110 results for Report, 2014

  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Canterbury and the West Coast (2014)

    Simpson, Jean; Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis; Reddington, Anne (2014-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report, which focuses on the underlying determinants of health for children and young people in New Zealand aims to: 1. Provide a snapshot of progress in many of the areas covered by the HSC’s Inquiry including: child poverty and living standards, housing, early childhood education, oral health, tobacco use, alcohol related harm, and children’s exposure to family violence. 2. Assist those working in the health sector to consider the roles other agencies play in influencing child and youth health outcomes in each of these areas. 3. Assist those working locally to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In-depth topics focus on the importance of the very early years, and on developing whole-of-Government, inter-agency approaches to improving outcomes for children and families. Better Health for the New Generation: Getting It Right from the Start: This in-depth topic written by Amanda Kvalsvig, explores the complex ways in which maternal health and wellbeing during pregnancy and even before conception can affect child health. The Effectiveness of Integrated Services (Health, Educational and Social): This in-depth topic written by Nadia Bartholomew, explores the effectiveness of integrated services and how such programmes should be delivered to provide optimal benefit for children and their families. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed during the first three years of child health reporting, with each of its indicators being assigned to one of four sections as follows: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants 3. Risk and Protective Factors 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants

    View record details
  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley, Capital & Coast and the Wairarapa DHBs (2014)

    Simpson, Jean; Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis; Reddington, Anne (2014-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report, which focuses on the underlying determinants of health for children and young people in New Zealand aims to: 1. Provide a snapshot of progress in many of the areas covered by the HSC’s Inquiry including: child poverty and living standards, housing, early childhood education, oral health, tobacco use, alcohol related harm, and children’s exposure to family violence. 2. Assist those working in the health sector to consider the roles other agencies play in influencing child and youth health outcomes in each of these areas. 3. Assist those working locally to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. in-depth topics focus on the importance of the very early years, and on developing whole-of-Government, inter-agency approaches to improving outcomes for children and families. Better Health for the New Generation: Getting It Right from the Start: This in-depth topic written by Amanda Kvalsvig, explores the complex ways in which maternal health and wellbeing during pregnancy and even before conception can affect child health. The Effectiveness of Integrated Services (Health, Educational and Social): This in-depth topic written by Nadia Bartholomew, explores the effectiveness of integrated services and how such programmes should be delivered to provide optimal benefit for children and their families. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed during the first three years of child health reporting, with each of its indicators being assigned to one of four sections as follows: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants 3. Risk and Protective Factors 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants

    View record details
  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury (2014)

    Simpson, Jean; Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis; Reddington, Anne (2014-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    View record details
  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Northern District Health Boards (2014)

    Simpson, Jean; Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis; Reddington, Anne (2014-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report, which focuses on the underlying determinants of health for children and young people in New Zealand aims to: 1. Provide a snapshot of progress in many of the areas covered by the HSC’s Inquiry including: child poverty and living standards, housing, early childhood education, oral health, tobacco use, alcohol related harm, and children’s exposure to family violence. 2. Assist those working in the health sector to consider the roles other agencies play in influencing child and youth health outcomes in each of these areas. 3. Assist those working locally to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. in-depth topics focus on the importance of the very early years, and on developing whole-of-Government, inter-agency approaches to improving outcomes for children and families. Better Health for the New Generation: Getting It Right from the Start: This in-depth topic written by Amanda Kvalsvig, explores the complex ways in which maternal health and wellbeing during pregnancy and even before conception can affect child health. The Effectiveness of Integrated Services (Health, Educational and Social): This in-depth topic written by Nadia Bartholomew, explores the effectiveness of integrated services and how such programmes should be delivered to provide optimal benefit for children and their families. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed during the first three years of child health reporting, with each of its indicators being assigned to one of four sections as follows: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants 3. Risk and Protective Factors 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants

    View record details
  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Southern District Health Board (2014)

    Simpson, Jean; Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis; Reddington, Anne (2014-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report, which focuses on the underlying determinants of health for children and young people in New Zealand aims to: 1. Provide a snapshot of progress in many of the areas covered by the HSC’s Inquiry including: child poverty and living standards, housing, early childhood education, oral health, tobacco use, alcohol related harm, and children’s exposure to family violence. 2. Assist those working in the health sector to consider the roles other agencies play in influencing child and youth health outcomes in each of these areas. 3. Assist those working locally to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. in-depth topics focus on the importance of the very early years, and on developing whole-of-Government, inter-agency approaches to improving outcomes for children and families. Better Health for the New Generation: Getting It Right from the Start: This in-depth topic written by Amanda Kvalsvig, explores the complex ways in which maternal health and wellbeing during pregnancy and even before conception can affect child health. The Effectiveness of Integrated Services (Health, Educational and Social): This in-depth topic written by Nadia Bartholomew, explores the effectiveness of integrated services and how such programmes should be delivered to provide optimal benefit for children and their families. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed during the first three years of child health reporting, with each of its indicators being assigned to one of four sections as follows: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants 3. Risk and Protective Factors 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants

    View record details
  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Midland Region (2014)

    Simpson, Jean; Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis; Reddington, Anne (2014-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report, which focuses on the underlying determinants of health for children and young people in New Zealand aims to: 1. Provide a snapshot of progress in many of the areas covered by the HSC’s Inquiry including: child poverty and living standards, housing, early childhood education, oral health, tobacco use, alcohol related harm, and children’s exposure to family violence. 2. Assist those working in the health sector to consider the roles other agencies play in influencing child and youth health outcomes in each of these areas. 3. Assist those working locally to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. in-depth topics focus on the importance of the very early years, and on developing whole-of-Government, inter-agency approaches to improving outcomes for children and families. Better Health for the New Generation: Getting It Right from the Start: This in-depth topic written by Amanda Kvalsvig, explores the complex ways in which maternal health and wellbeing during pregnancy and even before conception can affect child health. The Effectiveness of Integrated Services (Health, Educational and Social): This in-depth topic written by Nadia Bartholomew, explores the effectiveness of integrated services and how such programmes should be delivered to provide optimal benefit for children and their families. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed during the first three years of child health reporting, with each of its indicators being assigned to one of four sections as follows: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants 3. Risk and Protective Factors 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants

    View record details
  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Midcentral and Whanganui (2014)

    Simpson, Jean; Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis; Reddington, Anne (2014-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report, which focuses on the underlying determinants of health for children and young people in New Zealand aims to: 1. Provide a snapshot of progress in many of the areas covered by the HSC’s Inquiry including: child poverty and living standards, housing, early childhood education, oral health, tobacco use, alcohol related harm, and children’s exposure to family violence. 2. Assist those working in the health sector to consider the roles other agencies play in influencing child and youth health outcomes in each of these areas. 3. Assist those working locally to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. in-depth topics focus on the importance of the very early years, and on developing whole-of-Government, inter-agency approaches to improving outcomes for children and families. Better Health for the New Generation: Getting It Right from the Start: This in-depth topic written by Amanda Kvalsvig, explores the complex ways in which maternal health and wellbeing during pregnancy and even before conception can affect child health. The Effectiveness of Integrated Services (Health, Educational and Social): This in-depth topic written by Nadia Bartholomew, explores the effectiveness of integrated services and how such programmes should be delivered to provide optimal benefit for children and their families. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed during the first three years of child health reporting, with each of its indicators being assigned to one of four sections as follows: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants 3. Risk and Protective Factors 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants

    View record details
  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the South Island (2014)

    Simpson, Jean; Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis; Reddington, Anne (2014-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report, which focuses on the underlying determinants of health for children and young people in New Zealand aims to: 1. Provide a snapshot of progress in many of the areas covered by the HSC’s Inquiry including: child poverty and living standards, housing, early childhood education, oral health, tobacco use, alcohol related harm, and children’s exposure to family violence. 2. Assist those working in the health sector to consider the roles other agencies play in influencing child and youth health outcomes in each of these areas. 3. Assist those working locally to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. in-depth topics focus on the importance of the very early years, and on developing whole-of-Government, inter-agency approaches to improving outcomes for children and families. Better Health for the New Generation: Getting It Right from the Start: This in-depth topic written by Amanda Kvalsvig, explores the complex ways in which maternal health and wellbeing during pregnancy and even before conception can affect child health. The Effectiveness of Integrated Services (Health, Educational and Social): This in-depth topic written by Nadia Bartholomew, explores the effectiveness of integrated services and how such programmes should be delivered to provide optimal benefit for children and their families. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed during the first three years of child health reporting, with each of its indicators being assigned to one of four sections as follows: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants 3. Risk and Protective Factors 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants

    View record details
  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Hawke's Bay (2014)

    Simpson, Jean; Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis; Reddington, Anne (2014-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report, which focuses on the underlying determinants of health for children and young people in New Zealand aims to: 1. Provide a snapshot of progress in many of the areas covered by the HSC’s Inquiry including: child poverty and living standards, housing, early childhood education, oral health, tobacco use, alcohol related harm, and children’s exposure to family violence. 2. Assist those working in the health sector to consider the roles other agencies play in influencing child and youth health outcomes in each of these areas. 3. Assist those working locally to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. in-depth topics focus on the importance of the very early years, and on developing whole-of-Government, inter-agency approaches to improving outcomes for children and families. Better Health for the New Generation: Getting It Right from the Start: This in-depth topic written by Amanda Kvalsvig, explores the complex ways in which maternal health and wellbeing during pregnancy and even before conception can affect child health. The Effectiveness of Integrated Services (Health, Educational and Social): This in-depth topic written by Nadia Bartholomew, explores the effectiveness of integrated services and how such programmes should be delivered to provide optimal benefit for children and their families. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed during the first three years of child health reporting, with each of its indicators being assigned to one of four sections as follows: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants 3. Risk and Protective Factors 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants

    View record details
  • 2014 Fieldays in Hamilton: Economic impacts for the Waikato Region and New Zealand

    Hughes, Warren (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The 2014 Fieldays event over 11 –14 June attracted 119,892 gate entries which was 4.2% lower than in 2013. For the 2014 event, a total of 942 firms exhibited their goods and services (up 4.9% over 2013) including 71 overseas firms (+109%) using a total of 1366 exhibitor sites (+4.8%).

    View record details
  • Te Ao Hurihuri population: Past, present & future

    Kukutai, Tahu; Rarere, Moana (2014-07)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The NIDEA Te Ao Hurihuri series uses data from the New Zealand Census of Population and Dwellings to examine key aspects of Maori population change.

    View record details
  • Western Bay of Plenty District: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie; Rarere, Moana (2014-05)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Western Bay of Plenty District, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

    View record details
  • The Cookbook: A discussion on the process, pitfalls and successes of hacking an open textbook

    Pearson, Erika (2014-05-16)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This document represents the process and reflections on the creation and curation of an open source 'texthack' for a media studies textbook for students in Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific. This document is provided as a resource for anyone contemplating a similar texthack project. Suggestions on processes and issues for consideration are presented along with information about success and difficulties of this specific project. The final curated 'text' this document refers to can be found at http://mediatexthack.wordpress.com.

    View record details
  • Energy Transitions: Lighting in Vanuatu

    Walton, Sara; Doering, Adam; Gabriel, Cle-Anne; Ford, Rebecca (2014)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Lighting Vanuatu began in 2010 as a two-year project funded through The Australian Aid - Governance for Growth Programme. The primary objective of the project was to increase access of portable solar lanterns for rural Vanuatu communities in an effort to reduce their dependency on kerosene as the primary source of household lighting. To achieve this goal the project offered a supply-side subsidy for two Vanuatu NGOs (ACTIV and VANREPA) to support the distribution of 24, 000 solar lamps mainly to rural areas. The subsidy was aimed at improving bulk purchasing power by the NGO’s in an effort to reduce the price of the imported solar lights at the household level. The analysis of the Independent Completion Review (ICR), Business Case Study (Annex 1), and the Survey Data Overview (Annex 3) indicate that the Lighting Vanuatu project has been successful in enabling the uptake and awareness of portable solar lighting products. These reports highlight that the transition from kerosene lamps to solar throughout the islands of Vanuatu was both clear and ubiquitous. When framed at this descriptive level, the project certainly presents a good news story for renewable energy. The rapid transformation from a non-renewable to a renewable source of lighting within a 2 to 3 year period runs counter to many of the discussions in developed countries who struggle to disrupt the locked-in energy systems that sustain and maintain a reliance on fossil fuels. Considered alongside the slow and politically infused renewable energy debates in the developed country context, Vanuatu’s rapid adoption of portable solar lighting is precisely the kind of transitional story that many communities could only dream of achieving. However, the successful or unsuccessful acquisition and diffusion of a particular piece of technology – portable solar lamps – is only part of the story. The initial aim of the Independent Completion Review (ICR) was to identify the degree of adoption and contribution made by Lighting Vanuatu, any geographic, social or cultural trends evident in adoption patterns, any economic or social benefits, specific changes in the lighting technology used by households, changes in household practices associated with any shift in technology, and changes in householders’ perceived needs and aspirations with regard to lighting. While this descriptive analysis is essential for evaluating the success of the programme within its own terms (i.e. the ICR), the broader cultural, economic and political implications of this technological diffusion have yet to be addressed. The purpose of Annex 2, therefore, is to develop the Lighting Vanuatu story further by offering a more nuanced interpretation of the transition from kerosene to portable solar lights in rural Vanuatu communities; our emphasis and focus is different to that of the ICR, but complements and enhances the understanding of Lighting Vanuatu as an aid project. We begin by outlining the methodology used to gather and interpret the information that informs this report. We then draw on the Energy Cultures Framework (Stephenson et al., 2010) as an organising structure for describing Vanuatu’s prevailing energy culture. Next, we address four key debates to emerge from the fieldwork with the hope of encouraging a reflection on the shifting social norms and practices (economic and political) that are also ‘diffused’ with the introduction of a new piece of material culture like the portable solar lamps. The annex concludes with a comment on the implications of this analysis for future energy-related development projects in Vanuatu.

    View record details
  • Storm water inflow to Oranga Lake, University of Waikato Hamilton Campus

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Hamilton, David P. (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Oranga Lake is one of three constructed lakes located on the University of Waikato Hamilton campus. It has had persistent problems of high turbidity, prolific seasonal macrophyte growths and phytoplankton blooms. Recent restoration measures of pest fish removal, sediment removal and alum dosing resulted in some improvements in water clarity. But these improvements appear to have been largely temporary and water clarity is low, reducing the aesthetic value of the lake which is located in a prominent area of the campus. This study was commissioned by Facilities Management Division of the University of Waikato to determine the extent to which inputs from the main storm water inflow to Oranga Lake contribute to poor water clarity in the lake. Discharge, suspended sediment and nutrients were sampled from the main inflow on 12 occasions. These samples related to four storm events over a three-month period from November 2013 to January 2014. Sampling was conducted with the objective of capturing periods of high, medium and low flows during three separate storm events. This was achieved on two occasions during November; however, the low-intensity, short-duration storm events that occurred in January resulted in limited runoff and were not considered representative of a major summer storm event.

    View record details
  • Photovoltaic (PV) Uptake in NZ: The story so far

    Ford, Rebecca; Stephenson, Janet; Scott, Michelle; Williams, John; Wooliscroft, Ben; King, Geoff; Miller, Allan (2014-09)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Copyright The Authors

    View record details
  • Information Package for Users of the New Zealand Estimated Food Costs 2014

    University of Otago, Department of Human Nutrition (2014)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Since the 1970s the Department of Human Nutrition (previously Home Science Extension with the School of Home Science) at the University of Otago has conducted an annual Food Cost Survey. The Food Cost Survey is based on a basket of food designed to meet dietary needs of adult males and females (19 years and over), adolescents (11 to 18 years), school aged children (10 and 5 years) and preschool children and infants (4 and 1 years). In recent years food costs have been reported for five cities in New Zealand including Dunedin, Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Hamilton. Most healthy families or individuals will meet their nutritional needs when spending the amount of money specified as the basic costs. However, spending less than this amount increases the risk of not getting all the necessary nutrients. Many people will not lack energy or nutrients when spending less than this amount on food if they make careful management choices. However, the chances of consuming an inadequate diet increase as the amount spent to purchase food falls below the basic costs. The foods included in the survey were revised in order to collect the 2014 data. In addition, the methods we use to calculate food costs and the amounts of food allocated to sex and age groups have been updated. This means the 2014 food costs are not directly comparable to previous years. In 2014 food costs for an adult male were: Auckland $68, Wellington $69, Christchurch $71, and Dunedin $67.

    View record details
  • Inquiring minds, meaningful responses: Children's interests, inquiries and working theories. Final report to Teaching and Learning Research Initiative

    Hedges, Helen; Cooper, Maria (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Project Completion Report for the Auckland Council Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund from the Faculty of Education, The University of Auckland

    Birdsall, Sally (2014-12-12)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Te Ohonga Ake The Health of Māori Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in New Zealand Series Two

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2014-02)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The report’s focus on disability, chronic disease and overweight and obesity encompasses health issues and conditions impacting on many Māori babies, tamariki and rangatahi. In addition, these conditions often have a broader impact on education, on whānau and across the life course. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed by the New Zealand Child and Youth Epidemiology Service, with all of the indicators in the Chronic Conditions and Disabilities stream being updated in this year’s edition. These indicators have been grouped into four sections: • Conditions Arising in the Perinatal Period • Other Disabilities • Chronic Medical Conditions • Obesity, Nutrition and Physical Activity

    View record details