143 results for Report, 2011

  • Meat Weight, Nutritional and Energy Yield Values for New Zealand Archaeofauna

    Smith, Ian (2011-01)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Canterbury and the West Coast (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Midland Region (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hawke's Bay (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in MidCentral and Whanganui (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley and Capital and Coast DHBS (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the South Island (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Otago and Southland (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Northern District Health Boards (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • Assessment of occupational noise-induced hearing loss for ACC A practical guide for otolaryngologists

    McBride, David; Gilbert, John; Baber, Bill; Macky, Margaret; Larkin, Peter; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Skaler, Tanya (2011-01)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This Guide provides practical information for assessors providing specialist assessments for ACC occupational noise-induced hearing loss clients. It includes summaries of major literature reviews commissioned by ACC on key aspects of background information, as well as references to resources to assist assessors in providing high quality, evidence-based reports. Background information on relevant legislation and specific details of the New Zealand context, including useful guidance on carrying out assessments for third parties, are included. Current versions of key forms are presented in the Appendices – specifically the client-completed history form (ACC724) and the assessment form (ACC723). Both of these have been redesigned as part of the interaction between ACC and representatives of the New Zealand Society of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery.

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  • A low-carbon energy future: Breaking the dependence on fossil fuels

    Stephenson, Janet (2011)

    Report
    University of Otago

    There is a growing urgency for a major transformation of global energy systems, both to limit greenhouse gas emissions and to achieve greater energy security in the face of resource depletions. Because of the fundamental role of fossil fuels in everyday life, most nations are largely locked into dependence. Some incremental shifts are occurring with new forms of energy and new technologies, but increasingly it is clear that a rapid transformation of entire energy systems is required, including both physical and societal infrastructures. For New Zealand the transition to a low-carbon energy future offers significant opportunities for many businesses, as well as significant environmental and health benefits. Equally it will present difficult challenges to businesses strongly dependent on existing energy systems. The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of carbon capture and storage (CCS), a premise upon which proposals to further develop New Zealand’s fossil fuel resources is argued, is as yet unproven. New Zealand may have much to gain by delaying the development of fossil fuel reserves – coal, lignite, oil, gas – for the 10-15 years it will take to determine whether, or not, CCS will become a viable long-term technology with acceptable risks. In the immediate term, New Zealand innovators can contribute globally in developing new energy technologies, but possibly more intriguing is the real potential for New Zealand to make a significant contribution to the world transformation process, by moving rapidly to a system-wide low-carbon economy. Learnings from this process could be globally significant, and many other benefits would accrue, including robust ‘clean green’ branding spin-offs for New Zealand’s products and services.

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  • Recalling management changes in the New Zealand kiwifruit sector as response to external and internal drivers: preliminary analysis of ARGOS retrospective interviews

    van den Dungen, Sanne; Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley (2011)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report presents a descriptive driver-and-response-based perspective at the family farm level. It focuses on the impacts of and the response to external and internal stress factors over the last 40 years, drawing on interviews with farming families participating in ARGOS. A historic narrative framework of a timeline (collaboratively designed by ARGOS researchers) was used to provide an overview of farmers’ response and the context in which this should be seen. The overall goal of this report was to explore potential key drivers of change in farm management among kiwifruit orchardists identified by their response to specified events (economic, climatic, etc.). This was done following the main objectives listed below: - To indentify key drivers of change mentioned by farmers over a time period between 1970 and 2010 - To identify farm management adjustments in response to identified key drivers over the same time period - To present an overview of drivers and response useful for further, more comprehensive analysis of the interviews.

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  • Employee motivation factors within a large New Zealand construction company

    Holmes, Bartt (2011)

    Report
    Unitec

    Despite the popularity of motivational research in the latter half of the twentieth century, little has been undertaken within the New Zealand construction industry and internationally little evidence exists on the motivation factors that influence different occupational groups within the industry. As construction remains one of the most people-reliant sectors, employee motivation is a crucial element needed to increase productivity. This research aimed to fill these knowledge gaps by exploring the motivation of employees working on New Zealand’s largest construction project. The research regarded the employees firstly as a single group, and the factors considered as influential motivationally, and also investigated whether specific occupational groups were motivated by differing motivating factors. The four occupational groups included in the research were Project Managers, Construction Supervisors, Quantity Surveyor and Contract Administrators. A questionnaire was administered to 39 employees. 33 responded and partook in structured interviews. The findings revealed that the respondents as a group were motivated by intrinsic rewards such as co-worker relationships and completing challenging tasks which are highly rated on Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. It was also found that Project Managers had a marked desire for intrinsic rewards compared to the three other occupational groups. Quantity Surveyors and Construction supervisors provided mixed responses, however they still identified intrinsic rewards as their most significant motivating factors. Contract Administrators were found to have a stronger desire for extrinsic rewards such as monetary rewards and job security. It was concluded that the employees of a large New Zealand construction company were primarily motivated by intrinsic rewards, and employers should perhaps base their employee motivation strategies around these preferred motivators. On a more detailed level, different motivating factors were favoured by each individual occupational group, and this should also be taken into account to improve motivation and overall productivity.

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  • Survival strategies of services subcontracting firms in an economic downturn

    Scott, Bevan (2011)

    Report
    Unitec

    The construction industry is extremely responsive to the pressures of the economic conditions of the wider economy. Between 2007 and 2008 a major economic downturn affected economies around the world. New Zealand was one of these economies and as a result of this downturn the New Zealand’s economy was pushed into a recession. The construction industry in New Zealand has subsequently suffered from a downturn as a result of this. There is a small amount research available which focuses on how firms within the construction industry adapt to cope with these external changes. However there is very little research available on how subcontracting firms adapt to survive such times. This is particularly evident of the New Zealand market. The research therefore has the objective to discover what strategies are used by subcontractors, particularly of the services trades, to survive these times. The research has been based off previous research on an earlier downturn in the Singaporean main contractor’s market by Lim, Oo & Ling (2010). The survey method was a semi-structured questionnaire of eight participants who were senior managers of subcontracting firms from the services markets. The participants were first asked demographic questions on themselves and their company followed by questions on the utilisation and importance of a list of strategies. The list of strategies was based on the findings from a literature review. Findings of the paper were that there are various strategies which are most important to the survival of these firms increasing the focus on forming relationships with main contractors’, ‘implementing stricter financial management on company cash flow’ and ‘implementing stricter site management to reduce material and time wastage’. A strategy which was also highly utilised but found to be of lesser importance as the strategies above was ‘trying to break into new sources of work (i.e. different main contractors)’. Further studies around this topic could investigate how companies implement these strategies. Research could also be undertaken into how employment in subcontracting firms is affected by economic downturns, as there was a very low response recorded by the participants to any change in employment strategy.

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  • Key procurement selection criteria of Auckland interior fitout clients: An empirical study

    Mahon, Cameron (2011)

    Report
    Unitec

    Over the past twenty years the construction industry has developed a myriad of alternative procurement routes to offer its clients. As a result of this vast quantity of options it has become imperative that construction industry clients utilise a set of well defined criteria or parameters to assess the merits of the various procurement routes available. The interior fitout sector is characterised by its tight time frames, challenging work environments where construction operatives often have to work around fully functioning offices, tight budgets, the prevalence of third parties in the form of building managers and tight budgets. Relatively little prior research has been conducted into the specific procurement selection criteria of Auckland interior fitout clients. This study’s objectives are to evaluate how influential pre defined procurement selection criteria or parameters are on the procurement decisions of Auckland interior fitout clients. The results obtained from this study will then be partially compared to the results of a similar study conducted in Australia (Thanh Luu, Thomas, & Chen, 2003). A semi structured interview incorporating a questionnaire facilitated the collection of specific data addressing backgrounds of respondents, current procurement selection practices, influence of 34 procurement selection parameters in terms of procurement decision making and open ended questions around overall impressions of construction procurement. The results show that cost related criteria and time related criteria are by far the most influential parameters in terms of procurement decision making. The findings of this study support the findings of numerous previous studies that time and cost are the primary initial indicators of project success of failure and therefore most prevalent in procurement decision making. Furthermore results from this study suggest that interior fitout clients utilise consultant advice to determine a procurement path. Responses to open ended questions indicate contradictory thinking amongst research participants as the same clients who overwhelmingly rated time and cost as the most critical procurement selection criteria feel that too much emphasis is placed on cost factors at the expense of other valid considerations. Future study could focus on how factors other than time and cost could be incorporated into procurement decision making.

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  • Project management competencies that lead to project success in the Auckland commercial construction market

    Anderson, Daniel (2011)

    Report
    Unitec

    Project Manager (PM) is a title commonly used in the construction industry and given to people carrying out many roles. Each role having its own particular skill set. This project investigated the skills required of a Client’s Project Manager that contribute towards project success within the Auckland commercial construction market. This PM represents the procuring party often referred to as ‘the client’ in construction projects. Through a review of existing literature it was found that bodies of knowledge (BOK) exist, these BOK’s outline the ‘project management approach’, which when applied is said to be able to be used internationally and across industries. Other literature reviewed outlines important competence factors for project success; being project manager’s style, the company at which the project manager is employed, and relationships between the client and project manager. The competencies outlined in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) documents are claimed by the Project Managers Institute to be the framework for project management. This research tested part of this claim and other research. Senior Project Managers working in the Auckland commercial construction market were asked to rank the various skills identified in the literature as important to project success. They were also asked to give their opinions on project manager’s style, how important company reputation is, and the importance of holding a formal project management qualification. All of the individual PMBOK competencies were quite tightly clustered in the ‘high importance to project success’ category. Weightings showed that Cost Management and Scope Management were the most important of the PMBOK areas. However, the competencies were all shown to be important. Client Relationships and the Project Management Style were also of the highest importance to project success. The employing company’s reputation was also of high importance and holding a project management qualification was seen as only of average importance.

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  • Loss estimation and data storage methods utilised by stakeholders involved in residential reconstruction - A study of the Canterbury earthquake

    Burrell, Daniel (2011)

    Report
    Unitec

    The importance of natural disaster economic loss estimations cannot be overstated. They help to assist policy maker in mitigation decisions, risk assessments and track the losses which occur due to such events. Despite this New Zealand has not employed a systematic method to estimate or record the losses which have occurred as a result of natural disasters therefore the records are poor. The Canterbury Earthquake is one the most significant natural disasters in New Zealand’s history, with economic loss occurring at all levels of the economy. There are numerous complexities regarding how to measure this loss, and what should be included and excluded in these estimates. To further complicate this there are unique factors to this event such as the government’s intervention with red zone residents. Loss estimates in the past have relied heavily on insurance information and this is one of the main sources of data for large scale events. This research aimed to investigate the estimation and data storage methods utilised by stakeholders involved in the residential reconstruction of Christchurch and compare the findings to the literature reviewed. By conducting six semi-structured interviews with Insurance and Project Management Companies operating in Christchurch this exploratory research has allowed comparisons between the Insurance Companies, Project Management Companies and the literature with reference to estimation and data storage methods. Although not all companies interviewed utilised an estimation method the research has found that there is a lack of consistency of process and method within the industry, which is in-line with the main findings from the literature. This was due to a number of factors most notably the lack of regulation within the industry and the competitive environment in which they operate. Due to the inconsistency there could be advantage in employing a systematic framework and centrally storing the information, however this too has its limitations and issues to overcome.

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  • The use of schedules of quantities in providing financial management in construction projects

    Jackson, Grant (2011)

    Report
    Unitec

    The Schedule of Quantities (SOQ) emerged after the industrial revolution of the 19th century in Europe however due to the popularity of alternative procurement methods, their use over the past 20 years has dramatically decreased. The literature noted that a SOQ is considered the most misunderstood facet of construction contracts and there is a belief by some clients that a SOQ is an additional cost that produces no benefit to the project. The misunderstanding is further compounded by the perception that a SOQ can become a key source of variations due to potential measurement errors However the literature also presented a conflicting view whereby the benefits of a SOQ are clearly demonstrated. These benefits include providing financial management in the form of cost certainty and control. Due to these conflicting views, the objective of the research was to obtain client representative feedback on the efficacy of a SOQ in providing financial management. The research method was in the form of semi-structured interviews which comprised a questionnaire collecting both quantitative and qualitative data from client representatives. The overall findings demonstrate the use of a SOQ to be effective for financial management because it provided a documented price containing the proposed scope, quantity and cost for a project. Furthermore the SOQ provided numerous financial management benefits which extend throughout the duration of the project. These benefits include a fair basis for the comparison of contractors’ tender submissions, an effective variation management tool, basis for progress payment evaluation, a useful cost database for future estimation purposes, together with other beneficial uses.

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  • Factors affecting the bid/ no bid decision making process of small to medium size contractors in Auckland

    Ma, Huan (2011)

    Report
    Unitec

    Companies must have the capability to deal with various bidding situations successfully in today‟s highly competitive construction market. The first step that the companies need to consider is whether to bid or not to bid when they received a tender invitation. The contractors‟ decision is affected by various factors and influences. This decision is highly reliant to the specific project and the macro environment. It is difficult to make this crucial decision in a short time frame by the management team. This research is looked at the factors affecting the bid/ no bid decision making and the focus group was on the small to medium sized contractors in Auckland region. Data were collected for by carrying out a face to face structured interview format, incorporating a questionnaire with eight participants. Through the course of the interview, both quantitative and qualitative questions were asked. “Experience and familiarity of your firm with this specific type of work”, “Possible contribution in building long-term relationships with other key parties” and “Current financial capability of the client” were the top 3 most important factors identified by the participants. There are many differences between the small and medium sized contractors‟ opinion for the bid/ no bid decision. Small sized contractors have very similar responses about important factors affecting bid/ no bid decision. By contrast, every medium sized contractor has nearly every different individual comment on most important factors. It is seen that medium sized contractors have stronger individual business strategy. In comparison to the literature, it was apparent that the bid/ no bid decision making is very dependent on the location the contractors are. The Marco environment is a very big influence driver for contractors‟ decisions. So, it is important that the different construction contractors should not use one standard to make the bid/ no bid decision for projects in different countries.

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