

    Fairweather, John; Hunt, Lesley; Rosin, Chris; Campbell, Hugh (2008)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The Agriculture Research Group On Sustainability (ARGOS) is investigating the social, environmental and economic consequences of different management systems in different farming sectors in New Zealand (for more information visit www.argos.org.nz). The sectors being studied include kiwifruit, sheep/beef and dairy, and the systems being studied include conventional, integrated and organic management. Twelve farms under each system are being studied. As part of the ARGOS social objective, causal mapping was used to document how the participating dairy farmers described and explained the factors involved in their farming systems, broadly defined to include economic, social and environmental factors. Participants identified which factors in the 41 provided were important to the management and performance of their farms and linked these together in the form of a map.

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  • New Zealand Pastoral Farmers and the Mitigation of Greenhouse Gases in the Agricultural Sector

    Rosin, Chris; Cooper, Mark; MacKenzie, Angela; Maegli, Tanja (2008)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The implementation of an emissions trading scheme (ETS) as a policy instrument is intended to contribute to the efficient reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in New Zealand within the limits agreed to in the Kyoto Protocol. The ETS provides the mechanism through which ‘emissions units’ equal to the committed level of carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2e) can be allocated among the sectors of the New Zealand economy. By establishing emission units as tradable items, the ETS would create what is essentially a new commodity that demands inclusion in the financial planning strategies of producers of goods and services. In this manner, the ETS is expected to incentivise the incorporation of GHGs within production strategies. The transition to a carbon economy may, however, prove more difficult than the mere extension of accounting procedures to expenditures of GHG emissions and sequestration of carbon. The conceptual process of envisioning carbon equivalents (both emitted and sequestered forms) has been hampered by at least two factors. First, because the New Zealand economy has experienced an intensification of emissions-generating economic production since agreeing to the Kyoto Protocol, compliance with limits on GHG emissions has largely been represented as an additional cost as producers struggle to compensate for liabilities. In addition, commonly recognised alternatives to the purchase of emissions units (including tree planting) often involve a reduction in production intensity that does not conform to existing understandings of good business practice. Such complicating factors operate with similar impact on industrial and agricultural production.

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  • Decolonising Cities (Postscript II)

    Jones, Rhys (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

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  • Rauringa Raupa: Recruitment and retention of Māori in the health and disability workforce

    Ratima, M; Brown, R; Garrett, N; Wikaire, Erena; Ngawati, R; Aspin, C; Potaka, U (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Technical support to EU strategy on invasive species (IAS) - Assessment of the impacts of IAS in Europe and the EU (final module report for the European Commission)

    Kettunen, M; Genovesi, P; Gollasch, S; Pagad, Shyama; Starfinger, U; Ten Brink, P; Shine, C (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This assessment provides a picture of the different environmental, social and economic costs and benefits of invasive alien species (IAS) in Europe, constituting the first full assessment of all types of IAS impacts at the pan-European scale. The report is part of the work led by IEEP to support the development of the EU Strategy on IAS.

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  • Technical support to EU strategy on invasive species (IAS) – Policy options to control the negative impacts of IAS on biodiversity in Europe and the EU. Final report for the European Commission

    Shine, C; Kettunen, M; Genovesi, P; Gollasch, S; Pagad, Shyama; Starfinger, U (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This assessment identifies policy measures available to minimise damage of invasive alien species (IAS) to European biodiversity in an efficient and cost-effective manner. It also provides preliminary insights on the feasibility of different policy approaches in the EU context. The report is part of the work led by IEEP to support the development of the EU Strategy on IAS.

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  • Targeted Recruitment Strategies For the Child and Adolescent Mental Health and Addictions Workforce, with a Māori and Pacific Focus.

    Faleafa, M; Cargo, Tania (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background Māori and Pacific people in New Zealand have youthful populations that experience high levels of mental illness but have low access to treatment. There is a failure of current mental health delivery systems to adequately provide responsive and accessible services to these fastgrowing population groups. There are low numbers of Kaupapa Māori and Pacific services serving children and adolescents with mental health and addiction issues. The significantly low number of Māori and Pacific clinicians working in child and adolescent mental health is also a major contributing factor (Bir et al., 2007; Ramage et al., 2005).

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  • Do alcohol and aquatics mix? The context of youth alcohol consumption and aquatic recreation

    Moran, Kevin; Mills, C (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Executive Summary   Background WaterSafe Auckland Inc (WAI), Alcohol Healthwatch (AHW), Auckland City Communities Living Injury Free (CLIF), Auckland City Community Action on Youth and Drugs (CAYAD) and Youthtown jointly conducted a research project examining the context in which youth alcohol consumption and aquatic recreation occurs given the recent rise in alcohol related youth drownings. The purposes of this project were threefold: 1) to ascertain the personal experiences and observations of youth with regards to the use of alcohol, in on and around water; 2) to examine the contexts, both social and situational, in which alcohol consumption and aquatic activity occurred; 3) To identify at risk behaviours and make recommendations to promote safe practice among youth around water and when engaged in aquatic recreation.

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  • Catalog of Mount St. Helens 2004-2005 Tephra Samples with Major and Trace-element Geochemistry

    Rowe, Michael; Thornber, CR; Gooding, DJ; Pallister, JS (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This open-file report presents a catalog of information about 135 ash samples along with geochemical analyses of bulk ash, glass and individual mineral grains from tephra deposited as a result of volcanic activity at Mount St. Helens, Washington, from October 1, 2004 until August 15, 2005. This data, in conjunction with that in a companion report on 2004–2007 Mount St. Helens dome samples by Thornber and others (2008a) are presented in support of the contents of the U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1750 (Sherrod and others, ed., 2008). Readers are referred to appropriate chapters in USGS Professional Paper 1750 for detailed narratives of eruptive activity during this time period and for interpretations of sample characteristics and geochemical data presented here. All ash samples reported herein are currently archived at the David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Washington. The Mount St. Helens 2004–2005 Tephra Sample Catalogue along with bulk, glass and mineral geochemistry are tabulated in 6 worksheets of the accompanying Microsoft Excel file, of2008-1131.xls. Samples in all tables are organized by collection date. Table 1 is a detailed catalog of sample information for tephra deposited downwind of Mount St. Helens between October 1, 2004 and August 18, 2005. Table 2 provides major- and trace-element analyses of 8 bulk tephra samples collected throughout that interval. Major-element compositions of 82 groundmass glass fragments, 420 feldspar grains, and 213 mafic (clinopyroxene, amphibole, hypersthene, and olivine) mineral grains from 12 ash samples collected between October 1, 2004 and March 8, 2005 are presented in tables 3 through 5. In addition, trace-element abundances of 198 feldspars from 11 ash samples (same samples as major-element analyses) are provided in table 6. Additional mineral and bulk ash analyses from 2004 and 2005 ash samples are published in chapters 30 (oxide thermometry; Pallister and others, 2008), 32 (amphibole major elements; Thornber and others, 2008b) and 37 (210Pb; 210Pb/226Pa; Reagan and others, 2008) of U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1750 (Sherrod and others, 2008). A brief overview of sample collection methods is given below as an aid to deciphering the tephra sample catalog. This is followed by an explanation of the categories of sample information (column headers) in table 1. A summary of the analytical methods used to obtain the geochemical data in this report introduces the presentation of major- and trace-element geochemistry of Mount St. Helens 2004–2005 tephra samples in tables 2–6. Rhyolite glass standard analyses are reported (Appendix 1) to demonstrate the accuracy and precision of similar glass analyses presented herein.

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  • Catalog of Mount St. Helens 2004–2007 dome samples with major- and trace-element chemistry

    Thornber, CR; Pallister, JS; Rowe, Michael; McConnell, S; Herriott, TM; Eckberg, A; Stokes, WC; Johnson Cornelius, D; Conrey, RM; Hannah, T; Taggart, JE; Adams, M; Lamothe, PJ; Budahn, JR; Knaack, CM (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Sampling and analysis of eruptive products at Mount St. Helens is an integral part of volcano monitoring efforts conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO). The objective of our eruption sampling program is to enable petrological assessments of pre-eruptive magmatic conditions, critical for ascertaining mechanisms for eruption triggering and forecasting potential changes in eruption behavior. This report provides a catalog of near-vent lithic debris and new dome-lava collected during 34 intra-crater sampling forays throughout the October 2004 to October 2007 (2004–7) eruptive interval at Mount St. Helens. In addition, we present comprehensive bulk-rock geochemistry for a time-series of representative (2004–7) eruption products. This data, along with that in a companion report on Mount St. Helens 2004 to 2006 tephra by Rowe and others (2008), are presented in support of the contents of the U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1750 (Sherrod and others, eds., 2008). Readers are referred to appropriate chapters in USGS Professional Paper 1750 for detailed narratives of eruptive activity during this time period and for interpretations of sample characteristics and geochemical data. The suite of rock samples related to the 2004–7 eruption of Mount St. Helens and presented in this catalog are archived at the David A. Johnson Cascades Volcano Observatory, Vancouver, Wash. The Mount St. Helens 2004–7 Dome Sample Catalogue with major- and trace-element geochemistry is tabulated in 3 worksheets of the accompanying Microsoft Excel file, of2008-1130.xls. Table 1 provides location and sampling information. Table 2 presents sample descriptions. In table 3, bulk-rock major and trace-element geochemistry is listed for 44 eruption-related samples with intra-laboratory replicate analyses of 19 dacite lava samples. A brief overview of the collection methods and lithology of dome samples is given below as an aid to deciphering the dome sample catalog. This is followed by an explanation of the categories of sample information (column headers) in Tables 1 and 2. A summary of the analytical methods used to obtain the geochemical data in this report introduces the presentation of major- and trace-element geochemistry of 2004–7 Mount St. Helens dome samples in table 3. Intra-laboratory results for the USGS AGV-2 standard are presented (tables 4 and 5), which demonstrate the compatibility of chemical data from different sources.

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  • Ecosystem Principles, Local Indicators and Legislative Processes for Delivering Sustainable Development

    Knight-Lenihan, Stephen (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report discusses the following topics: 1. The possibility of using a set of ecosystem principles to (a) assess planning processes and (b) draft up ecological indicators as part of a sustainable development programme. This is the substantive part of this report. 2. The use of schools as (a) a proxy measure of the extent to which a local community is addressing sustainable development; (b) a conduit to help identify what information collected by Statistics New Zealand would be useful at a local level; and (c) a measure of the extent to which individual sector programmes operating at a local level could be integrated, or could be better integrated. 3. Some key issues regarding selected legislation and sustainable development. The objective is to provide an overview on the above topics as a contribution to SNZ’s preparation of a sustainable development statistical framework, to be completed by 2009. Further research into any or all of the topics above can be undertaken at a later date if SNZ feels this is necessary.

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  • Referen©ite

    Carrie, Douglas (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Referen©ite is The University of Auckland's official academic referencing resource. Its main purpose is to encourage students to correctly reference the sources they use in written work. To do this Referen©ite: Promotes the meaningfulness of referencing practice: it is not mere institutional compliance - the values at the core of the practice are shared across cultures; Provides tools and information to make the correct referencing of sources significantly easier - to virtually eliminate any excuse that it is too difficult or confusing; Provides 24/7 access to referencing information delivered in an engaging, efficient and student-centred format via a single simple url (www.cite.auckland.ac.nz); through the site's own content and also by acting as a central 'hub' for excellent online referencing resources. We welcome your views and comments via the 'send feedback' link at the bottom of the page. We also invite you to place a link to this resource on your own website. Referen©ite was created by Jenny Marshall (Online Resource Coordinator for the Student Learning Centre) from an original idea conceived by Emmanuel Manalo (Head of the Student Learning Centre). Referen©ite was launched early in 2007 and in December that year received the inaugural 'Award for Outstanding Academic Integrity Resource' at the Asia-Pacific Conference on Academic Integrity. Subsequently Referen©ite was adopted as The University of Auckland's main referencing resource. At this point the website was further developed by a team comprising: Doug Carrie, Tony Chung, Craig Housley, Emmanuel Manalo, Jenny Marshall, Lynne Mitchell, and Megan Sutton. The website team also acknowledges the invaluable assistance of: Jenny Buxton, Fiona Gregory, Andrew Lavery, Chris Peck, Louis Ranjard, Sophie Reissner-Roubicek, Victoria Trembath, Glenis Wong-Toi, and Sarah Wright.

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  • Role development and career progression for New Zealand Medical Radiation Technology

    Yielder, Jill; Sinclair, T; Murphy, F (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Semiparametric Efficient Estimation in Threshold Regression

    Yu, Ping (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Council Statement on Cultural Competence

    Bacal, Kira; Jansen, P (2008-03)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The code of practice on cultural competence outlines the attitudes, knowledge and skills expected of oral health practitioners in their dealings with all patients.

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  • Kua whakawhenua te purapura, ka puawai te taonga: The seed has been planted the treasure now flowers. Addressing the social and emotional needs of infants in Counties Manukau District Health Board.

    Merry, S; Wouldes, T; Elder, H; Guy, D; Faleafa, M; Cargo, Tania (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    INTRODUCTION Over the past 30 years an increased understanding of child development has occurred through the convergence of information in a broad range of scientific disciplines that include neurobiology, genetics, developmental psychology and psychopathology, education, epidemiology, anthropology and sociology. Through the integration of research in these areas we have come to have a deeper appreciation of: (1) the importance of early life experiences, and how they interact with genes to affect the development of the brain and human behaviour; (2) the importance of the development of complex emotions and social skills during the first few years of life; (3) the pivotal role that early relationships play in developmental adaptation or dysfunction; (4) the importance of considering ethnicity and family culture in the assessment of developmental competencies; (4) and perhaps most importantly the ability to increase the odds of favourable developmental outcomes through planned interventions during infancy and early childhood [4].

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