116 results for Report, 2014

  • 2014 Fieldays in Hamilton: Economic impacts for the Waikato Region and New Zealand

    Hughes, Warren (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The 2014 Fieldays event over 11 –14 June attracted 119,892 gate entries which was 4.2% lower than in 2013. For the 2014 event, a total of 942 firms exhibited their goods and services (up 4.9% over 2013) including 71 overseas firms (+109%) using a total of 1366 exhibitor sites (+4.8%).

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  • Te Ao Hurihuri population: Past, present & future

    Kukutai, Tahu; Rarere, Moana (2014-07)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The NIDEA Te Ao Hurihuri series uses data from the New Zealand Census of Population and Dwellings to examine key aspects of Maori population change.

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  • Western Bay of Plenty District: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie; Rarere, Moana (2014-05)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Western Bay of Plenty District, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

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  • Storm water inflow to Oranga Lake, University of Waikato Hamilton Campus

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Hamilton, David P. (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Oranga Lake is one of three constructed lakes located on the University of Waikato Hamilton campus. It has had persistent problems of high turbidity, prolific seasonal macrophyte growths and phytoplankton blooms. Recent restoration measures of pest fish removal, sediment removal and alum dosing resulted in some improvements in water clarity. But these improvements appear to have been largely temporary and water clarity is low, reducing the aesthetic value of the lake which is located in a prominent area of the campus. This study was commissioned by Facilities Management Division of the University of Waikato to determine the extent to which inputs from the main storm water inflow to Oranga Lake contribute to poor water clarity in the lake. Discharge, suspended sediment and nutrients were sampled from the main inflow on 12 occasions. These samples related to four storm events over a three-month period from November 2013 to January 2014. Sampling was conducted with the objective of capturing periods of high, medium and low flows during three separate storm events. This was achieved on two occasions during November; however, the low-intensity, short-duration storm events that occurred in January resulted in limited runoff and were not considered representative of a major summer storm event.

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  • Women's career progression in Auckland law firms: views from the top, views from below

    Pringle, J; Giddings, L; Harris, C; Jaeger, S; Lin, S; Ravenswood, K; Ryan, I (2014-03-17)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • The built environment, Hamilton City Council policies and child driveway safety: a balancing act

    Madley, Brendan; Campbell, Maxine M. (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Driveway run-overs continue to bring tragedy to New Zealand families at a higher rate than any other Western nation. Meanwhile, little progress appears to have been made in regard to the recommendations of previous research. This project investigates whether recommendations in regard to one key factor in driveway run-overs, the built environment, are reflected in current local body policies and regulations. The research evaluates Hamilton City Council policies affecting the renovation and/or erection of domestic residences with a view to determining whether they are consistent with existing knowledge and best practice initiatives designed to minimise accidental injuries to children on driveways. The project compares the findings of a review of the existing literature on child safety best practice for the built environment and urban design of driveways, with a review of Hamilton City Council policies and guidelines relating to the built environment of residential properties and adjacent roads (the Operative District Plan, Ten Year Plan, Urban Growth Strategy, Vista, and more), along with relevant central government policy. These findings are triangulated with data from interviews with four expert informants – one child safety expert and three Hamilton City Council employees involved in planning, policy and transport – who provide insights into the translation of policies into practice.

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  • Long-term goals for the Auckland economy

    Logie, R; Maloney, TJ (2014-02-19)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • A literature review on the effects of living wage policies

    Maloney, TJ (2014-02-19)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Health effects of water fluoridation: A review of the scientific evidence

    Bardsley, Anne (2014-08-22)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Interim Report from a Perspective of the Organic Linkage between Research and the Construction of Learners??? Corpus of Japanese as a Second Language by International Cooperation

    Kondo, Reiko; Sakoda, K; Nishina, K; et al. (2014-03-28)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Can We Solve the Pipeline Problem?

    Calude, CS; Coull, A; Lewis, JP (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    A list of the most important unsolved problems in VFX production should include the word “pipeline”. Pipelines are a major source of efficiency, but they require ongoing development, and are seemingly never finished. They also resist change. Is it possible to automatically generate pipelines given desired inputs and outputs or design one “universal” pipeline that can do everything with no further modification ever needed? We present similarities between pipelines and programs, and recall metamathematical statements which show that the answer to the above question is negative. However, new approximate solutions may mitigate to a large extent this negative situation.

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  • Indexed Grammars, ET0L Systems and Programming Languages: A Tribute to Alexandru Mateescu

    Nicolescu, R; Vaida, D (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    We revise and extend a couple of earlier incompletely published papers regarding the competence limits of formal systems in modelling the full syntax of programing languages. We show that the full syntax of mainstream programming languages (e.g. similar to Pascal or CAML) and of schema based XML documents cannot be modelled by either ET0L systems or indexed grammars. We raise a few open questions related to ET0L languages and two powerful but less known classes of languages: iterative languages and generalised Ogden-like languages.

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  • Anytime Algorithms for Non-Ending Computations

    Calude, CS; Desfontaines, D (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    A program which eventually stops but does not halt “too quickly” halts at a time which is algorithmically compressible. This result—originally proved in [4]—is proved in a more general setting. Following Manin [11] we convert the result into an anytime algorithm for the halting problem and we show that the stopping time (cut-o! temporal bound) cannot be significantly improved.

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  • Free Will and Randomness

    Calude, CS; Poznanovic, N (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    It is frequently claimed that randomness conflicts with free will because “[i]f our actions are caused by chance we lack control” and “[r]andomness, the operation of mere chance, clearly excludes control”. In this paper we challenge this position. To this aim we propose a simple, two-stage, contextual (not absolute) definition of free will and we show that, relative to this definition, randomness is not incompatible with free will. Crucial for our argument is the fact that there are no random events in nature. Randomness is only a theoretical concept which is defined and produced in deterministic ways: it is not a direct cause of actions. Our analysis is relative: it does not provide a proof for the existence nor impossibility of free will.

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  • Simulation of Functional Register Machines using Active P Systems

    Dinneen, MJ; Kim, Y-B (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Active P systems are a bio-inspired distributed and parallel computation model, consisting of network of computing units called membranes, where membranes can be added and removed during the computation. This paper presents the simulation of functional register machines (i.e. a register machine model that includes instructions that can define functions and make function calls) using active P systems with the same run-time complexity.

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  • Deterministic Transistion P Systems Modeled as Register Machines

    Dinneen, MJ; Kim, Y-B (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper presents the details for constructing register machines that simulate deterministic transition P systems with rule priorities. The time complexity of the constructed register machine is polynomial with respect to the number of rewriting rules applied. We illustrate our conversion with a non-trivial example.

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  • Non-uniformity in the Quantis Random Number Generator

    Abbott, AA; Bienvenu, L; Senno, G (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this short report we present a detailed analysis of long sequences of bits produced by a Quantis quantum random number generator. We find that the output is slightly biased, and nearby bits are partially correlated with a correlation length of 2 bits. We briefly discuss possible physical origins for this, as well as possible normalisation techniques that can help correct for this ‘on the fly’, as opposed to post-processing produced bits in bulk. The non-uniformity found is small, but it is nonetheless important to understand and characterise this given the recent growth in importance of quantum random number generators.

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  • Formalisation and Understanding. A Case Study in Isabelle

    Thompson, D (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    We discuss the process of formalisation from the viewpoint of understanding. Our experience is based on a formalisation carried out in the Isabelle generic proof assistant.

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  • A Quest For Algorithmically Random Infinite Structures, II

    Khoussainov, B (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Relational Database Schema Design for Uncertain Data

    Link, S; Prade, H (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    We investigate the impact of uncertainty on relational database schema design. Uncertainty is modeled qualitatively by assigning to tuples a degree of possibility with which they occur in a relation, and assigning to functional dependencies a degree of certainty which reflects to which tuples they apply. A design theory is developed for possibilistic functional dependencies, including efficient axiomatic and algorithmic characterizations of their implication problem. Naturally, the possibility degrees of tuples result in a scale of different degrees of data redundancy, caused by functional dependencies that hold with the corresponding degrees of certainty. Scaled versions of the classical syntactic Boyce-Codd and Third Normal Forms are established and semantically justified in terms of avoiding data redundancy of different degrees. Classical decomposition and synthesis techniques are scaled as well. Therefore, possibilistic functional dependencies do not just enable designers to control the level of data integrity targeted but also to balance the classical trade-off between query and update efficiency. All algorithms are implemented in a Web-based graphical user interface that is linked to a high-performance computing cluster on which detailed experiments have been run. These do not just confirm the efficiency of our framework, but also provide original insight into classical relational database schema design.

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