104 results for Report, 2016

  • Energy Cultures Policy Briefs

    Stephenson, J; Barton, B; Carrington, G; Hopkins, D; Lavelle, M.J; Lawson, R; Rees, D; Scott, M; Thorsnes, P; Walton, S; Wooliscroft, B (2016-02)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Launched in 2012, the Energy Cultures Project is led by the Centre for Sustainability at the University of Otago and aims to develop knowledge and tools to achieve a sustainable energy transition across New Zealand. The Energy Cultures 2 Project focuses on efficiency transitions in three domains: households, businesses and transport systems.These policy briefs are an output of the Energy Cultures 2 research programme, funded 2012-2016 by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. The purpose of these briefs is to assist with the design of improved policies and practices to promote more efficient energy use in households, businesses and transport in New Zealand.

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  • Resilient Communities Murupara

    Pomeroy, Ann (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Resilience is the ability of individuals, families, whānau1 (extended family), communities and institutions to cope and persevere through adverse conditions (e.g., a natural disaster or economic shock), and their ability to recover (‘bounce back’ or adjust to a changed post-event reality) and resume their lives. The period of adjustment and recovery may be weeks, but more often than not it is years, and in the case of Māori, resistance and perseverance has stretched across decades into centuries. This report reflects on what I have learned from participating in a research project looking at key factors that enable individuals, whānau, communities and institutions to cope, adapt, change and progress after adverse events. The report focuses on just one component of the whole research project: the resilience of the people of Ngāti Manawa and Ngāti Whare, who live in and near Murupara, a rural village in eastern Bay of Plenty, New Zealand.

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  • Child Poverty Monitor: Technical Report 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-12-13)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The Child Poverty Monitor and this Technical Report provide data on a set of indicators that assess aspects of child poverty in New Zealand and their implications for child wellbeing. In it are data on income and non-income measures of poverty, including measures that reflect increasing levels of severity. Other data include indicators related to health, living conditions, education, and a selection of economic measures used to assess how well we are doing as a nation that are relevant to the wellbeing of children and their families. The Child Poverty Monitor is a partnership comprising the Office of the Children’s Commissioner, the University of Otago’s New Zealand Child and Youth Epidemiology Service (NZCYES) and the JR McKenzie Trust. The purpose is to compile and share robust information on child poverty measures that are publicly available and easily accessible. Only by having the essential measures on child poverty in New Zealand compiled, published and disseminated annually can we tell how well we are progressing in effectively reducing child poverty in our nation.

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  • Fa'atuatuaga Kerisiano ma Sauaga i totonu o Aiga: Ripoti mo Tagata Lautele o Samoa i Niusila

    Ah Sir-Maliko, Mercy (2016-08)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is available in both English and Samoan

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  • Christian Faith and Family Violence: A Report for Samoan communities in New Zealand

    Ah Siu-Maliko, Mercy (2016-08)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The report is available in both English and Samoan.

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  • Listening to Male Survivors of Church Sexual Abuse

    Figueroa Alvear, Rocío; Tombs, David (2016-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is available in English and Spanish

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  • Escuchando a sobrevivientes masculinos de abuso sexual en la Iglesia

    Figueroa Alvear, Rocío; Tombs, David (2016-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is available in English and Spanish

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  • Entrepreneurial Actors in Transport Systems. An Energy Cultures Perspective

    Walton, Sara; Hyde, Abbe; Patel, Vibhuti (2016)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Moving to a low carbon economy in New Zealand requires a considerable shift in the current transport system as a whole (Carrington et al, 2014). Indeed, the New Zealand transportation system in has a number of key issues including old vehicle stock, old inefficient ICE engines, lack of rail infrastructure investment, low petrol taxes relative to OECD countries and a focus on road building (Vivid Economics & University of Auckland Business School, 2012). Given the complexity involved, shifting the current transport socio-technical systems (with the reliance on the ICE) will be difficult. Starting a business that relies on shifting such an embedded regime can thus be a hard journey. This report looks at the entrepreneurs operating businesses that challenge the mainstream and dominant transportation regime in New Zealand. They can be considered brave people by introducing new products and services into the market that challenge the reliance on fossil fuels in transportation. This report explores each entrepreneurial venture to understand their operations, what alternatives is being offered and what the barriers are to that venture. With barriers comes opportunities and these entrepreneurs are seeing and seizing opportunities that may have the potential together to shift the regime from its current form into something that is more sustainable for the future.

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  • Te Ohonga Ake The Determinants of Health for Māori Children and Young People in New Zealand Series Two

    Simpson, Jean; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis (2016-03)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report, which focuses on the underlying determinants of health for Māori children and young people, aims to: 1. Provide a snapshot of progress in addressing many of the determinants of health including child poverty and living standards, housing, early childhood education, oral health, tobacco use, alcohol related harm, and children’s exposure to family violence. 2. Assist those working in the health sector to consider the roles other agencies play in influencing child and youth health outcomes related to these determinants. In exploring the underlying determinant of health for Māori children and young people, each of the indicators in this year’s report has been assigned to one of four sections: • The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context • Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants • Risk and Protective Factors • Health Outcomes as Determinants A viewpoint by Dr Bridget Robson beginning on page 32 reflects on the findings of the report in the context of Māori economic values

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in New Zealand (2014)

    Simpson, Jean; Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis; Reddington, Anne (2016-03)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report, which focuses on the underlying determinants of health for children and young people in New Zealand aims to: 1. Provide a snapshot of progress in many of the areas covered by the HSC’s Inquiry including: child poverty and living standards, housing, early childhood education, oral health, tobacco use, alcohol related harm, and children’s exposure to family violence. 2. Assist those working in the health sector to consider the roles other agencies play in influencing child and youth health outcomes in each of these areas. 3. Assist those working locally to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. in-depth topics focus on the importance of the very early years, and on developing whole-of-Government, inter-agency approaches to improving outcomes for children and families. Better Health for the New Generation: Getting It Right from the Start: This in-depth topic written by Amanda Kvalsvig, explores the complex ways in which maternal health and wellbeing during pregnancy and even before conception can affect child health. The Effectiveness of Integrated Services (Health, Educational and Social): This in-depth topic written by Nadia Bartholomew, explores the effectiveness of integrated services and how such programmes should be delivered to provide optimal benefit for children and their families. This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed during the first three years of child health reporting, with each of its indicators being assigned to one of four sections as follows: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants 3. Risk and Protective Factors 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants

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  • Supporting group plans in the BDI architecture using coordination middleware

    Cranefield, Stephen (2016)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This is the full version of a paper published as the following extended abstract: Supporting Group Plans in the BDI Architecture using Coordination Middleware (Extended Abstract), Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems, 1427-1428, International Foundation for Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems, 2016 http://trust.sce.ntu.edu.sg/aamas16/pdfs/p1427.pdf

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  • University of Otago Open Access Publishing Survey Results

    White, Richard; Remy, Melanie (2016-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley, Capital & Coast and Wairarapa DHBs (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Canterbury and the West Coast (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections:  Issues in infancy  Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds  Conditions of the respiratory system  Common communicable diseases  Unintentional injury  Reproductive health  Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hawke’s Bay (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Southern DHB (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the South Island (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Midland Region (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in MidCentral and Whanganui (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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