4,217 results for Report

  • Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2008

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2009-03)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2008. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community.

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  • Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2006

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2006)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2006. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community.

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  • Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2004

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2004)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2004. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community.

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  • Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2005

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2005)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2005. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community.

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  • PUCM 2 Survey Results 2001-2002

    Day, Maxine; Backhurst, Michael (2002-06)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This Report contains the results from a survey of resource management consultants and resource consent applicants carried out during 2001-2002 to gain factual and attitudinal information about the plan implementation processes of respective councils. It drew on the experiences of 277 applicants and consultants representing a diversity of stakeholders, and provided a valuable check on the quality of processes and procedures of councils with respect to plan implementation and compliance.

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  • Planning and governance under the LGA: Lessons from the RMA experience.

    Borrie, Nancy; Memon, Ali; Ericksen, Neil; Crawford, Janet (2004-06-01)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this report is to identify ways in which experiences gained from the RMA as a devolved and co-operative planning mandate can enable local and central government and other stakeholders to more effectively implement the LGA. The report is based on findings from the FRST-funded research programme on Planning under Co-operative Mandates (PUCM). We argue in this report that the experiences gained from the RMA can inform effective implementation of the LGA in three important respects: Preparation and implementation of LTCCPs; The community consultation process for formulating community outcomes; and Māori participation in planning and governance.

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  • Hotspots: Exotic mosquito risk profiles for New Zealand

    de Wet, Neil; Slaney, David; Ye, Wei; Hales, Simon; Warrick, Richard A. (2005-04)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This document reports the main findings of the first systematic, spatial analyses of risks to New Zealand associated with exotic mosquitoes of current public health concern.

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  • Te Kuiti Group (Late Eocene - Oligocene) lithostratigraphy east of Taranaki Basin in central-western North Island, New Zealand

    Tripathi, Anand Ratnakar Prasad; Kamp, Peter J.J.; Nelson, Campbell S. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report presents a lithostratigraphy for the Late Eocene - Oligocene Te Kuiti Group that crops out in central-western North Island, New Zealand, between Port Waikato in the north and Awakino in the south. The Te Kuiti Group is a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic succession and includes extensive limestone development in its upper parts. The group is up to several hundred metres thick, and accumulated unconformably above indurated Triassic and Jurassic sedimentary basement. The Te Kuiti Group accumulated east of Taranaki Fault and contains a record of sequence and unconformity development that helps constrain the tectonic development of eastern Taranaki Basin. In particular, it records the timing of the mid-Oligocene transition from extension to crustal shortening. Most of the report is however concerned with rationalisation of the group’s lithostratigraphy to enable the geological signals within it to be inferred.

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  • Accidental child driveway runovers: Exploring Waikato data and the efficacy of existing responses

    Hunter, John; Poulgrain, Hayley Mills; Campbell, Maxine M. (2009)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    While the numbers of accidents are not high, there is little doubt that driveway runovers are an ongoing, often fatal and inevitably avoidable tragedy for children and their families. In many cases the driver is an immediate family member, or a neighbour or friend, which serves to compound the tragedy. This type of accident is, like other unintentional child injuries, preventable. The over-riding objective of this study is to find ways to minimise the incidence and severity of driveway runovers. We also aim to add Waikato data to the existing knowledge base. This report begins with a description of the research process utilised in this project, which combines a literature review with the collection of Waikato data and a review of available resources. Chapter Two presents the literature review, dividing the material into its different sources, then summarising the literature in terms of the three main factors contributing to driveway runovers. The following chapter provides data on Waikato driveway accidents for the period since May 2006. The type and availability of educational resources is then presented. Chapter Four evaluates existing resources and their availability, suggesting how they might be made more accessible to families. It also assesses existing recommendations and provides further suggestions for enhancing driveway safety. These again reflect the three main categories outlined in the literature – human, vehicle and environmental.

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  • Pedalling for safety: Schoolchildren and safe active transport

    Fisher, Kylie; Campbell, Maxine M. (2010)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This research will add to the international body of knowledge around safe active transport and its benefits for individuals and their communities. In order to achieve this, the report begins with a brief description of the risks associated with active transport, 3 and considers why active transport to school should be encouraged, despite the risks. Our dependence on cars is discussed in relation to the prevailing chauffeuring culture, before the objectives of the research are outlined. Chapter one concludes with an account of the methodology used to undertake this research, which combined a literature review and a search for educational resources with some participant observation field research. In chapter 2 we present a summary of the resources available to parents in Hamilton and provide a profile of the city, which is in many ways ideally suited to active transport, though participation rates are low. Chapter 3 discusses the benefits of active transport and the barriers to participation in it. Following a discussion that draws all the various strands together, we evaluate existing strategies with a view to endorsing those most likely to enhance safety, while also offering some further ideas on how to minimise the risks of active transport for children.

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  • Fish populations of Lake Ngaroto, Waikato, and fish passage at the outlet weir.

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Reynolds, Gavin B.; Jamieson, Paul M.; Laboyrie, J. Lee (2001)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    1.Lake Ngaroto has a diverse fauna of native and introduced fish. It is largest of the Waipa lakes, is hypertrophic (i.e., has very high concentrations of plant nutrients), and is highly productive for this reason. 2.In an exhaustive fish survey that used gill nets, fyke netx, and beach seining, 4,317 fish of nine species were caught. The catch included five species of introduced fish. Over 70% of the catch was brown bullhead catfish; rudd, goldfish, a single mosquitofish, and a single koi carp were also caught. In summer, mosquitofish numbers a likely to be very high. 3.Four species of native fish were caught, and of these, shortfinned eels wer the most numerous. Common bullies, a few longfinned eels, and a single common smelt were caught, thought common smelt and common bullies are expected to be much more numerous in summer. 4.The migratory species in the lake are the eels and common smelt. Eels are always migratory, as they spawn in the tropical ocean. Common smelt may be wither migratory or lake-resident, and the single individual caught in this survey had vertebral and gill raker counts diagnostic of a migratory fish. As smelt migrate upstream from the ocean in spring and summer, but are generally absent from freshwaters in winter, the low abundance in August and October 2001 is not surprising. 5.Eels are string migrators, and can climb rock faces and wriggle through small cracks and crevices during their migration. Common smelt migrate by swimming, and high velocities and free-falling water barriers can prevent their upstream passage. 6.We recommend that to all upstream passage of swimming species such as common smelt the rebuilt weir has zones with mean water column velocities no greater than 0.5 m s⁻¹, and preferably 0.3-0.4 m s⁻¹. The length of the downstream slop of the weir should be no more than 4 m, and the water depth over the weir should be at least 5 cm during the time of principal upstream migration (August to December).

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  • Macroinvertebrates and water quality: a teaching guide

    Hicks, Brendan J. (2002)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Streams support a diverse community of plants and animals on or in the stream bed. These organisms comprise the benthos. Among the benthos are worms, molluscs, crustaceans, and larval insects. Insect larvae are usually the most numerous animals of the benthos. Collectively the animals of the benthos are known as benthic macroinvertebrates because of where they live, and their large size (often 10-35 mm).

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  • Electrofishing survey of the Manawatu, Whanganui, and Mokau rivers and Lake Rotorangi, Petea River

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Bell, Dudley G. (2003)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    We used New Zealand’s first successful electrofishing boat to survey fish in three large North Island rivers and in Lake Rotorangi, hydro-electric impoundment on the Patea River. The primary objective of the fishing was to see if undesirable fish species such as koi carp (Cyprinus carpio haemaotopterus; Zhou et al. 2003), brown bullhead catfish(Ameiurus nebulosus), and rudd (Scardinius erythophthalmus) have become established in the Manawatu, Whanganui, Petea, and Mokau rivers. Koi carp are known to be present in several ponds within the Manawatu and Whanganui River catchments, and a juvenile rudd was caught by a whitebaiter near the mouth of the Mokau River. Lake Rotorangi has an established trout fishery, but European perch (Perca fluviatilis) have been illegally released into the lake, and are numerous near Stratford. This lake is also vulnerable to illegal releases of other fish species, so it was included in the survey. A secondary objective was a general survey of native and sports fish. Nine species of native fish and three introduced species were captured during the survey of 27 sites in four river systems. Fish habitat was generally poor, with little in-water obvious at the shoreline. Aquatic macrophytes were only in Manawatu River tributaries (the Koputaroa and Tokomaru streams). All three rivers had U-shaped channels with soft banks generally of clay and mud. Poor water visibility made observations difficult in the mainstreams of all the rivers. Common smelt were the most abundant and widespread fish species, and were present at all sites except those in the Tokomaru Stream and Lake Rotorangi. High water conductivity prevented effective electrofishing at Site 25 in the Mokau River mainstem, where the juvenile rudd was found. Some unexpected catches in this survey were stargazers in the Manawatu River at Site 1 and 3, 10 km upstream from the sea, and black flounder in tributaries of the Manawatu (Sites 4 and 5), up to 23 km inland. Black flounder were found in the Whanganui River at Site 13, 30 km from the sea. Rainbow trout were caught in the Manawatu River at several sites (Table 4, Figure 3). No recognised pest fish species were caught, but we cannot exclude the possibility that pest fish might occur at sites that were not fished. Despite these limitations, we are confident that our study has provided a good summary of the fish species present in the three rivers and Lake Rotorangi, and has provided estimates of minimum densities for the sites that were fished.

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  • Boat electrofishing survey of Te Weta Bay, Lake Rotoiti

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Ring, C. Alex (2004)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    We used New Zealand’s first successful electrofishing boat to survey fish in Lake Rotoiti, North Island, New Zealand, principally in Te Weta Bay. The primary objective of the fishing was to see if undesirable fish species such as koi carp (Cyprinus carpio haemaotopterus; Zhou et al. 2003), brown bullhead catfish (Ameiurus nebulosus), and rudd (Scardinius erythophthalmus) have become established. Circular excavations were seen in the lake by a NIWA SCUBA diver in late 2003, and these were similar to nest excavations associated with catfish in other locations. The native fish common smelt (Retropinna retropinna) and bullies (Gobiomorphus sp) were caught, with a few goldfish(Carassius auratus). Poor water visibility made observations difficult in some parts of the lake, especially on the southern shore and in the outer part of Te Weta Bay closest to the main lake. Fish densities ranged from 2.3 to 11.7 fish 100 m⁻². These should be regarded as minimal densities because the electroshoked fish were counter from the boat but mostly not retrieved; also, only a single pass was conducted. No recognised pest fish species were caught, but we cannot exclude the possibility that pest fish might occur at sites that were not fished. No trout were caught, possible because of the high water temperature (22°C).

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  • Boat electrofishing survey of Apata Pond and Lake McLaren

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Bell, Dudley G.; Ring, C. Alex; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2004)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    We used New Zealand’s first successful electrofishing boat to catch koi carp (Cyprinus carpio haemaotopterus; Zhou et al. 2003) and rudd (Scardinius erythophthalmus) at two sites in the Bay of Plenty, North Island, New Zealand. Five large koi carp were caught in a pond near Apata; shortfinned eels and adult inanga were also caught. In Lake McLaren, a small hydro-electric impoundment on the Wairoa River, two rudd were caught; longfinned eels (Anguilla dieffenbachii), common bullies (Gobiomorphus cotidianus), and brown and rainbow trout (Salmo trutta and Oncorhynchus mykiss) were also caught. Low ambient conductivities (43-90 µS cm⁻¹) is likely to have restricted the electrofishing field and power transfer to the fish, but fish capture was still successful. Clear water compensated somewhat for the reduced effectiveness of the field. Fish densities were low at both locations. The minimum fish density was 0.31 fish 100 m⁻² in the pond at Apata, and 0.61 fish 100 m⁻² in Lake McLaren. These should be regarded as minimal densities because only a single pass was conducted. All the koi carp caught in the pond at Apata were 521 to 564 mm fork length and all were 8 years old; there were two males and three females. One female was about to spawn; however, no other koi carp were found, so breeding appears to have been unsuccessful in this habitat. The two rudd from Lake McLaren were 203 and 240 mm fork length 6 and 7 years old respectively. Thought no younger age classes were caught, we cannot exclude the possibility that rudd could reproduce successfully in Lake McLaren.

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  • Methodology to survey and monitor New Zealand mudfish species

    Ling, Nicholas; O’Brien, Leanne; Miller, Rosemary; Lake, Michael D. (2009)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Standard methods to survey and monitor NZ mudfish species involve Gee minnow traps for adults and hand nets for earlier life stages, although a range of methods have been used. A basic assessment of fish abundance can be gained from one night of trapping, however, estimates of fish density and sub-population size require repeated identical sampling events. In developing a study the objective neds to be well considered in order that the information collected addresses the particular research question. Study design and sampling effort are usually individualised to the type of habitat being sampled and resources available. Catching fish and measuring their length and weight is straightforward and uses relatively simple equipment. More detailed examination and marking of fish may be required in some studies. From information collected in the field a range of further calculations and analyses are usually done to assess the state of health of the sub-population. Capture data should be submitted to the NZ freshwater Fish Database and habitat assessed using the Handbook for Monitoring Wetland Condition. The Department of Conservation Mudfish Recovery Group plans to regularly collate survey and monitoring information.

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  • Boat electrofishing survey of common smelt and common bully in the Ohau Channel in December 2009

    Brijs, Jeroen; Hicks, Brendan J.; Rowe, David K.; Bell, Dudley G. (2010)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    We conducted a boat electrofishing survey of the Ohau Channel, which flows from Lake Rotorua to Lake Rotoiti, on 7 December 2009. The purpose of this was to repeat surveys that took place on 13 December 2007 and 11 December 2008 concerning the longitudinal pattern in densities of common smelt (Retropinna retropinna) and common bully (Gobiomorphus cotidianus). Due to run timing and possibly low water clarity and high water flows, catch rates were lower than those found in 2007 and 2008 as we only caught 353 fish comprising three native species and two introduced species in 2.72 km of fished distance at a total of 10 sites. Native species caught were common smelt, common bully and longfin eel (Anguilla dieffenbachii) and introduced species were rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and goldfish (Carassius auratus). The total are fished was 10,884 m² (1.088 ha) giving an estimated density of 3.2 fish 100 m⁻².

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  • Systematic lithostratigraphy of the Neogene succession exposed in central parts of Hawke’s Bay Basin, eastern North Island, New Zealand

    Bland, Kyle J.; Kamp, Peter J.J.; Nelson, Campbell S. (2007)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report presents a systematic lithostratigraphy for the Neogene (Miocene–Recent) sedimentary succession in central parts of Hawke’s Bay Basin in eastern North Island, New Zealand. It has been built up chiefly from strata exposed in outcrop, but petroleum exploration drill hole data have also been incorporated to produce this stratigraphic synthesis. Most of the strata exposed in this part of the basin are of Late Miocene (Tongaporutuan, local New Zealand Stage) to Recent age, and the majority of this report focuses on these starta, with brief description of Middle and Early Miocene formations. A companion PR report (Kamp et al. 2007) contains stratigraphic columns for sections through the Neogene succession described in this report.

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  • Stratigraphic columns for the Neogene succession exposed in central parts of Hawke’s Bay Basin, eastern North Island, New Zealand

    Kamp, Peter J.J.; Bland, Kyle J.; Caron, Vincent; Graafhuis, Rhys B.; Baggs, Rachel A.; Dyer, Sarah D.J.; Boyle, Susan F.; Nelson, Campbell S. (2007)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report is a compilation of stratigraphic columns for geological sections and outcrops of Neogene sedimentary units in central parts of Hawke’s Bay Basin, eastern North Island, New Zealand. The columns have been prepared as part of a basin analysis investigation undertaken by the Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology Research Group in the Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of Waikato and have been compiled into a common format from six recent MSc and PhD theses to make the information more readily available, principally to assist hydrocarbon exploration activities in the region. The columns represent a level of detail underpinning a rationalized lithostratigraphy of the Neogene basin fill. The systematic lithostratigraphic description of the basin fill is given in a companion report (Bland et al. 2007).

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  • Ecological and physical characteristics of the Te Awa O Katapaki Stream, Flagstaff, Waikato

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Reynolds, Gavin B.; Laboyrie, J. Lee; Hill, Christopher D. H. (2001)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    1. The fish, macroinvertebrates, aquatic vegetation, and water quality indicate that the Te Awa O Katapaki Stream is an unpolluted, pastureland stream that is typical of the Waikato region. 2. The stream has very high nutrient concentrations that probably result from the dairy farming upstream. 3. The fish fauna is dominated by the native shortfinned eels. The presence of the migratory common smelt indicates that swimming fish species also have free access to the stream from the Waikato River. 4. Fish of high conservation value, such as giant or banded kokopu (Galaxias argenteus or G. fasciatus) were absent, which is predictable given the warm, unshaded nature of the stream. 5. Fish and invertebrates would soon recolonise the restored stream following any work in the streambed.

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