145 results for Report, 2011

  • Meat Weight, Nutritional and Energy Yield Values for New Zealand Archaeofauna

    Smith, Ian (2011-01)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Canterbury and the West Coast (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Midland Region (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hawke's Bay (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in MidCentral and Whanganui (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley and Capital and Coast DHBS (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the South Island (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Otago and Southland (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Northern District Health Boards (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • Assessment of occupational noise-induced hearing loss for ACC A practical guide for otolaryngologists

    McBride, David; Gilbert, John; Baber, Bill; Macky, Margaret; Larkin, Peter; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Skaler, Tanya (2011-01)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This Guide provides practical information for assessors providing specialist assessments for ACC occupational noise-induced hearing loss clients. It includes summaries of major literature reviews commissioned by ACC on key aspects of background information, as well as references to resources to assist assessors in providing high quality, evidence-based reports. Background information on relevant legislation and specific details of the New Zealand context, including useful guidance on carrying out assessments for third parties, are included. Current versions of key forms are presented in the Appendices – specifically the client-completed history form (ACC724) and the assessment form (ACC723). Both of these have been redesigned as part of the interaction between ACC and representatives of the New Zealand Society of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery.

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  • A low-carbon energy future: Breaking the dependence on fossil fuels

    Stephenson, Janet (2011)

    Report
    University of Otago

    There is a growing urgency for a major transformation of global energy systems, both to limit greenhouse gas emissions and to achieve greater energy security in the face of resource depletions. Because of the fundamental role of fossil fuels in everyday life, most nations are largely locked into dependence. Some incremental shifts are occurring with new forms of energy and new technologies, but increasingly it is clear that a rapid transformation of entire energy systems is required, including both physical and societal infrastructures. For New Zealand the transition to a low-carbon energy future offers significant opportunities for many businesses, as well as significant environmental and health benefits. Equally it will present difficult challenges to businesses strongly dependent on existing energy systems. The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of carbon capture and storage (CCS), a premise upon which proposals to further develop New Zealand’s fossil fuel resources is argued, is as yet unproven. New Zealand may have much to gain by delaying the development of fossil fuel reserves – coal, lignite, oil, gas – for the 10-15 years it will take to determine whether, or not, CCS will become a viable long-term technology with acceptable risks. In the immediate term, New Zealand innovators can contribute globally in developing new energy technologies, but possibly more intriguing is the real potential for New Zealand to make a significant contribution to the world transformation process, by moving rapidly to a system-wide low-carbon economy. Learnings from this process could be globally significant, and many other benefits would accrue, including robust ‘clean green’ branding spin-offs for New Zealand’s products and services.

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  • Recalling management changes in the New Zealand kiwifruit sector as response to external and internal drivers: preliminary analysis of ARGOS retrospective interviews

    van den Dungen, Sanne; Rosin, Chris; Hunt, Lesley (2011)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report presents a descriptive driver-and-response-based perspective at the family farm level. It focuses on the impacts of and the response to external and internal stress factors over the last 40 years, drawing on interviews with farming families participating in ARGOS. A historic narrative framework of a timeline (collaboratively designed by ARGOS researchers) was used to provide an overview of farmers’ response and the context in which this should be seen. The overall goal of this report was to explore potential key drivers of change in farm management among kiwifruit orchardists identified by their response to specified events (economic, climatic, etc.). This was done following the main objectives listed below: - To indentify key drivers of change mentioned by farmers over a time period between 1970 and 2010 - To identify farm management adjustments in response to identified key drivers over the same time period - To present an overview of drivers and response useful for further, more comprehensive analysis of the interviews.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in New Zealand (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Adams, Judith; Reddington, Anne; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew (2011-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Children and young people with disabilities and chronic require a range of health and disability support services in order to reach their potential, and it is undesirable that a paucity of data should preclude them featuring in prioritisation, planning and resource allocation decisions. This report reviews a range of routinely collected hospital admission, mortality and survey data, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing secondary health services in New Zealand. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‘s in-depth topics consider common issues faced by the families of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, and their implications for health and disability support services. Specifically, the issues considered in these topics are: 1. Disability, Disability Support Services and Transitions to Adult Care: This topic provides a brief overview of disability, disability support services and issues with transition to adult care. It begins by briefly defining disability, before reviewing the most common conditions leading to disabilities in New Zealand children and young people. New Zealand‘s historical approaches to service delivery for those with disabilities are then reviewed, before an overview is provided of New Zealand‘s current disability support services, and the areas of unmet need most commonly identified by families caring for children and young people with disabilities, both in New Zealand and overseas. A final section considers the transition of young people with disabilities from paediatric to adult care, some of the difficulties inherent with this transition, and a range of overseas models which consider how such transitions might be improved. 2. Models of Care for Medically Fragile Children: Medical advances over recent decades have resulted in an increase in the number of medically fragile or technology-dependent. This, in combination with advances in portable technology and a trend for shorter hospital stays and less institutional care has meant that there are increasing numbers of children with complex health care needs living at home. This review examines the funding supports available, some of the inherent problems that arise from caring for medically fragile children at home, and some models of care. The section concludes with a review of transitions from paediatric to adult services for adolescents with chronic medical conditions.

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  • The Health of Pacific Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in New Zealand (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Adams, Judith; Reddington, Anne; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew (2011-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected hospital admission, mortality and survey data, with a view to identifying the number of Pacific children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing healthcare services in New Zealand. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed during the NZ Child and Youth Epidemiology Service’s (NZCYES) first three years of District Health Board (DHB) reporting. Each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four main sections: • Conditions Detectable by Antenatal and Neonatal Screening • Other Disabilities • Other Chronic Medical Conditions • Obesity, Nutrition and Physical Activity

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  • A Review of the Adequacy of New Zealand’s Regulatory Systems to Manage the Possible Impacts of Manufactured Nanomaterials

    Gavaghan, Colin; Moore, Jennifer (2011-01)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The full text is available here: http://www.academyconferences.com/pdf/nznanoreview.pdf

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  • HD Sheep Model (A-2476) Project Report October 2011

    Reid, Susanne; Bawden, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This Interim review provides a summary of the work that has been undertaken by researchers from SARDI and University of Auckland on the HD Sheep Biomolecular project over the 6 month period from 1st April 2011-30th September 2011. This report does not include data that was incorporated in the previous report unless noted. The aim of this work is to further characterize the ovine model of Huntington's disease (HD) in order to gain a better understanding of disease progression, and to establish it as a therapeutic testing system. Our objective was to develop a model that will recapitulate the progressive, late-onset characteristics of the disease expressing the full-length huntingtin protein with a moderate (in model terms) CAG repeat size. Although not yet conclusive, we have good evidence that the model will fulfill our initial objectives. Support from the CHDI since October 2009 (A-2476) has enabled the characterization and flock expansion of the sheep transgenic model, identification of the transgenic line "Kiwi" as the favored line for future analysis, establishment of tissue collection protocols and molecular/pathological methodologies for monitoring "disease" progression in the model. A limited breeding program has been initiated from two Taffy line animals that exhibit higher mRNA expression than other Taffy animals, along with detectable transgene protein in skin biopsy. Unlike the Kiwi line, we now know Taffy has multiple integration sites, explaining the variable levels of expression seen. This additional breeding will establish if a viable additional line can be generated, showing adequate and stable transmission. The Kiwi line demonstrates reliable and stable expression of the transgene and repeat. MGH capture sequencing has identified the Kiwi transgene insertion site is at a single locus in an intragenic region. Analysis of harvested brain tissues as the animal's age will demonstrate the extent to which the human disease is being recapitulated. The oldest transgenic sheep have been preserved as a result of SOC discussions, given the intrinsic value of their age with respect to observations of disease progression. A SOC decision was also made to delay the harvest of 18 month animals until 2 years, primarily based on the observation of a small number of inclusions seen in 2 of the 3 18 month animals. The decision to delay sacrifice was to allow phenotype advancement. Therefore the only animals harvested and assessed for a molecular phenotype within the time frame of this contract are 6 months old, with the next harvest scheduled for March 2012 (2 year old animals).

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  • Unintentional injuries at home: the role of alcohol, recreational drug use, & fatigue in the greater Auckland, Waikato, & Otago regions in people aged 20 to 64 years

    Kool, B; Ameratunga, S; Sharpe, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Unintentional injuries in the home account for a significant burden of injury among all age groups in New Zealand. Falls are the leading cause of injury-related admissions to hospital and one of the three leading causes of injury death in New Zealand. Cutting or piercing injuries are the second leading cause of injury hospitalisation in New Zealand. Home is the most common location for injuries resulting in hospitalisation. The impact of injuries at home among young and middle-age adults may have significant implications for both work productivity and family life. This project was designed to explore modifiable risk factors for unintentional falls and cutting or piecing injuries at home resulting in admission to hospital among young and middle-aged adults (aged 20 to 64 years). The study builds on the Auckland Fall Study previously conducted by the researchers and funded by the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC). The project involved the following methodologies: a review of the published literature to identify risk factors for unintentional cutting or piercing injury or falls at home among young and middle-aged adults; an analysis of routinely collected national data on hospitalisations and deaths for home injuries; an analysis of trauma registry data for home injuries; and a multi-regional population-based case-control study, with a case-crossover component, to identify modifiable risk factors for unintentional falls and cutting or piercing injures at home among the age group of interest .

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  • "People I can call on”: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander experiences of chronic illness

    Jowsey, Tanisha; Yen, L; Aspin, C; Ward, NJ; the SCIPPS Team (2011-03-01)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Role of the Community Health Worker in a Maori Person's Health Journey: Research Report

    Forrest, T; Neuwelt, Patricia; Gotty, R; Crengle, S (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    AIM: To explore the role of the community health worker (CHW) in a Maori person’s health journey. METHODS: A case study was undertaken of a Māori comprehensive primary health care provider from within the HCA membership. Kokiri Marae Health and Social Services (KMHSS) is a long established urban health provider based at a marae (Māori meeting place) located in an industrial area in the Hutt Valley in the Wellington (capital city) region, with a strong reputation for effectively engaging with Māori whānau (extended families). The service includes a main site, which offers activities for Māori community leadership, collective health and well-being programmes and services within a te ao Māori (Māori knowledge, resources and worldview) environment. It has an affiliate general practice service provider, Whaioranga o te Iwi, ands serve a population of approximately 12000. KMHSS health service users experience a high level of health and social needs. Primary health care team members (verbally, at a staff meeting), and health service users (direct invitation by a CHW) were invited to participate in the study. Two managers, two receptionists, two nurses, four CHWs and five health service users (patients) participated. All, except for one CHW, were Māori and all were women. TF carried out two focus groups, one with CHWs and one with other staff members, and four interviews (one joint) with health service users. Interviews were audio taped and transcribed in full. Data were analysed using a ‘constant comparative method’, to seek major themes. The researcher, service user, and academic mentors all contributed to the analysis. FINDINGS Four key thematic findings arose out of our data analysis. First, Māori CHWs provide culturally distinctive care that is person and whanau-centred rather than centred on the health system. Second, CHWs play a vital role in improving people’s access not only to health care but to social services in general, and to the social determinants of health. Third, CHWs add significant value as team members of a Māori comprehensive primary health care service, improving both service delivery and links with other agencies. Finally, there are significant challenges facing both CHWs and KMHSS, which employs them, with regard to the under-resourcing of the CHW role. Although derived from the experience of staff and health service users of KMHSS, these themes are likely to tell a more general story of the community health worker’s role in a person’s health journey within a Māori CPHC service provider. DISCUSSION Māori in this study, as is likely the case for others who experience poverty and high health need, are unable to manoeuvre in the complex systems of ‘care’. As found in previous research, CHWs are important ‘bridge’ between agencies, services, communities and people with health need. Indigenous CHWs engage in therapeutic relationships with people with whom they share community linkages, cultural knowledge and similar life circumstances. CHWs are in the strongest position of anyone in the CPHC team to hold that therapeutic relationship, if they are carefully chosen for the role. Maori and other non-profit CPHC providers in New Zealand committed to reducing health inequities employ CHWs to ensure their services are accessible, appropriate and comprehensive for populations with the worst health outcomes and lowest rates of health service utilisation relative to their need. The CHW role remains vulnerable to policy changes and funding cuts. There is a clear need to adequately resource CHWs in order to maximise their potential improve health equity for Māori through the delivery of comprehensive primary health care. CONCLUSIONS The following are three key points for policy and practice: • Greater attention to the value of CHWs, by primary care practitioners and policymakers alike, would go a long way to enhance the delivery of CPHC in Aotearoa New Zealand, particularly for the most vulnerable populations such as Maori. • There are more Maori CHWs needed, and as part of Maori health workforce development, the role could be an ‘entry point’ into the health workforce. • Maori providers are in a strong position to advocate for both the CHW role and to continue to promote CPHC by focusing on the political unacceptability of health inequities in Aotearoa New Zealand, particularly for the tangata whenua (indigenous people / people of the land).

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