137 results for Report, 2008

  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

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  • Establishing dedicated education units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report

    Jamieson, I.; Hale, J.; Sims, D.; Casey, M.; Whittle, R.; Kilkenny, T. (2008)

    Report
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This report presents a summary of a collaborative research project undertaken by the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT) School of Nursing and the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) to enhance the experience of pre-registration nursing students in clinical placements during the Bachelor of Nursing programme. The project was undertaken to address issues surrounding the quality and nature of clinical experience in environments where high levels of patient acuity, staffing shortages and changes have become commonplace. As a result a different approach to clinical learning was trialled based on the Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) model developed in Australia. The results of that trial are documented in this report. Over-arching themes of supporting clinical learning and relationship building were identified.

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  • Technical support to EU strategy on invasive species (IAS) - Assessment of the impacts of IAS in Europe and the EU (final module report for the European Commission)

    Kettunen, M; Genovesi, P; Gollasch, S; Pagad, Shyama; Starfinger, U; Ten Brink, P; Shine, C (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This assessment provides a picture of the different environmental, social and economic costs and benefits of invasive alien species (IAS) in Europe, constituting the first full assessment of all types of IAS impacts at the pan-European scale. The report is part of the work led by IEEP to support the development of the EU Strategy on IAS.

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  • Technical support to EU strategy on invasive species (IAS) – Policy options to control the negative impacts of IAS on biodiversity in Europe and the EU. Final report for the European Commission

    Shine, C; Kettunen, M; Genovesi, P; Gollasch, S; Pagad, Shyama; Starfinger, U (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This assessment identifies policy measures available to minimise damage of invasive alien species (IAS) to European biodiversity in an efficient and cost-effective manner. It also provides preliminary insights on the feasibility of different policy approaches in the EU context. The report is part of the work led by IEEP to support the development of the EU Strategy on IAS.

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  • Semiparametric Efficient Estimation in Threshold Regression

    Yu, Ping (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Social Ecology of New Technologies and Haemophilia in NZ — A Bleeding Nuisance revisited

    Park, Julie; York, Deon (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research builds on previous studies conducted by the “Living with haemophilia” researchers over the past decade in New Zealand. The current study investigates the implications of new treatments, new technologies, and changes in health care for people and families with haemophilia and those who care for them, in the context of everyday living with haemophilia. The research design used semi-structured face-to-face interviews and/ or telephone interviews with 37 people, and participantobservation at a range of haemophilia gatherings. We asked people to share with us their perceptions and/ or experience of prenatal genetic diagnosis, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, gene therapy, and new treatments for hepatitis C, as well as their everyday experiences with haemophilia. The study design and the reasons we undertook it are described in the introduction. The first substantive section highlights the everyday issues of living with haemophilia as a bleeding disorder. The second discusses the organisational ecology of haemophilia. The third traverses issues concerning haemophilia as a genetic disorder, passed down the generations, and the final section explores the presence of hepatitis C in the haemophilia community. In the conclusions we note that there are still some difficulties around the timely diagnosis of haemophilia. However, treatment for many people has changed from on-demand to prophylaxis and from the provision of blood products to recombinant products. These technologies have had significant effects on perceptions of the seriousness of haemophilia, on the safety of products, on daily living, and on relationships with the treatment sources: from products made from donations, to those manufactured by multinational pharmaceutical companies. There was a high level of awareness of the costs of treatment, compared to the earlier studies. The formation of a National Haemophilia Management Group, which was a result of years of work between the Haemophilia Foundation of New Zealand (HFNZ), medical experts, and Ministry of Health officials, was a very welcome development in 2006. The HFNZ continues play an important part in many people’s lives. Despite a continuing emphasis on women as carriers, there is a greater realisation that men, too, pass on haemophilia, and that women can suffer from bleeding problems. Parents were exercised by the timing of when to tell their daughters about their carrier status, but carrier testing very seldom incurs the long delays of earlier years. Issues around carrying haemophilia on and reproductive choice are handled with great care in this community. A wide range of views were encountered, tempered by respect for the positions of others. Discussion of gene therapy was a little passé in this community, as it had been on an ever-moving horizon for many years, and because new alternative treatments were seemingly offering considerable benefits. However, gene therapy was not dismissed as a future possibility. Hepatitis C has had important effects on this community and on the individuals within it: effectively there is a hep C generation and a post-hep C generation. It was heartening that those undergoing the most recent form of treatment appeared to be experiencing better outcomes, although the treatment itself was gruelling. At the end of this research period, a Government announcement of acknowledgement, compensation and treatment was made, fulfilling a decade and a half of struggle for recognition of harm.

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  • Validation of mtDNA control-region sequences in GenBank for large baleen whales

    Ross, Howard; Shearman, Helen (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The phylogenetic methods in DNA Surveillance, in conjunction with the curated reference sequence alignments known as Witness for the Whales, were used to assign species identities to the 922 sequences from baleen whales published in Genbank prior to 2007. Of these, 42 sequences were identified as belonging to a different species, and 44 to a different subspecies, from that recorded in Genbank. Fourteen blue whale sequences could not be assigned to a subspecies. A species identity could not be assigned unambiguously to seven sequences. A small number of sequences had evidence of poor or unreliable quality, but in each case the species identity as recorded in Genbank was confirmed here. Taxonomic revision is probably the greatest source of disagreement in the identities given by Genbank and DNA Surveillance. To provide better validation of sample origin, all major geographic regions need to be represented for each species in the reference data sets

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  • Normal humanness, change and power in human assisted reproductive technology: an analysis of the written public submissions to the New Zealand Parliamentary Health Committee in 2003

    Park, Julie, 1947; McLauchlan, Laura; Frengley, Elizabeth (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Assisted human reproduction legislation has provoked wide-ranging debate in all those societies that have enacted it. New Zealand is no exception. The public submissions to the Parliamentary Health Committee on the Human Assisted Reproductive Technologies (HART) Bill and Supplementary Order Paper 80 provided an opportunity to consider how those who wrote submissions conceptualised important aspects of being human. Using an anthropological discourse analysis approach, the authors analysed the New Zealand submissions. One reviewer comments: “The work provides important further information on the wider topic of cultural understandings of innovative technologies in New Zealand society”; another wrote “contemporary, contentious and of great public concern ... it opens up the topic for further research”. The public submissions made to the Parliamentary Health Committee on the Human Assisted Reproductive Technologies (HART) Bill and Supplementary Order Paper 80 are analysed in this report. Within this corpus, five major themes are identified: normality, humanness, natural versus social constructs, moral decline, and rights and power. The report is organised on the basis of these overlapping themes. Running throughout these five very general themes were two major discourses: one Christian-identified; the other, medical-scientific. A minor discourse of disability rights was also present. Many submissions, from all three of the modes of discourse, expressed fear that assisted human reproductive (AHR) technologies were challenging the boundaries of normality. AHR technologies were seen in many submissions as potentially opening a door to eugenics and the commodification of humans. Such submissions often requested the establishment of more strict regulatory frameworks. The natural order lying behind kinship relations was seen to be greatly challenged by AHR in some submissions, particularly those which were Christianidentified. Many such submissions viewed the HART legislation as part of a general moral decline of society. While some submissions viewed AHR technology as distinctly unnatural, others asserted the naturalness of the human use and development of technology. The desire to have children was cast as natural throughout the submissions. The right of offspring to know their origins emerged as a key issue. Questions of whether the production of children was a right or a privilege, and whether AHR was a constraint or a support, also emerged from the submissions. Adherence to human rights was seen as fundamental within the submissions, with differing conclusions about the correct use of AHR technologies, influenced by whether the authors viewed personhood as being established at conception or at some later developmental stage. Placing our research into an international context, we note that the limited use of scientific (both social and bio-medical) evidence within the New Zealand debates contrasts greatly with the extensive use of such evidence within British Parliamentary debates. Other aspects of the submissions appear to be unique to New Zealand, including the emphasis upon the importance of whakapapa (genealogy) in the establishment of identity.

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  • Parametric Optimal Testing: Theory and Applications

    Yu, Ping (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper puts forward a uniÖed framework for asymptotically optimal tests in parametric models and applies the new theory to two tests. The Örst test is a classical test in locally asymptotically normal (LAN) models, but the assumptions are weakened and a lacuna in the literature is Ölled. The second test concerns the location of the threshold point. The main result here is that the optimal test in the weighted average power sense is based on the posterior odds which depends on the prior on the local parameter space and is not unique. Furthermore, the likelihood ratio test is not asymptotically equivalent to the posterior odds and there is a discrete component in its asymptotic distribution. Since the asymptotic distribution of the posterior odds is not pivotal to the true value under the null hypothesis, a parametric bootstrap is used to Önd asymptotic critical values. The results in the second test are very di§erent from those in classical LAN models.

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  • Multiplying and dividing: tuberculosis in Canada and Aotearoa New Zealand

    Littleton, Judith; Park, Julie, 1947; Herring, Ann, 1951; Farmer, Tracy (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This is an edited volume. Part 1, comprising six articles, addresses dimensions of contemporary public health approaches to TB, Part 2, comprising five articles, analyses historical policies that contributed to disproportionately high levels of TB among indigenous people in both nations, and Part 3, five articles, presents experiencenear accounts of individuals, families and communities coping with TB in daily life. The individual studies speak to the power of ethnography and ethnohistory in analysing infectious disease and the societies in which it exists. Multiplying and Dividing brings together the work of two multi-disciplinary research groups located in Canada and New Zealand who discovered that they were working along similar lines in their research on historical and contemporary tuberculosis in their respective countries. The volume, the outcome of a joint workshop in Canada in 2006, shows the multiple realities that make up the experience of TB for nations, communities, and individuals. Tb can divide communities, but in some circumstances unites them in a quest for eradication. The social and epidemiological research undertaken into TB exposes social divisions and inequalities in these two postcolonial societies

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  • Automated storage network capacity management utilizing simulation and optimization

    O’Sullivan, Michael; Walker, Cameron (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    There is a wealth of research on storage systems, focusing on the storage system architecture, intelligent use of storage resources, and mass storage systems. However, very little research looks at a key component of centralized storage systems, the physical fabric of the network that holds the storage system together. “Best practice” frameworks for the management of storage systems exist, but the design of the network fabric within storage systems has relied heavily on the knowledge and expertise of storage systems architects, administrators and managers. In this paper we present the Network Capacity Management Cycle (NCMC), a new framework for network capacity management. This framework is unique because it was developed around wellestablished Operations Research methods, namely simulation and optimization. Applying these methods to the network fabric of storage systems allows a majority of the framework to become automated, significantly reducing the workload for storage systems architects, administrators and managers. The NCMC utilizes cutting-edge network discovery and monitoring tools, leading network simulation software and new methods for network capacity design. We describe each of the steps of the NCMC in detail and discuss how to automate almost all of these steps. A case study is also presented that demonstrates one iteration of the NCMC applied to an existing storage system in the Department of Engineering Science at the University of Auckland. In addition to illustrating the steps of the process, this case study also outlines the numerous complications we have encountered in our initial use of the NCMC.

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  • Federated Searching and diverse subject areas in academic tertiary libraries: a study at database level

    Newton-Wade, Vanessa (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Searching online databases is a task tertiary students are commonly required to undertake when completing their academic work, and can often be a somewhat tedious process. Federated searching products appear to mitigate the tedium of this process by reducing the number of times a search needs to be repeated. This study aims to investigate the information needs of undergraduate history and medical students, what type of search results they prefer and their attitudes to the concept of a federated search engine. Twelve students were interviewed, six from each subject. A semi-structured interview method was used for data collection. Results showed that the information needs of both groups of students are similar, as are the techniques they use to conduct and refine their searches. There was no correlation between the subject studied and the type of results preferred (specific or broad), but significant differences were found in the attitudes of the two groups of students to a federated search product. Implications of these findings on the suitability of a federated search in a tertiary academic library setting are discussed, along with the implications these findings have for information literacy. Suggestions are made for further research.

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  • Boat electrofishing survey of common smelt and common bullies in the Ohau Channel

    Brijs, Jeroen; Hicks, Brendan J.; Bell, Dudley G. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    We conducted a boat electrofishing survey of the Ohau Channel, which flows from Lake Rotorua to Lake Rotoiti, on 13 December 2007. The purpose of the survey was to investigate the longitudinal pattern in densities of common smelt (Retropinna retropinna) and common bullies (Gobiomorphus cotidianus) along the Ohau Channel. We caught 1,267 fish comprising three native fish species and two introduced fish species in 1.58 km of fished distance at a total of 10 sites. Native species caught were the common smelt, common bully and longfinned eel (Anguilla dieffenbachii) and introduced species were rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and goldfish (Carassius auratus). Assuming that the bow-mounted anodes effectively fished a 4 m swath then the total area fished was 6,328 m2 (0.632 ha). Common smelt densities varied among the 10 different sites in the Ohau Channel ranging from 0 to 10.6 fish 100 m-2. Smelt density was higher at the upstream end of the channel near the weir at the Lake Rotorua outlet, decreasing with increasing distance from the weir. Smelt were found in the littoral zones but were not caught in mid-channel habitats. In the upstream reaches of the Ohau Channel, directly below the weir, a high number of juveniles (4.4 fish 100 m-2) were captured compared to the amount of juveniles captured at the other sites (0 – 1.2 fish 100 m-2). Common bully densities varied among the 10 different sites in the Ohau Channel ranging from 0.2 to 58.3 fish 100 m-2. No longitudinal pattern in the distribution of common bullies was evident along the channel. The highest densities were found halfway along the Ohau Channel where there was an abundance of dense macrophyte beds. Common bully densities were found to be much higher in the edge habitats with macrophyte beds compared to the mid-channel habitats and the willow edge habitat where there were relatively low densities. Size frequency data shows that there is generally a higher proportion of small bullies than larger ones suggesting that recruitment is occurring. Both adult and juvenile rainbow trout were observed in the Ohau Channel. Most of these individuals were found in the upstream section of the channel below the weir and ranged from a 75 mm juvenile to a fully grown adult about 500 mm long. Large longfinned eels were also captured and were only found in the downstream section of the Ohau Channel in willow-dominated edges. In the bottom third section of the channel, near the possible artificial embayment, goldfish were present.

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  • BioFish survey of Lake Taupo, 2006

    McBride, Chris G.; Hamilton, David P.; Gibbs, Max M.; White, Paul; Stewart, Louise (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report provides details of a “BioFish” survey of Lake Taupo conducted in 2006. This first BioFish survey of Lake Taupo was initiated in late 2004 and continued until autumn (May) of 2005 (Hamilton et al. 2005). The 2004-5 survey involved deployment of the BioFish along a transect that commenced near the outlet of Lake Taupo, progressed south-west to ‘Station A’, a deep central site near the middle of the lake, and then north-west to include shallower lake bays; Whangamate Bay and Whakaipo Bay. This transect was repeated five times in 2004-5.

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  • The use of boat electrofishing for koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) control in the Kauri Point catchment.

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Brijs, Jeroen; Heaphy, John; Bell, Dudley G. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The koi carp is an ornamental strain of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio) which is believed to be one of the most ecologically detrimental of all freshwater invasive fish species. They are widespread in the Auckland and Waikato region and appear to be spreading both north and south of these areas. The presence of koi carp in 3 ornamental ponds at Kauri Point, Katikati which is located in the western Bay of Plenty region was confirmed in late 2006. Because koi carp is designated an unwanted organism under the Biosecurity Act it was decided by the Department of Conservation (DOC) that an attempt to eradicate them from this locality would occur. One possible option for eradication of koi carp in this catchment was the use of and electric fishing boat from the University of Waikato. This boat operates by putting a pulsed DC current into the water column where it attracts and then incapacitates fish, allowing operators to remove them from the water with hand nets. The Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research (CBER) at the University of Waikato was contracted to attempt to eradicate koi carp from the three ponds at Kauri Point by boat-electrofishing. The objectives were (1) to survey the fish abundance, (2) to remove as mand koi as possible in an attempt for eradication and (3) to estimate the proportion of koi carp removed from the system by boat-electrofishing. On 21 and 22 April 2008, a total of 327 fish comprising of 307 koi carp (137.5 kg of biomass), 1 goldfish(Carassius auratus) and 19 koi-goldfish hybrids were captured and removed from the 3 ponds located within the Kauri Point catchment by a combination of electric fishing (307 fish) and gill netting (20 fish). The majority of these fish (299 koi, 1 goldfish, 19 koi-goldfish hybrids) were removed from the largest pond (pond A). Boat-electrofishing caught a wide size range of koi (70 mm to 510 mm) and at least four distinct size classes of koi were apparent. The high proportion of juvenile (<200 mm) caught along with reasonable numbers of mature males and females in pond A strongly suggests that breeding is occurring within the Kauri Point aquatic ecosystem. Results from analysing scales of a small sub sample of koi (n=34) also shows that there was a wide range of ages of pond A (ages 1 to 8 years old). Pond A had a relatively high density of 4.6 koi carp 100 m⁻² compared to pond B and C which had low densities of 0.5 and 0.2 koi carp 100 m⁻² respectively. No juvenile carp were observed to be present in ponds B and C. Population and total biomass estimates for koi carp in pond A prior to removal of fish were calculated to be 358±66 koi carp and 145.14 ±44.27 kg (mean ±95% C. I) respectively. 299 koi carp or 122.30 kg of biomass (71-84% of the estimated population) were removed from pond A over two days of electric fishing, leaving a possible 125 koi carp or 67.11 kg of biomass remaining in the pond. Boat-electrofishing proved to be a successful too for removing a large proportion of the estimated biomass of koi carp in the Kauri Point ponds. Eradication of koi carp by boat-electrofishing from this system was not possible due to poor water visibility (difficult to spot narcotised carp), limited time allocated and successful koi carp breeding occurring in the ponds. Viable options of koi carp eradication in the Kauri Point catchment would involve the partial draining and poisoning of the three ponds and the associated tributaries where koi carp are found.

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  • A brief review of recent cyanobacteria monitoring results in the Waikato River

    Hamilton, David P. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Herewith is a report on possible reasons for low concentrations of cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) cells in the Waikato River in summer 2007-08 compared with previous records from 2003 to 2007. Because of time constraints, this report is a cursory consideration and does not provide the level of detail and analysis required to more fully evaluate phytoplankton succession as it relates to the complex interplay amongst physical, chemical and biological variables. This report was requested by Mighty River Power following a summer when, as a result of drought conditions, the hydro system was operated in a manner similar to 2003, when cyanobacteria blooms(>15,000 cells mL⁻¹) occurred in the upper river and water temperatures were elevated. These operating conditions were characterised by maintenance of high water levels in the hydro dams and low inflows into the system, resulting in relatively long water residence times.

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  • Lake Taihu water quality monitoring station: Technical Manual

    McBride, Chris G. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The Lake Taihu monitoring station was constructed over September and October 2007. It is intended to provide real-time, internet accessible data for the water quality and meteorology of Lake Taihu, as well as contributing to the Global Lakes Ecological Observatory Network (www.gleon.org). The system was commissioned by the Nanjing Institute of Geography and Limnology, Chinese academy of Sciences, and designed and built by Chris McBride and Professor David Hamilton of Waikato University, New Zealand, with direction from Associate Professor Guangwei Zhu, and Dr. Liancong Luo (NIGLAS). A range of high quality environmental sensors have been used in order to provide reliable and accurate observations of the climate and limnology at Taihu. The sensors were chosen for their accuracy and long-term stability, however, as with any sensor-based monitoring, regular maintenance and calibration of the sensors is essential for the collection of accurate and precise data over long time periods. This manual is intended to provide background information about the function and configuration of the monitoring system, and to act as a step-by-step guide for the proper cleaning and calibration of the sensors.

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  • Stratigraphic columns and correlations for the Late Eocene - Oligocene Te Kuiti Group, central-western North Island, New Zealand

    Kamp, Peter J.J.; Tripathi, Anand Ratnakar Prasad; Nelson, Campbell S. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report presents a compilation of stratigraphic columns for geological sections and outcrops of Late Eocene – Oligocene Te Kuiti Group units in central-western parts of North Island, New Zealand, between Port Waikato and Awakino. The columns have been prepared as part of a basin analysis investigation undertaken by the Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology Research Group in the Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of Waikato, and have been compiled into a common format from recent MSc and PhD theses to make the information more readily available, principally to assist hydrocarbon exploration activities in the region. The columns represent a level of detail underpinning a rationalized lithostratigraphy of the Te Kuiti Group presented in a companion report (Tripathi et al. 2008). This report contains two enclosures, one show in the location of columns in relation to the distribution of the two subgroups (Okoko Subgroup, Castle Craig Subgroup) of the Te Kuiti Group, and the other shows a series of north-south and west-east column correlation panels.

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  • Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2007

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2007. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community.

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  • Māori provisions in plans: Mana whenua, mauri of water, and wahi tapu

    Kennedy, Nathan; Jefferies, Richard (2008-07-31)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The intention of this document is to allow those using Ngā Mahi: Kaupapa Māori Outcomes an Indicators Kete (Jefferies and Kennedy, 2009, PUCM Māori Report 2) to view a range of examples of Māori provisions within statutory planning documents against plans being evaluated. The extracts in this Report 3 on Māori Provisions in Plans relate to the three tikanga in the Ngā Mahi report: Mana Whenua, Mauri (relating to water), and Wähi Tapu. It is intended that as we develop new kete (containing worksheets and user guides) and thereby expand Ngā Mahi, this current report will be revised to include plan provisions relating to additional tikanga.

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