146 results for Report, 2011

  • HD Sheep Model (A-2476) Project Report October 2011

    Reid, Susanne; Bawden, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This Interim review provides a summary of the work that has been undertaken by researchers from SARDI and University of Auckland on the HD Sheep Biomolecular project over the 6 month period from 1st April 2011-30th September 2011. This report does not include data that was incorporated in the previous report unless noted. The aim of this work is to further characterize the ovine model of Huntington's disease (HD) in order to gain a better understanding of disease progression, and to establish it as a therapeutic testing system. Our objective was to develop a model that will recapitulate the progressive, late-onset characteristics of the disease expressing the full-length huntingtin protein with a moderate (in model terms) CAG repeat size. Although not yet conclusive, we have good evidence that the model will fulfill our initial objectives. Support from the CHDI since October 2009 (A-2476) has enabled the characterization and flock expansion of the sheep transgenic model, identification of the transgenic line "Kiwi" as the favored line for future analysis, establishment of tissue collection protocols and molecular/pathological methodologies for monitoring "disease" progression in the model. A limited breeding program has been initiated from two Taffy line animals that exhibit higher mRNA expression than other Taffy animals, along with detectable transgene protein in skin biopsy. Unlike the Kiwi line, we now know Taffy has multiple integration sites, explaining the variable levels of expression seen. This additional breeding will establish if a viable additional line can be generated, showing adequate and stable transmission. The Kiwi line demonstrates reliable and stable expression of the transgene and repeat. MGH capture sequencing has identified the Kiwi transgene insertion site is at a single locus in an intragenic region. Analysis of harvested brain tissues as the animal's age will demonstrate the extent to which the human disease is being recapitulated. The oldest transgenic sheep have been preserved as a result of SOC discussions, given the intrinsic value of their age with respect to observations of disease progression. A SOC decision was also made to delay the harvest of 18 month animals until 2 years, primarily based on the observation of a small number of inclusions seen in 2 of the 3 18 month animals. The decision to delay sacrifice was to allow phenotype advancement. Therefore the only animals harvested and assessed for a molecular phenotype within the time frame of this contract are 6 months old, with the next harvest scheduled for March 2012 (2 year old animals).

    View record details
  • Unintentional injuries at home: the role of alcohol, recreational drug use, & fatigue in the greater Auckland, Waikato, & Otago regions in people aged 20 to 64 years

    Kool, B; Ameratunga, S; Sharpe, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Unintentional injuries in the home account for a significant burden of injury among all age groups in New Zealand. Falls are the leading cause of injury-related admissions to hospital and one of the three leading causes of injury death in New Zealand. Cutting or piercing injuries are the second leading cause of injury hospitalisation in New Zealand. Home is the most common location for injuries resulting in hospitalisation. The impact of injuries at home among young and middle-age adults may have significant implications for both work productivity and family life. This project was designed to explore modifiable risk factors for unintentional falls and cutting or piecing injuries at home resulting in admission to hospital among young and middle-aged adults (aged 20 to 64 years). The study builds on the Auckland Fall Study previously conducted by the researchers and funded by the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). The project involved the following methodologies: a review of the published literature to identify risk factors for unintentional cutting or piercing injury or falls at home among young and middle-aged adults; an analysis of routinely collected national data on hospitalisations and deaths for home injuries; an analysis of trauma registry data for home injuries; and a multi-regional population-based case-control study, with a case-crossover component, to identify modifiable risk factors for unintentional falls and cutting or piercing injures at home among the age group of interest .

    View record details
  • Youth’07: The health and wellbeing of secondary school students in New Zealand: Results for Chinese, Indian and other Asian Students

    Parackal, Sherly; Ameratunga, S; Tin Tin, S; Wong, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report presents findings from Youth’07, the second national survey of the health and wellbeing of secondary school students in New Zealand, for the 1310 students who identified with an Asian ethnic group. It must be noted that ‘Asian’ is not a single ethnic category but a broad range of ethnic groups encompassing a wide range of cultural, language, and migration experiences. In this report we highlight the term ‘Asian’ to remind readers of the particular meaning placed on it and its shortcomings as a single ethnic category. For the same reason, the results for the two largest Asian ethnic groups in the survey – Chinese and Indian – are presented as two separate, specific reports, comparing the findings for each group with those for New Zealand European students, and with the corresponding findings from the previous survey conducted in 2001. This is followed by an overview report on the ‘Asian’ group as a whole, with the caution that these results, averaged across the combined ‘Asian’ group, may mask different experiences relating to specific ethnic groups. Overall, the majority of ‘Asian’ students reported positive family, home and school environments, and positive relationships with adults at home and school. However, Chinese and Indian students were more likely than NZ European students to experience family adversity or hardships (eg, changing homes more often, overcrowding and unemployment among parents). Compared to NZ European students, Chinese and Indian students were more likely to report positive feelings about school. Several school safety indicators have improved since the previous survey in 2001, but a small proportion of Chinese and Indian students continue to report being bullied weekly or more often, many reporting the bullying to be related to their ethnicity. In the 2007 survey, about three-quarters of ‘Asian’ students did not meet the current national guidelines for daily intake of fruit and vegetables, and 91% did not meet the current national guidelines of one or more hours of physical activity per day. Indian students reported similar levels of physical activity to NZ European students while Chinese students reported lower levels of physical activity. The vast majority of ‘Asian’ students reported good health in 2007. However, when health care was needed, many ‘Asian’ students faced barriers to accessing it, including a lack of knowledge of the healthcare system, cost of care and lack of transport. Mental health problems were of particular concern in this population, especially among female students. Among Chinese and Indian students 18% of females and 7-8% of males showed significant depressive symptoms – proportions unchanged since the 2001 survey. The prevalence of smoking, measured both in terms of ever smoking a cigarette and of smoking weekly or more often, had substantially decreased among Chinese students since the 2001 survey. In contrast, among Indian students these indicators showed little change over the same period. Drinking alcohol was less prevalent among Chinese and Indian students than among NZ European students: 35% of Chinese students and 34% of Indian students were current drinkers compared to 66% of NZ European students. While Indian and Chinese students were less likely than NZ European students to be binge drinkers, about 16% reported binge drinking on at least one occasion in the previous 4 weeks. Compared with the 2001 survey, marijuana use had declined among Chinese students but not among Indian students. Chinese and Indian students were more likely than NZ European students to report not using contraception. While the proportion of Chinese students using contraception has remained unchanged since the 2001 survey, the equivalent proportion among Indian students had declined. The majority of ‘Asian’ students reported positive and rewarding friendships, 41% reported spiritual beliefs as important, and a similar proportion attended a place of worship regularly. These proportions had not changed since 2001.

    View record details
  • Using Video Feedforward Strategies in Training: Liberian Teachers of Early Reading and Math Project

    Dowrick, Peter (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • External Review of Final Draft Samoa Primary Science Curriculum

    Boniface, S; Salter, David (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    A new Science Primary School Curriculum for the Samoa Ministry of Education, Sports and Culture has been under development for more than a year. An initial draft version was sent to external reviewers for comment and appraisal in September 2010 from which a series of recommendations was formulated as ways to improve this document. A revised final version of the Science Primary School Curriculum was produced and sent to the external reviewers in October 2011. As the external reviewers, we were asked to inspect this document and provide feedback with regards to the following general terms of reference: 1. To review and revise as necessary the accuracy of the Strands: description and conceptual schemes. 2. To confirm consistency between achievement objectives/learning outcomes for each year level and the conceptual scheme and revise as necessary where there is a mismatch. The feedback provided by external review in 2010 on the draft curriculum highlighted the need for structure and coherence in this document where the outcomes and achievement objectives were linked to clearly identified specific aims for each strand at each Year level. Also highlighted was that this document listed too many outcomes at each year level for teachers to feasibly assess as well as containing content that was too conceptually difficult for learners at the primary level. It was also stressed that the final curriculum document should be “user-friendly” for primary teachers and provide sufficient direction and guidance for teachers to be able to generate teaching programmes in science that allow all learners to succeed in learning science and learning about science. The 2010 draft curriculum document was amended and reorganised to produce the 2011 Science Primary School curriculum final draft document.

    View record details
  • Quitting behaviour in good (and bad) work places

    Markey, R; Pacheco, GA; Ravenswood, K; Webber, DJ (2011-09-01)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper argues that the decision to quit is strongly influenced by employee perceptions of the quality of the work environment (QWE), and that ignoring QWE can lead to incorrect conclusions concerning the influence of other factors on the quitting decision. However, our empirical results also illustrate that some of the antecedents of quitting, namely high levels of stress, gaining information about important decisions and changes, and changes in job satisfaction, are only significant if the overall QWE is perceived to be good; if the QWE is perceived to be bad then these factors appear to have no significant influence on the quitting intention of the worker. This paper contributes to the literature through a work environment approach to understanding the complexities of the quitting decision.

    View record details
  • Bibliography. Cultural Diversity: Issues for Social Work in New Zealand 1990-2010

    Bingham, Patricia (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This bibliography attempts to bring together research and literature relevant to multicultural and indigenous social work practice in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Bibliography. Social Work Pertaining to Maori in New Zealand: Ngā Mahi Toko I Te Ora O Te Iwi Māori 1990-2010

    Bingham, Patricia (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This bibliography is an attempt to bring together research and literature of interest to social work professionals working with Māori in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Social Work Bibliography. Working with Asian Clients in New Zealand 1990-2010 (2nd edition)

    Bingham, Patricia (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This bibliography is an attempt to bring together research and literature of interest to social work professionals working with Asian clients in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Quality ECE for under-two year olds: What should it look like? A literature review.

    Dalli, C; White, EJ; Rockel, Jean; Duhn, I (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Recent years have seen increasing participation of under-two-year-olds in early childhood education. This literature review draws together relevant research evidence to better understand what quality early childhood education for children under-two-years of age should look like.

    View record details
  • Identification in Regression Discontinuity Designs with Measurement Error

    Yu, Ping (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper studies the identification of the treatment effect by the local polynomial estimator in regression discontinuity designs with measurement error. In the sharp design, when the measurement error is fixed, the treatment effect can be identified in some special cases if the treatment is based on the contaminated forcing variable, and cannot be identified if the treatment is based on the genuine forcing variable. If the measurement error is shrinking to zero, the treatment effect can be identified with a small extra bias and without efficiency loss if the treatment is based on the contaminated forcing variable; the treatment effect can be identified with efficiency loss and a large bias if the treatment is based on the genuine forcing variable and the treatment status can be observed; the treatment effect cannot be identified if the treatment is based on the genuine forcing variable and the treatment status cannot be observed unless the measurement error is extremely small. We extend the results to the fuzzy design. The Monte Carlo results confirm the theoretical analysis.

    View record details
  • Using Parallel MCMC Sampling to Calibrate a Computer Model of a Geothermal Reservoir

    Cui, Tiangang; Fox, C; Nicholls, GK; O’Sullivan, MJ (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    We introduce a novel parallel rejection scheme to give a simple but reliable way to parallelize the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. The algorithm is demonstrated by an application of sampling the posterior distribution over eight parameters in a nonlinear numerical model of a geothermal field to achieve model ‘calibration’ from measured well-test data. We explore three scenarios using different training data subsets. Comparison across scenarios indicates model error. Comparison of one scenario with a previous least-squares estimate for the same model and data set shows that sample-based statistics give a more robust estimate than gradientbased least-squares, in less compute time.

    View record details
  • Agenda for Amazing Children-Final Report of the ECE Taskforce

    Mintrom, Michael (2011-06-01)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Regression Discontinuity with Unknown Discontinuity Points: Testing and Estimation

    Yu, Ping; Porter, J (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The regression discontinuity design has become a common framework among applied economists for measuring treatment e§ects, while a key restriction in these works is to assume the discontinuity point to be known, which is not always possible in practice. This paper extends the applicability of the regression discontinuity design by allowing an unknown discontinuity point. First, we construct tests to test whether there is selection or treatment e§ect. Second, we estimate the treatment e§ect by estimating the nuisance discontinuity point Örst. In testing, we show that our tests are consistent. Also, a bootstrap method is proposed to Önd the critical values. In estimation, we show that the estimating of the discontinuity point will not a§ect the e¢ ciency of the treatment e§ect estimator. Simulation studies conÖrm the usefulness of our procedures in Önite samples.

    View record details
  • Bibliography of Earth Science Theses

    Ralph, Gillian (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Instruction manual

    View record details
  • Bibliography. Pasifika Social Work in New Zealand 1990-2010

    Bingham, Patricia (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This bibliography is an attempt to bring together research and literature of interest to social work professionals working with Pasifika peoples in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Adaptive Error Modelling in MCMC Sampling for Large Scale Inverse Problems

    Cui, Tiangang; Fox, C; O'Sullivan, MJ (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    We present a new adaptive delayed-acceptance Metropolis-Hastings algorithm (ADAMH) that adapts to the error in a reduced order model to enable efficient sampling from the posterior distribution arising in complex inverse problems. This use of adaptivity differs from existing algorithms that tune proposals of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm (MH), though ADAMH also implements that strategy. We build on the recent simplified conditions given by Roberts and Rosenthal (2007) to give practical constructions that are provably convergent to the correct target distribution. The main components of ADAMH are the delayed acceptance scheme of Christen and Fox (2005), the enhanced error model introduced by Kaipio and Somersalo (2007) as well as recent advances in adaptive MCMC (Haario et al., 2001; Roberts and Rosenthal, 2007). We developed this algorithm for automatic calibration of large-scale numerical models of geothermal reservoirs. ADAMH shows good computational and statistical efficiencies on measured data sets. This algorithm could allow significant improvement in computational efficiency when implementing sample-based inference in other large-scale inverse problems.

    View record details
  • Food and beverage service sector productivity study

    Milne, S; Harris, C; Clark, V; Poulston, J; Luo, Y (2011-08-08)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Workplace Group, New Zealand Department of Labour

    View record details
  • Vegetation restoration plan, New Plymouth Fitzroy to Bell Block coastal walkway extension

    Coleman, Emma J.; Cornes, Toni S.; Clarkson, Bruce D. (2011)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    In 1999, the New Plymouth District Council began construction of its award winning coastal walkway. Along with providing an area for recreation, this new walk and cycle path serves as an alternate route for commuting along the city away from arterial roads. The New Plymouth District Council is in the process of extending this walkway a further three kilometres from Fitzroy Motor Camp to Ellesmere Avenue, Bell Block. This will encompass Peringa Park, Hickford Park and the Mangati Walkway, with completion expected by mid 2010. As part of this $4.2 million project, the District Council aims to restore the surrounding native duneland vegetation. The Centre for Biodiversity and Ecology Research (University of Waikato) was contracted by the New Plymouth District Council to provide a vegetation restoration plan for the Fitzroy to Bell Block section of the coastal walkway. This report considers the current vegetation of this three km section of the walkway, based on a rapid qualitative assessment undertaken in June, 2010. The target ecosytems Spinifex sandfield, flax-taupata shrubland and coastal forest vegetation types once dominant in the area are described in detail. Restoration recommendations are included to assist in the recreation of these ecosystems, including planting zones, weed control strategies and ongoing monitoring objectives.

    View record details
  • Restoration of Lake Hakanoa: Results of model simulations

    Paul, Wendy J.; McBride, Chris G.; Hamilton, David P.; Hopkins, Aareka; Özkundakci, Deniz (2011-05)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report was requested by Waikato District Council. It covers the lake water quality of, and possible restoration scenarios for, Lake Hakanoa a riverine lake situated in Huntly. The lake is used as a recreational resource by the community. In the past it has been reported to have had very poor water quality and is known to be eutrophic. It is currently in an algal-dominated, devegetated state and has low water clarity. The shallowness of this lake makes it potentially susceptible to resuspension of sediments through wind action. A community group, Friends of Hakanoa, has been responsible for the formation of a path around the perimeter of the lake, retiring about 3.6% of the catchment from pastoral farming and creating a riparian margin. Results from more recent reports and this report indicate a trend of improving water quality which may be related to recent restoration actions such as re-establishment of a riparian margin.

    View record details